Wash. to appeal felon vote ruling to Supreme Court - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Wash. to appeal felon vote ruling to Supreme Court

Attorney General Rob McKenna Attorney General Rob McKenna

OLYMPIA, Wash. - Attorney General Rob McKenna and Secretary of State Sam Reed say they will ask the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn an appellate court's decision that would give Washington state felons in prison and on community supervision the right to vote.
     
McKenna and Reed announced their decision Wednesday. The appeal has to be filed with the court by April, and the state will seek a stay on felony inmates' ability to vote until the case is resolved.
     
Tuesday's 2-1 ruling by a three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned the 2000 ruling of a district judge in Spokane. The appeals court says Washington state's felon disenfranchisement law violates the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Previous Coverage
Fed Judges: Wash. felony inmates should get vote

A federal appeals court has ruled that imprisoned felons should be allowed to vote in Washington to ensure that racial minorities are protected under the Voting Rights Act.
     
Tuesday's 2-1 ruling by a three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned the 2000 ruling of a district judge in Spokane. That judge had ruled that state law did not violate the act, and dismissed a lawsuit filed by a former prison inmate from Bellevue.
     
The two appellate judges ruled that disparities in the state's justice system "cannot be explained in race-neutral ways."
     
A spokeswoman says state Attorney General Rob McKenna is weighing the state's next step.

  • Most Popular StoriesMost Popular StoriesMore>>

  • Police impersonator attempts to pull over Spokane woman

    Police impersonator attempts to pull over Spokane woman

    Monday, September 17 2018 8:45 PM EDT2018-09-18 00:45:37 GMT

    SPOKANE, Wash. - "He told me to pull over, and my jaw just dropped," a Spokane woman, who says a fake police officer tried to pull her over, doesn't want to be named. In fear, this could happen again. "It really scared me and kind of threw me off that night. I don't even want to drive by myself anymore," she said. She tells me that she was driving around North Spokane at night on her way home from work. 

    >>

    SPOKANE, Wash. - "He told me to pull over, and my jaw just dropped," a Spokane woman, who says a fake police officer tried to pull her over, doesn't want to be named. In fear, this could happen again. "It really scared me and kind of threw me off that night. I don't even want to drive by myself anymore," she said. She tells me that she was driving around North Spokane at night on her way home from work. 

    >>
  • Report: Olympia woman refuses to pull over for WSP trooper because she drives a Prius

    Report: Olympia woman refuses to pull over for WSP trooper because she drives a Prius

    Monday, September 17 2018 1:45 PM EDT2018-09-17 17:45:44 GMT

    MARYSVILLE, Wash. - An Olympia woman wouldn't pull over for a Washington State Patrol trooper because she drives a Prius, according to an arrest report.

    >>

    MARYSVILLE, Wash. - An Olympia woman wouldn't pull over for a Washington State Patrol trooper because she drives a Prius, according to an arrest report.

    >>
  • Man accused of assault after putting wife with dementia on leash

    Man accused of assault after putting wife with dementia on leash

    Tuesday, September 18 2018 10:40 AM EDT2018-09-18 14:40:20 GMT

    A Maryland man is facing a simple assault charge after using a dog leash to lead his wife around a Pennsylvania fair because she has late-stage dementia.    West Manchester police say Walter Wolford yanked the 8-inch long red nylon leash, causing his wife's head to jerk back and leave red marks around her throat. But the 66-year-old Hagerstown man says he only gently tugged on the leash, which he uses to keep his wife from getting lost.    

    >>

    A Maryland man is facing a simple assault charge after using a dog leash to lead his wife around a Pennsylvania fair because she has late-stage dementia.    West Manchester police say Walter Wolford yanked the 8-inch long red nylon leash, causing his wife's head to jerk back and leave red marks around her throat. But the 66-year-old Hagerstown man says he only gently tugged on the leash, which he uses to keep his wife from getting lost.    

    >>
HD DOPPLER 6i
/