City offering incentives for installing rain or moisture sensor... - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

City offering incentives for installing rain or moisture sensor sprinklers

SPOKANE, Wash. - The City of Spokane is offering its residential water customers up to a $375 water bill credit for upgrading new or existing automatic sprinkler systems with new Smart Controls.

Water consumption during the outdoor watering season jumps dramatically, especially from July through September, and most summer water consumption is associated with watering lawns. By installing "Smart Controls" on automatic sprinkler systems, the system automatically determines the correct amount of water needed for current conditions, preventing over and under watering. 

Protecting and preserving our water resources is a long-term goal of the City and is part of our sustainability efforts. The City's Water Department also must meet water conservation goals as part of its regulatory requirements. 

Smart Controls that qualify for incentives are Evapotranspiration (ET) Controllers with a Rain Sensor or Soil Moisture Sensor on new systems, and a Rain Sensor, Conservation Controller, and ET Controller with Soil Moisture Sensor (with a Conservation Controller) on existing automatic sprinkler systems.

Interested homeowners may pre-qualify for the program by calling the City of Spokane Water Stewardship Coordinator at 625-6279 or Doug Greenlund at 625-6533. For residents without underground sprinklers, the City is giving away hose timers at environmental and gardening events. 

For water saving tips or to download the sprinkler system incentive information and application, go to waterstewardship.org.

 

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