Graphic Cigarette Warning Labels On Packs Unveiled By FDA - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Graphic Cigarette Warning Labels On Packs Unveiled By FDA

RICHMOND, Va. - Corpses, cancer patients and diseased lungs: These are some of the images the federal government plans for larger, graphic warning labels for cigarette packages.

The images are part of a new push announced by the Food and Drug Administration and the Department of Health and Human Services on Wednesday to reduce tobacco use, which is responsible for about 443,000 deaths per year.

The number of Americans who smoke has fallen dramatically over the past 40 years, but those declines have stalled recently. About 46 million adults in the U.S., or 20.6 percent, smoke cigarettes, along with 19.5 percent of high school students.

The new prevention plan is part of the law passed in June 2009 giving the FDA authority to regulate tobacco, including marketing and labeling guidelines, banning certain products and limiting nicotine. The law doesn't let the FDA ban nicotine or tobacco entirely.

"Today, FDA takes a crucial step toward reducing the tremendous toll of illness and death caused by tobacco use by proposing to dramatically change how cigarette packages and advertising look in this country," FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg said in a news release.

"The health consequences of smoking will be obvious every time someone picks up a pack of cigarettes."

The FDA is proposing 36 labels for public comment, which include phrases like "smoking can kill you" and "cigarettes cause cancer," but also feature graphic images to convey the dangers of tobacco use.

The agency will select the final labels in June after reviews of scientific literature, public comments, and results from an 18,000-person study. Cigarette makers will then have 15 months to start using the new labels.

The new warning labels are to take up half of a pack -- both front and back -- of cigarettes and contain "color graphics depicting the negative health consequences." Warning labels also must constitute 20 percent of advertisements.

"It acts as a very public billboard because you all of the sudden are reading something about lung cancer from that pack behind the cash register, whereas before you were just reading Marlboro," said David Hammond, a health behavior researcher at the University of Waterloo in Canada, who is working with the firm designing the labels with for the FDA.

In recent years, several countries have introduced labels similar to those proposed by the FDA.
While it is impossible to say how many people quit because of the labels that have been introduced in several countries, Hammond said every source of evidence suggests that the labels do help people quit.

Given the population in the U.S., the impact of the warning labels could be "significant," Hammond said.

  • Most Popular StoriesMost Popular StoriesMore>>

  • Fire Marshal: Fireplace sparked fatal fire at Idaho cabin

    Fire Marshal: Fireplace sparked fatal fire at Idaho cabin

    Saturday, September 23 2017 2:09 AM EDT2017-09-23 06:09:41 GMT
    Fire Marshal: Fireplace sparked fatal fire at Idaho cabinFire Marshal: Fireplace sparked fatal fire at Idaho cabin

    BOISE, Idaho (AP) - The Idaho state fire marshal says an explosion in a fireplace caused a fire that consumed a house and killed four people. Knute Sandahl said Thursday the explosion, which occurred June 30 at Tamarack Resort, was ruled accidental. Sandahl says the fireplace on the main floor of the home was converted from propane-fueled to wood-burning in 2015. During the conversion to wood, the propane line that fed the fireplace was 

    >>

    BOISE, Idaho (AP) - The Idaho state fire marshal says an explosion in a fireplace caused a fire that consumed a house and killed four people. Knute Sandahl said Thursday the explosion, which occurred June 30 at Tamarack Resort, was ruled accidental. Sandahl says the fireplace on the main floor of the home was converted from propane-fueled to wood-burning in 2015. During the conversion to wood, the propane line that fed the fireplace was 

    >>
  • Ghost tours will continue at closed Colfax hospital

    Ghost tours will continue at closed Colfax hospital

    Friday, September 22 2017 5:19 PM EDT2017-09-22 21:19:47 GMT

    COLFAX, Wash. (AP) - It looks like the tours and ghost hunts will continue at the haunted hospital in the town of Colfax. A structural engineer from Spokane has told the city's Downtown Association that the building is structurally sound, opening the door for one more year of tours at St. Ignatius Hospital. The Lewiston Tribune reports the tours raised more than $30,000 from 2015-16 for the Colfax Chamber of Commerce and Downtown Association. 

    >>

    COLFAX, Wash. (AP) - It looks like the tours and ghost hunts will continue at the haunted hospital in the town of Colfax. A structural engineer from Spokane has told the city's Downtown Association that the building is structurally sound, opening the door for one more year of tours at St. Ignatius Hospital. The Lewiston Tribune reports the tours raised more than $30,000 from 2015-16 for the Colfax Chamber of Commerce and Downtown Association. 

    >>
  • South Hill man gives deputy ride to chase down suspect on the run

    South Hill man gives deputy ride to chase down suspect on the run

    Saturday, September 23 2017 2:10 AM EDT2017-09-23 06:10:59 GMT

    SPOKANE, Wash. - Spokane County Sheriff's Deputies are calling a 79-year-old man a hero for stepping in to help a deputy when he suddenly needed it.   That deputy tried stopping a driver on the South Hill after noticing the car didn't have license plates.     It started a chase that ended with the help from a very unlikely place. For Paul Eminger, it was a case of being in the right place at the right time. Seeing a Sheriff's Deputy running after 

    >>

    SPOKANE, Wash. - Spokane County Sheriff's Deputies are calling a 79-year-old man a hero for stepping in to help a deputy when he suddenly needed it.   That deputy tried stopping a driver on the South Hill after noticing the car didn't have license plates.     It started a chase that ended with the help from a very unlikely place. For Paul Eminger, it was a case of being in the right place at the right time. Seeing a Sheriff's Deputy running after 

    >>
HD DOPPLER 6i
/