Fed-Up With Your boss? You're Not Alone As 28% Quit Their Job Ov - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Fed-Up With Your boss? You're Not Alone As 28% Quit Their Job Over Bad Management

KHQ.COM - Workers are quitting their jobs and even switching chosen careers because they're fed-up with their boss.

A survey found 28% of workers have moved work in an attempt to find someone who can motivate them more.

More than one in ten have taken up a completely new career in their search, while one in 20 has decided to set up their own business to get away from bad management.

Asked what they thought were the qualities of a good manager, the top credentials were: Approachability (83 percent), a good communicator (82 percent), supportive (81 percent), a good leader (80 percent) and someone who respects their staff as individuals (76 percent).

The report, compiled for bank First Direct also showed bad behavior in the workplace is putting a strain on British business.

When working under a bad boss, employees report a loss of motivation (47 percent) and productivity (28 percent), with one in five (18 percent) taking 'sickies' as an avoidance tactic.

Paul Say, First Direct's Head of Marketing, said: 'When it comes to fostering British creativity at work, it seems many managers are holding back the true potential of their staff.

'More than three quarters of workers (77 percent) think their boss does not encourage new ideas or allow self-expression.

'The results make for bleak reading and given the current economic climate, so much untapped potential is a serious issue.

'But valuing workers as individuals and embracing their creativity can make all the difference - which is why we have launched a new search to find and reward the best bosses in Britain.'

The findings are featured in the Colourful Lives Report by the Future Foundation, commissioned by first direct to mark its 21st birthday.

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