Reporter's Strange On-Air Lapse Explained - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Reporter's Strange On-Air Lapse Explained

LOS ANGELES (AP) - A TV reporter who lapsed into gibberish during a live shot outside the Grammys said she was terrified when it happened and knew something was wrong as soon as she opened her mouth.

KCBS-TV reporter Serene Branson's incoherence Sunday fueled Internet speculation that she suffered an on-air stroke. But doctors at the University of California, Los Angeles, where she went to get a brain scan and blood work done, ruled it out. Doctors said she suffered a type of migraine that can mimic symptoms of a stroke.

Branson told CBS' "The Early Show" in an interview Friday that she was terrified, scared and confused, and didn't know what was going on.

"I knew something wasn't right as soon as I opened my mouth," she said. "I hadn't been feeling well a little bit before the live shot. I had a headache, my vision was very blurry. I knew something wasn't right, but I just thought I was tired. So when I opened my mouth, I thought, 'This is more than just being tired. Something is terribly wrong.' I wanted to say, 'Lady Antebellum swept the Grammys.' And I could think of the words, but I could not get them coming out properly."

Branson, who was diagnosed with migraine aura, said watching herself in the clip is "troubling."

Kerry Maller, a KCBS producer, told "The Early Show," "You could see in the tape she's trying to talk."

Maller, who was on-location with the veteran reporter, said, "After the live shot, she dropped the microphone and got very wobbly."

The station quickly cut away and Branson was swarmed by photographers and her field producer. She was examined by paramedics and recovered at home.

Branson recalled, "They sat me down immediately. I dropped the microphone. Right after that, my cheek went numb, my hand went numb, my right hand went numb and I started to cry. I was scared. I didn't know what had gone on and I was embarrassed and fearful.

"I was scared, nervous, confused, exhausted, and in an evening dress in the back of an ambulance."

She returned to the KCBS-TV newsroom on Thursday.

Most people with migraines don't have any warning. But about 20 to 30 percent experience sensations before or during a migraine attack.

"A migraine is not just a headache. It's a complicated brain event," said UCLA neurologist Dr. Andrew Charles, who examined Branson.

The most common sensations include seeing flashes of light or zigzag patterns. In Branson's case, she felt numbness on the right side of her face that affected her speech, Charles said.

"She was actually having the headache while she was having these other symptoms," he said.

Branson told doctors she has had migraines since a child but never suffered an episode like this before, Charles said.

Branson, a Los Angeles native and two-time Emmy nominee, worked at the CBS affiliate in Sacramento before joining KCBS. Prior to that, she was a reporter and anchor at TV stations in Palm Springs and Santa Barbara.

A telephone message left with KCBS was not immediately returned Thursday.

  • Most Popular StoriesMost Popular StoriesMore>>

  • 2 bodies found in pickup truck near Washington highway

    2 bodies found in pickup truck near Washington highway

    Thursday, May 25 2017 8:04 PM EDT2017-05-26 00:04:42 GMT
    2 bodies found in pickup truck near Washington highway2 bodies found in pickup truck near Washington highway

    WENATCHEE, Wash. (AP) - The bodies of a man and woman have been found in a pickup truck near a Washington highway. KCPQ-TV reported Wednesday that the Chelan County Sheriff's Office says it appears someone had been trying to conceal the vehicle. The deputy who went to the call had said someone attempted to conceal the truck with a blanket, duct tape and natural vegetation from the area. The bodies had been in the driver's seat and front passe...

    >>

    WENATCHEE, Wash. (AP) - The bodies of a man and woman have been found in a pickup truck near a Washington highway. KCPQ-TV reported Wednesday that the Chelan County Sheriff's Office says it appears someone had been trying to conceal the vehicle. The deputy who went to the call had said someone attempted to conceal the truck with a blanket, duct tape and natural vegetation from the area. The bodies had been in the driver's seat and front passe...

    >>
  • Woman's warning after she says a stranger followed her home

    Woman's warning after she says a stranger followed her home

    Thursday, May 25 2017 9:04 PM EDT2017-05-26 01:04:30 GMT

    SPOKANE, Wash. - One Spokane woman wants to warn people to be careful when they’re out by themselves after she says she had a run-in with a strange man. “He made the hairs on my neck stand up. He gave me a weird feeling,” she says. She didn’t want to be identified because she’s still afraid. She was out walking her dog near 55th and Freya when a man suddenly appeared very close to her “I looked up and he was right there,” she 

    >>

    SPOKANE, Wash. - One Spokane woman wants to warn people to be careful when they’re out by themselves after she says she had a run-in with a strange man. “He made the hairs on my neck stand up. He gave me a weird feeling,” she says. She didn’t want to be identified because she’s still afraid. She was out walking her dog near 55th and Freya when a man suddenly appeared very close to her “I looked up and he was right there,” she 

    >>
  • Young inventor from Post Falls appears on 'The Ellen DeGeneres Show'

    Young inventor from Post Falls appears on 'The Ellen DeGeneres Show'

    Thursday, May 25 2017 9:16 PM EDT2017-05-26 01:16:56 GMT
    Courtesy Ellen TVCourtesy Ellen TV

    POST FALLS, Idaho - A young inventor by the name of Alex Knoll made his big debut on 'The Ellen DeGeneres Show" Thursday. 12-year-old Alex is from Post Falls, Idaho and is the creator of an award-winning app. He developed Ability App to help improve the lives of those with disabilities by giving them resources to make informed decisions. On the talk show, Alex shared with Ellen stories of his hero and background on the app. Alex is 

    >>

    POST FALLS, Idaho - A young inventor by the name of Alex Knoll made his big debut on 'The Ellen DeGeneres Show" Thursday. 12-year-old Alex is from Post Falls, Idaho and is the creator of an award-winning app. He developed Ability App to help improve the lives of those with disabilities by giving them resources to make informed decisions. On the talk show, Alex shared with Ellen stories of his hero and background on the app. Alex is 

    >>
HD DOPPLER 6i
/