Inside The Raid That KILLED Osama - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

NEW DETAILS ON HOW BIN LADEN WAS HUNTED DOWN AND KILLED BY US FORCES

UPDATE: The FBI and Department of Homeland Security are warning law enforcement across the country that Osama bin Laden's death will likely inspire homegrown extremists in the U.S.
to try to carry out attacks in the near-term.

>>>CLICK HERE FOR LIVE VIDEO

The agencies issued a joint intelligence bulletin Monday that said the core al-Qaida group is less likely to carry out attacks against the U.S. in the immediate future, but its spinoff groups
around the world could use bin Laden's death as an excuse to speed up plans for attacks. The bulletin was obtained by The Associated Press.

The intelligence community has no information of advanced terror plots in the U.S., but believes U.S. cities, aviation, mass transit and U.S. government facilities will continue to be attractive targets for terrorists, according to the joint bulletin.
     

UPDATE: The White House says it has made no decision on whether to release photographic proof that Osama bin Laden is dead.

John Brennan, President Barack Obama's counterterrorism adviser, says the administration will do everything it can to make sure no one can deny U.S. claims that the al-Qaida leader was killed during a firefight with U.S. forces in Pakistan.

>>>CLICK HERE TO LOOK AT THE COMPOUND WHERE OBAMA WAS FOUND AND KILLED

But Brennan says still to be determined is whether to release a photo of bin Laden's dead body. Brennan says one concern is whether doing so could potentially jeopardize similar operations and intelligence sources in the future.

UPDATE: The White House counterterrorism adviser says that the U.S. forces who killed Osama bin Laden would have taken him alive if they had the opportunity.

Adviser John Brennan said that the White House thought bin Laden would resist but that there was a "remote" possibility he could be captured alive. Brennan told reporters at the White House Monday that the contingency was prepared for.

Brennan said that it only would have happened if bin Laden didn't pose any threat to the Americans sent to take him out. Since he fought back, he was killed.   

UPDATE: President Barack Obama's top counterterrorism adviser says it's inconceivable that Osama bin Laden didn't have some support in Pakistan, the country where he was hiding when he was killed in a firefight with U.S. forces.

John Brennan says the White House is talking with the Pakistani government and pledged to pursue all leads to find out what type of support system or benefactors bin Laden might have had.

Bin Laden was killed during a raid on a fortified compound in a Pakistani town two hours outside the capital of Islamabad.

UPDATE: A U.S. official says Osama bin Laden went down firing at the Navy SEALS who stormed his compound. An official familiar with the operation says bin Laden was hit
by a barrage of carefully aimed return fire.

The official spoke on condition of anonymity because aspects of the operation remain classified.

The official says two dozen SEALS in night-vision goggles dropped into the high-walled compound in Pakistan by sliding down ropes from Chinook helicopters in the overnight raid.

U.S. officials say bin Laden was killed near the end of the 40-minute raid.

The SEALs retrieved bin Laden's body and turned the remaining detainees over to Pakistani authorities.

UPDATE: Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton says counterterrorism cooperation with Pakistan helped lead the U.S. to al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden and the compound outside the Pakistani capital where he was killed by American special forces.

Speaking to reporters at the State Department on Monday, Clinton thanked Pakistan for its cooperation and said the country "has contributed greatly to our efforts to dismantle al-Qaida." She said that "in fact, cooperation with Pakistan helped lead us to bin Laden and the compound in which he was hiding."

Clinton's comments came amid questions over whether Pakistani intelligence and military officials knew of bin Laden's whereabouts so close to Islamabad and whether they had shared the information with the U.S.  

UPDATE: Navy SEALs are being told to keep the details to themselves after the famous military special operations group killed Osama bin Laden in an overnight raid in Pakistan early Monday.

The Navy officer in charge of the elite unit told his troops Monday that they should be proud but keep quiet about it. In an email message obtained by The Associated Press, Rear Adm. Ed
Winters also says the fight is not over, and sharing too many details can endanger the next operation.

A unit of specially trained SEALS known as SEAL Team 6 stormed a secret compound in Pakistan overnight. The operation involved a small number of U.S. forces and lasted about 40 minutes.

U.S. officials say the SEALs left with bin Laden's body and unspecified evidence gathered at the scene.

UPDATE: Officials say CIA interrogators in secret overseas prisons developed the first strands of information that ultimately led to the killing of Osama bin Laden.

Current and former U.S. officials say that Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the mastermind of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, provided the nom de guerre of one of bin Laden's most trusted
aides. The CIA got similar information Mohammed's successor, Abu Faraj al-Libi. Both were subjected to harsh interrogation tactics inside CIA prisons in Poland and Romania.

The news is sure to reignite debate over whether the now-closed interrogation and detention program was successful. Former president George W. Bush authorized the CIA to use the harshest interrogation tactics in U.S. history. President Barack Obama closed the prison system.

UPDATE: WASHINGTON (AP) - The FBI has updated its list of Most Wanted terrorists to note that Osama bin Laden is dead. Its website, with details about bin Laden and the $27 million being offered in rewards, now includes a large red-and-white "deceased" label atop bin Laden's photograph.

Nine other highly sought after terrorists are still included on the FBI's list, including bin Laden's deputy, Ayman Al-Zawahiri. The U.S. government also is offering a $25 million reward for
information leading to his capture or conviction. Private groups had added $2 million in rewards on top of the $25 million bounty placed on bin Laden.

Bin Laden was killed in a gun battle with U.S. forces early Monday in Pakistan.
 
PREVIOUS COVERAGE:

WASHINGTON -- Helicopters descended out of darkness on the most important counterterrorism mission in U.S. history. It was an operation so secret, only a select few U.S. officials knew what was about to happen.

The location was a fortified compound in the affluent Pakistani suburbs of Islamabad. The target was Osama bin Laden.

Intelligence officials discovered the compound in August while monitoring an al-Qaida courier. The CIA had been hunting that courier for years, ever since detainees told interrogators that the courier was so trusted by bin Laden that he might very well be living with the al-Qaida leader.

Nestled in an affluent neighborhood, the compound was surrounded by walls as high as 18 feet, topped with barbed wire. Two security gates guarded the only way in. A third-floor terrace was shielded by a seven-foot privacy wall. No phone lines or Internet cables ran to the property. The residents burned their garbage rather than put it out for collection. Intelligence officials believed the million-dollar compound was built five years ago to protect a major terrorist figure. The question was, who?

The CIA asked itself again and again who might be living behind those walls. Each time, they concluded it was almost certainly bin Laden.

President Barack Obama described the operation in broad strokes Sunday night. Details were provided in interviews with counterterrorism and intelligence authorities, senior administration officials and other U.S. officials. All spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss the sensitive operation.

By mid-February, intelligence from multiple sources was clear enough that Obama wanted to "pursue an aggressive course of action," a senior administration official said. Over the next two and a half months, Obama led five meetings of the National Security Council focused solely on whether bin Laden was in that compound and, if so, how to get him, the official said.

Normally, the U.S. shares its counterterrorism intelligence widely with trusted allies in Britain, Canada, Australia and elsewhere. And the U.S. normally does not carry out ground operations inside Pakistan without collaboration with Pakistani intelligence. But this mission was too important and too secretive.

On April 29, Obama approved an operation to kill bin Laden. It was a mission that required surgical accuracy, even more precision than could be delivered by the government's sophisticated Predator drones. To execute it, Obama tapped a small contingent of the Navy's elite SEAL Team Six and put them under the command of CIA Director Leon Panetta, whose analysts monitored the compound from afar. Click here to read more from Huffingtonpost.com

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