Additional Reports Of 'Q' Fever Reported In Grant County - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Additional Reports Of 'Q' Fever Reported In Grant County

GRANT COUNTY, WA – Grant County Health District (GCHD) is investigating additional reports of human cases of Q fever, a bacterial disease primarily caused from contact with goats, sheep and cattle.
On Monday, June 13, 2011, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) sent a Q fever team to Grant County. GCHD and the Washington State Department of Health are cooperating with the CDC on the investigation. Questions about the CDC's investigation should be sent to Emily Zielinski-Gutierrez at Ebz0@cdc.gov.

GCHD is communicating with the medical community with updates and Q fever testing recommendations. Concerns regarding family members health should be directed the family doctor. Animal health questions should be directed to a veterinarian or the WA State Dept of Agriculture: (360) 902-1878. Media questions for WSDA can be directed to Jason Kelly at (360) 902-1815.


Q fever does not spread from person to person. The bacteria that causes Q fever is most often found in the urine, feces, and milk of infected farm animals such as cattle, goats, and sheep. However, the number of bacteria is highest in birthing fluids and after-birth, putting people at greatest risk for getting the disease when around infected animals that are giving birth. There are no milk products known to have circulated from the herds being investigated in Grant County. Eating meat does not cause Q fever.

Q fever Symptoms:

Only about one-half of all people infected with Q fever show immediate signs of illness. Most cases begin with one or more of the following symptoms:

• high fevers (up to 104-105°F)
• severe headache
• general malaise (You don't feel like you usually feel)
• muscle aches
• chills and/or sweats
• non-productive cough
• nausea
• vomiting
• diarrhea
• stomach pain
• chest pain

Although most persons with Q fever recover, others can have serious illness that can include pneumonia, inflammation of the liver and heart, and central nervous system complications. Treatment with antibiotics may shorten the illness. In rare cases, the illness can carry on for long periods of time.
Who's at greatest risk for complications from Q fever?


The people at highest risk for Q fever complications are pregnant women, people with weak immune systems and patients with heart valve defects. People in these groups should be cautious when in contact with goats, sheep or cattle, and should not participate in birthing processes.
For more information on Q fever visit www.cdc.gov/qfever/index.html.

  • Most Popular StoriesMost Popular StoriesMore>>

  • Washington State University mourns loss of strength and conditioning coach

    Washington State University mourns loss of strength and conditioning coach

    Sunday, February 25 2018 2:28 PM EST2018-02-25 19:28:52 GMT

    PULLMAN, Wash. - Washington State University's Athletic Department reported Sunday that longtime strength and conditioning coach David Lang suddenly passed away Saturday. Lang was a member of the department for 20 years.

    >>

    PULLMAN, Wash. - Washington State University's Athletic Department reported Sunday that longtime strength and conditioning coach David Lang suddenly passed away Saturday. Lang was a member of the department for 20 years.

    >>
  • Woman prevents girl's kidnapping by pretending to be her mother

    Woman prevents girl's kidnapping by pretending to be her mother

    Saturday, February 24 2018 5:24 PM EST2018-02-24 22:24:02 GMT
    Santa Ana Police DepartmentSanta Ana Police Department
    Santa Ana Police DepartmentSanta Ana Police Department

    SANTA ANA, Calif. - A woman was arrested Wednesday after she allegedly tried to kidnap a 12-year-old girl who was on her way to school in Santa Ana, California. Police are crediting another woman with preventing it from happening.  KTLA reports that Amy Martinez was on her way to Lathrop Intermediate School when she was confronted by a woman who was described as homeless. "She just came up to me and went like this," Amy said, simulating a bear-hug.

    >>

    SANTA ANA, Calif. - A woman was arrested Wednesday after she allegedly tried to kidnap a 12-year-old girl who was on her way to school in Santa Ana, California. Police are crediting another woman with preventing it from happening.  KTLA reports that Amy Martinez was on her way to Lathrop Intermediate School when she was confronted by a woman who was described as homeless. "She just came up to me and went like this," Amy said, simulating a bear-hug.

    >>
  • Make-A-Wish grants local boy's wish

    Make-A-Wish grants local boy's wish

    Saturday, February 24 2018 8:27 PM EST2018-02-25 01:27:24 GMT

    Spokane, Wash. 14-year-old Jack Sleeth of Spokane has always had a passion for cars and trucks. He was only 4-years-old when he inherited his grandfather's 1968 Ford F-Series pick-up truck. Growing up Jack used the truck as a playhouse to feel closer to his grandfather when he passed, "this is my first one and I just always sit in it, I learned how to drive stick in it," said Jack telling us the history he has with the truck. Just over a year and a half ago, Jack suddenl

    >>

    Spokane, Wash. 14-year-old Jack Sleeth of Spokane has always had a passion for cars and trucks. He was only 4-years-old when he inherited his grandfather's 1968 Ford F-Series pick-up truck. Growing up Jack used the truck as a playhouse to feel closer to his grandfather when he passed, "this is my first one and I just always sit in it, I learned how to drive stick in it," said Jack telling us the history he has with the truck. Just over a year and a half ago, Jack suddenl

    >>
HD DOPPLER 6i
/