Budget Problems Could Cause Changes At Post Offices - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Budget Problems Could Cause Changes At Post Offices

SPOKANE, Wash. - Thursday the United States Postal Service outlined a new survival plan which will slash billions of dollars from its bottom line. The new plan may mean the end, once and for all, for weekend deliveries. In a press conference USPS officials explained that USPS needs to cut 35,000 jobs and consolidate nearly 250 processing facilities to save an estimated $3 billion dollars annually.

United States Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe said, "Our immediate goal is to reduce total cost by 20 billion dollars by 2015."

The USPS service has roots older than our nation but to survive in this age of email and overnight deliveries, it's being forced to change.

Some proposed changes? Saturday delivery may become a thing of the past and First-Class mail may not show up in your mailbox quite so fast. By delivering regional mail in two days instead of one, The Postal Service can reduce wages and overtime, transportation and fuel, facility and networking costs across the board."

At this point, 3,700 retail offices are under review. Some will be downsized to so-called village post offices inside grocery stores, pharmacies or other retailers.

A USPS spokesman said the agency plans to study moving mail processing done in Missoula and Kalispell to Spokane. In the meantime, Spokane's postmaster said it doesn't appear that any processing facilities will close in Spokane. If there are regional changes, they will most likely be at smaller locations like Pasco and Yakima.

None of the proposals are set in stone. Changes need to be approved by Congress first.

This story was filed by KHQ Local News Reporter and Anchor Chelsea Kopta

  • Most Popular StoriesMost Popular StoriesMore>>

  • New York State illegally moving convicted sex offenders from prisons into group homes with the developmentally disabled

    New York State illegally moving convicted sex offenders from prisons into group homes with the developmentally disabled

    Thursday, September 20 2018 9:14 AM EDT2018-09-20 13:14:31 GMT
    Three State agencies are involved in placing convicted sex offenders in group homes or hiding this information from the families and the general public>>
    Three State agencies are involved in placing convicted sex offenders in group homes or hiding this information from the families and the general public>>
  • Opponents and activists for I-1639 sound off

    Opponents and activists for I-1639 sound off

    Saturday, September 22 2018 9:16 PM EDT2018-09-23 01:16:50 GMT

    SPOKANE, Wash. - Initiative-1639 has been the root of controversy ever since supporters began asking for signatures. It became even more complicated when the Washington Supreme Court overturned a Thurston County judges decision after the judge initially threw out over 300,000 signatures saying the petition didn't follow election law claiming it was unreadable. 

    >>

    SPOKANE, Wash. - Initiative-1639 has been the root of controversy ever since supporters began asking for signatures. It became even more complicated when the Washington Supreme Court overturned a Thurston County judges decision after the judge initially threw out over 300,000 signatures saying the petition didn't follow election law claiming it was unreadable. 

    >>
  • Hayden students go viral for patriotic flag photo

    Hayden students go viral for patriotic flag photo

    Thursday, September 20 2018 8:04 PM EDT2018-09-21 00:04:30 GMT

    HAYDEN, Idaho - Old Glory flies triumphantly above Hayden Meadows Elementary. But, every day at the end of school, three keepers of the flag make sure she’s in safe hands. Fifth graders Naylan Tuttle, Jack LeBreck, and Casey Dolan go through the steps necessary to make sure the U.S. flag is properly folded and stored without it ever touching the ground.

    >>

    HAYDEN, Idaho - Old Glory flies triumphantly above Hayden Meadows Elementary. But, every day at the end of school, three keepers of the flag make sure she’s in safe hands. Fifth graders Naylan Tuttle, Jack LeBreck, and Casey Dolan go through the steps necessary to make sure the U.S. flag is properly folded and stored without it ever touching the ground.

    >>
HD DOPPLER 6i
/