Local Pig Farmer Gets Rich on Fantasy Baseball - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Local Pig Farmer Gets Rich On Fantasy Baseball

GREENCREEK, ID - A pig farmer from a small North Central Idaho town isn't worrying about the success of his business thanks to the financial success of his hobby.

Lindy Hinkelman has passionately raised pigs on his small farm in Greencreek, Idaho for almost 40 years.

"Just a way of life that I really enjoy," said Lindy Hinkelman, pig farmer. "They're actually really easy animals to take care of."

He cares for an average of 400-500 pigs at a time. He feeds them and breeds them, making sure they're properly cared for before being sold on the market.

But for the past three years, he hasn't had to worry about his business being successful because of a more unique way to bring home the bacon. Thanks to his other passion in life of baseball.

Lindy spends close to six hours a day during the season in his small office in his basement tinkering with his fantasy baseball team, and a successful one at that.

"The last three years, I've won over $360,000," said Hinkelman.

Since 2004, Lindy has played in a high-stakes, high payout national fantasy baseball league, and in the past three years he has won the main event title prize twice.

"It's an unbelievable feeling to win something like that, it's a big high," said Hinkelman.

His success is based on both hard work and a lot of luck.

"I've had good fortune, but I have the skill set to take advantage," said Hinkelman.

He's come up with a system that works. Lots of online studying and picking players he likes. Trying to stay away from the big name guys. He spends so many hours working on his teams, it might look like a full-time job, but Lindy doesn't consider it as one.

"It's not work at all, it's something I enjoy, it's a hobby," said Hinkelman.

"it's pretty cool how he can do that and be successful at it," said Aaron Hinkelman, brother.

Lindy's family says his recent success and fame is deserved, but starting to get to his head.

"I tease him that he's going to have to get something to hold his head up, and I think it should go, I think it's great," said Janis Forsmann, sister.

And even though the big money is coming in now, Lindy isn't about to sell the farm.

"It'll take a little bit more than that to give up my day job," said Hinkelman.

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