Why PETA Is Offering To Clear Spokane City Hall Sidewalks - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Why PETA Is Offering To Clear Spokane City Hall Sidewalks

SPOKANE, Wash. - PETA has sent a letter to Spokane Mayor David Condon with an offer that the group hopes he won't refuse: PETA will help the city save money by clearing all the sidewalks around City Hall after the city's next snowstorm if the mayor grants the group permission to stencil its anti-chaining ad on the sidewalk.

The ad shows a sad, chained dog and reads, "Chained Dog? A Chilling Tail." PETA picked Spokane because despite the city's cold winters and abundant snowfall (at least most winters), it has no anti-chaining law. PETA hopes that the stencil inspires councilmembers to ban the chaining of dogs, as legislators in many forward-thinking towns and cities across the U.S. have already done.

Weigh in on whether you think Spokane should have an anti-dog chaining law on Dave Cotton's KHQ Facebook page. 

"'Backyard dogs' are subjected to everything from temperature extremes to attacks by abusers to mind-wasting loneliness," says PETA Vice President Daphna Nachminovitch. "We urge the mayor to accept our offer, and we implore residents to allow dogs indoors—not just when it snows but year-round."

For these highly social pack animals, PETA says, life at the end of a chain is no life at all. Deprived of everything that is natural and important to them, chained dogs often go insane from frustration and lack of exercise. Often, all they have to live on is a tiny patch of land, and they must defecate in the same area in which they eat and sleep.

PETA also says chaining dogs can also be deadly for humans. A study authored in part by two Centers for Disease Control and Prevention physicians found that "[b]iting dogs were significantly more likely … to be chained …." According to the study, chained dogs are 2.8 times more likely to attack than dogs who are not tethered.

According to PETA, it receives thousands of complaints about people who leave dogs outdoors in the cold. Although they are equipped with fur coats, dogs can still suffer from frostbite and exposure, and they can become dehydrated when water sources freeze. Cold weather spells extra hardship for "backyard dogs," who often go without adequate food, water, shelter, or veterinary care.

(From PETA.org)

  • Most Popular StoriesMost Popular StoriesMore>>

  • New York State illegally moving convicted sex offenders from prisons into group homes with the developmentally disabled

    New York State illegally moving convicted sex offenders from prisons into group homes with the developmentally disabled

    Thursday, September 20 2018 9:14 AM EDT2018-09-20 13:14:31 GMT
    Three State agencies are involved in placing convicted sex offenders in group homes or hiding this information from the families and the general public>>
    Three State agencies are involved in placing convicted sex offenders in group homes or hiding this information from the families and the general public>>
  • Opponents and activists for I-1639 sound off

    Opponents and activists for I-1639 sound off

    Saturday, September 22 2018 9:16 PM EDT2018-09-23 01:16:50 GMT

    SPOKANE, Wash. - Initiative-1639 has been the root of controversy ever since supporters began asking for signatures. It became even more complicated when the Washington Supreme Court overturned a Thurston County judges decision after the judge initially threw out over 300,000 signatures saying the petition didn't follow election law claiming it was unreadable. 

    >>

    SPOKANE, Wash. - Initiative-1639 has been the root of controversy ever since supporters began asking for signatures. It became even more complicated when the Washington Supreme Court overturned a Thurston County judges decision after the judge initially threw out over 300,000 signatures saying the petition didn't follow election law claiming it was unreadable. 

    >>
  • Hayden students go viral for patriotic flag photo

    Hayden students go viral for patriotic flag photo

    Thursday, September 20 2018 8:04 PM EDT2018-09-21 00:04:30 GMT

    HAYDEN, Idaho - Old Glory flies triumphantly above Hayden Meadows Elementary. But, every day at the end of school, three keepers of the flag make sure she’s in safe hands. Fifth graders Naylan Tuttle, Jack LeBreck, and Casey Dolan go through the steps necessary to make sure the U.S. flag is properly folded and stored without it ever touching the ground.

    >>

    HAYDEN, Idaho - Old Glory flies triumphantly above Hayden Meadows Elementary. But, every day at the end of school, three keepers of the flag make sure she’s in safe hands. Fifth graders Naylan Tuttle, Jack LeBreck, and Casey Dolan go through the steps necessary to make sure the U.S. flag is properly folded and stored without it ever touching the ground.

    >>
HD DOPPLER 6i
/