Gingrich, Romney Spar Ahead Of Florida Debate - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Gingrich, Romney Spar Ahead Of Florida Debate

TAMPA, Fla. (AP) - Just hours before their first Florida debate, Republican presidential candidates Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich are sniping at each other.

Romney is calling Gingrich "erratic" and Gingrich is accusing Romney of lying. Romney also says Gingrich engaged in "potentially wrongful activity" when he worked with former congressional colleagues to push for a prescription drug benefit for Medicare. He's calling on
Gingrich to release his client list for that period.

Gingrich this morning mocked Romney, telling ABC that the former Massachusetts governor is someone "who has decided to make a stand on transparency without being transparent."

Gingrich is also hearing from Rick Santorum, who says the former House speaker is too "high risk" to be the nominee.

The sniping between Gingrich and Romney opened a Florida fight that is shaping up as a pivotal one in determining which of them will be the GOP's presidential nominee.

In the aftermath of Gingrich's South Carolina primary win, his campaign says it took in $1 million in the first 24 hours after the primary.
      
 

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