Idaho Lawmakers Tussle Over State Worker Raises - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Idaho Lawmakers Tussle Over State Worker Raises

BOISE, Idaho (AP) - Lawmakers in the Idaho House have set the stage for more debate on state worker pay raises days after legislative budget writers set the increases at 2 percent.

Republican Rep. Stephen Hartgen of Twin Falls introduced two pieces of legislation Tuesday. One measure supports a 2 percent pay raise for state workers but gives agency directors discretion to
award the increases how they see fit, while the other resolution would ditch the pay increase altogether.

Hartgen expressed frustration with the Joint Finance-Appropriations Committee, which approved a 2 percent, across-the-board raise for state workers meeting performance standards. Hartgen says that power should be reserved for the House Commerce and Human Resources Committee, which he vice chairs.

Hartgen says his intent is to get "the horse back in front of the cart."

      
      (Copyright 2012 by The Associated Press.  All Rights Reserved.)
   

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