Haunted Houses: Putting Safety First For Your Little Ghoul - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Haunted Houses: Putting Safety First For Your Little Ghoul

POST FALLS, Idaho – Halloween is quickly approaching, and local haunted houses will be packed in the coming days.   But with terror around every turn, how safe are they?

Haunted houses are usually regulated by local fire departments based on the international fire code, and fire inspectors will do in-person safety checks before the doors can even open, all to make sure you're scared for the right reason.

KHQ visited the Post Falls Lions Haunted House at 4th & Post in Post Falls for a tour.  Among the cobwebs and coffins inside, are several fire extinguishers, upgraded fire alarms, sprinklers, and emergency exit doors.

"So if there's a problem we just go right straight out," said Ken Cook, the treasurer of the Post Falls Lions Club.

If fire inspectors do find a gross safety hazard that's a threat to life, they can shut down a haunted house on the spot.  If it's a lesser problem, 30 days are usually given to remedy the problem, before fines or other fees may be given.

A Kootenai County Fire & Rescue spokesperson told KHQ the Post Falls Lions Haunted House has a great record of meeting safety regulations. 

Groups of guests go through the house with a monitor, who can help in case of an emergency, and the location of each group is charted throughout the house.

So all you mummy's can rest in peace, knowing that when the witching hour comes, there are no safety skeletons in the closet.

"This is our operating room, we've done a couple surgeries here," Cook said, showing off one room in the haunted house.  "And some of them weren't too successful."

So, as long as you can stand the witches and goblins inside, we say ‘Happy Haunting.'

If you'd like to visit the Post Falls Lions Haunted House, call (208) 618-9755 or visit https://www.facebook.com/pages/Post-Falls-Lions-Haunted-House/102090869856657

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