HIV Comes Back For Two Men Who Hoped For Cure - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

HIV Comes Back For Two Men Who Hoped For Cure

NBCNEWS.COM - Two men who had hoped they might be cured of an HIV infection after getting bone marrow transplants for cancer got some bad news, doctors said Monday. The virus has come back.

The intense and life-threatening treatments for cancer appeared to have wiped the virus out, and the two men took a chance and, earlier this year, stopped taking the HIV drugs that were keeping the virus under control.

At first, no signs of the virus could be found. But their doctors, cautious after decades of fighting a tricky virus, didn't declare a cure. "It's disappointing,' said Dr. Daniel Kuritzkes of Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, who worked with Dr. Timothy Henrich to treat and study the two men. "But it's still taught us a great deal." The case of the two men shows that even if you make HIV seemingly disappear, it can be hiding out in the body and can re-activate. It might be somewhere other than in blood cells, Henrich said.

Other scientists suspect HIV might be able to hole up in organs or inside the intestines. "Through this research we have discovered the HIV reservoir is deeper and more persistent than previously known and that our current standards of probing for HIV may not be sufficient to inform us if long-term HIV remission is possible if antiretroviral therapy is stopped," Henrich said.

"Both patients have resumed therapy and are currently doing well." Neither man wants to be named. Henrich, Kuritzkes and colleagues had actively looked for HIV patients with leukemia or lymphoma who had received bone marrow stem cell transplants. In a bone marrow transplant, the patients' own bone marrow is destroyed, usually with chemotherapy or radiation, and replaced with a tissue-matched transplant from a donor.

Kuritzkes, Henrich and colleagues wanted to replicate the case of Timothy Brown, also known as the "Berlin patient," who was treated for leukemia with a bone marrow transplant that happened to come from a donor with a genetic mutation that makes immune cells resist HIV infection. The transplant replaced his own infected cells with healthy, AIDS-resistant cells, and he remains free of the virus more than five years later.

Then there is the widely reported case of a baby in Mississippi whose HIV infection disappeared after unusually early and aggressive drug treatment.The human immunodeficiency virus that causes AIDS is transmitted sexually, in blood, on infected needles, at birth and in breast milk.

HIV drugs called antiretroviral therapy can keep the virus suppressed to such low levels that patients are healthy and their immune systems are not damaged. People taking the drugs are also less likely to infect someone else, and studies show that uninfected people who take them are much less likely to become infected.

Doctors had hoped that if patients got bone marrow transplants while taking HIV drugs, the virus would not be able to take hold in the freshly transplanted bone marrow cells - which are the source of new blood cells. It's not a lost cause, Kuritzkes said.

"We are continuing to recruit patients into the study," Kuritzkes said. He said several patients who have been treated for cancer are being studied. It might be that people who weren't infected with HIV as long before they got treated might be easier to "cure." "It's not a reason to give up research on a cure," he said.

  • Most Popular StoriesMost Popular StoriesMore>>

  • CdA parents concerned over Zipfizz sale; school district responds

    CdA parents concerned over Zipfizz sale; school district responds

    Monday, October 22 2018 10:46 PM EDT2018-10-23 02:46:38 GMT

    COEUR D'ALENE, Idaho - Ashley Bales says her daughter came home from school one day and told her about classmates at Woodland Middle School selling something she was concerned with, Zipfizz. "With my daughter having a preexisting health conditions it got me concerned for other kids in the same position to be being sold that without their parents having knowledge of it," Bales said.

    >>

    COEUR D'ALENE, Idaho - Ashley Bales says her daughter came home from school one day and told her about classmates at Woodland Middle School selling something she was concerned with, Zipfizz. "With my daughter having a preexisting health conditions it got me concerned for other kids in the same position to be being sold that without their parents having knowledge of it," Bales said.

    >>
  • Suspect from fatal hit-and-run crash in Liberty Lake arrested

    Suspect from fatal hit-and-run crash in Liberty Lake arrested

    Monday, October 22 2018 10:05 PM EDT2018-10-23 02:05:30 GMT

    LIBERTY LAKE, Wash. - A suspect from a fatal hit-and-run crash in Liberty Lake last Thursday has been arrested. After the suspect vehicle was towed to the Liberty Lake Police Department, a search warrant was executed with the assistance of Washington State Patrol. Based on evidence collected, police developed probable cause to arrest 21-year-old Pavel Kanyushkin.

    >>

    LIBERTY LAKE, Wash. - A suspect from a fatal hit-and-run crash in Liberty Lake last Thursday has been arrested. After the suspect vehicle was towed to the Liberty Lake Police Department, a search warrant was executed with the assistance of Washington State Patrol. Based on evidence collected, police developed probable cause to arrest 21-year-old Pavel Kanyushkin.

    >>
  • Changes to Washington overtime rules could increase worker eligibility

    Changes to Washington overtime rules could increase worker eligibility

    Tuesday, October 23 2018 1:24 AM EDT2018-10-23 05:24:23 GMT

    SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) - Proposed changes to Washington state's overtime rules could make more professional workers eligible for time-and-a-half pay. The Spokesman-Review reports a draft concept by the state Department of Labor and Industries proposes overtime eligibility for workers earning up to $74,800 in 2019. The proposals are linked to a multiplier of the state's minimum wage, which will increase to $12 per hour next year and $13.50 per hour in 2020.   

    >>

    SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) - Proposed changes to Washington state's overtime rules could make more professional workers eligible for time-and-a-half pay. The Spokesman-Review reports a draft concept by the state Department of Labor and Industries proposes overtime eligibility for workers earning up to $74,800 in 2019. The proposals are linked to a multiplier of the state's minimum wage, which will increase to $12 per hour next year and $13.50 per hour in 2020.   

    >>
HD DOPPLER 6i
/
  • National NewsMore>>

  • Twitter removes accounts linked to Alex Jones, Infowars

    Twitter removes accounts linked to Alex Jones, Infowars

    Tuesday, October 23 2018 12:56 AM EDT2018-10-23 04:56:07 GMT

    (AP) - Twitter says it has removed accounts linked to conspiracy-monger Alex Jones and Infowars. A Twitter spokesman confirmed Tuesday that the accounts had been removed. There was no additional comment from the company. Twitter permanently suspended realalexjones and infowars from Twitter and Periscope in early September. 

    >>

    (AP) - Twitter says it has removed accounts linked to conspiracy-monger Alex Jones and Infowars. A Twitter spokesman confirmed Tuesday that the accounts had been removed. There was no additional comment from the company. Twitter permanently suspended realalexjones and infowars from Twitter and Periscope in early September. 

    >>
  • Supreme Court: Ross can't be questioned in census suit

    Supreme Court: Ross can't be questioned in census suit

    Monday, October 22 2018 8:43 PM EDT2018-10-23 00:43:44 GMT

    WASHINGTON (AP) - The Supreme Court says Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross does not have to give out-of-court testimony about his decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census. The order Monday comes in response to lawsuits filed by more than a dozen states and big cities, among others, that challenge whether the citizenship question can be legally included.  

    >>

    WASHINGTON (AP) - The Supreme Court says Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross does not have to give out-of-court testimony about his decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census. The order Monday comes in response to lawsuits filed by more than a dozen states and big cities, among others, that challenge whether the citizenship question can be legally included.  

    >>
  • Judge upholds Monsanto verdict, cuts award to $78 million

    Judge upholds Monsanto verdict, cuts award to $78 million

    Monday, October 22 2018 8:41 PM EDT2018-10-23 00:41:30 GMT
    Cropped Photo: Mike Mozart / CC BY 2.0Cropped Photo: Mike Mozart / CC BY 2.0

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - A Northern California judge has upheld a jury's verdict finding Monsanto's weed killer caused a groundskeeper's cancer, but she slashed his $289 million award to $78 million. San Francisco Superior Court Judge Suzanne Bolanos ruled Monday A San Francisco jury's August verdict included $250 million in punitive damages, which the judge said was too high.

    >>

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - A Northern California judge has upheld a jury's verdict finding Monsanto's weed killer caused a groundskeeper's cancer, but she slashed his $289 million award to $78 million. San Francisco Superior Court Judge Suzanne Bolanos ruled Monday A San Francisco jury's August verdict included $250 million in punitive damages, which the judge said was too high.

    >>