UPDATE: Hospital Agrees To Transfer Brain-Dead Teen - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

UPDATE: Hospital Agrees To Transfer Brain-Dead Teen

NBCNEWS.COM - In a reversal, a California hospital agreed Friday to release a brain-dead 13-year-old girl to another facility if her family meets conditions before a Monday deadline for disconnecting her from life support.

Oakland Children's Hospital on Thursday blocked the transfer of Jahi McMath to a San Francisco Bay Area nursing home, telling her family doctors would not perform the necessary tracheotomy or surgery to implant a feeding tube. The unidentified long-term-care facility then backed out.

In a letter Friday to the family's attorney, however, hospital officials wrote they would "allow a lawful transfer of Jahi's body in its current state ... if the family can arrange such a transfer and Children's can legally do so." The hospital said it "will of course continue to do everything legally and ethically permissible" to support the McMaths.

Jahi's family said Friday that a Los Angeles-area facility in North Hollywood had agreed to accept Jahi if the required surgical preparations were made.

The letter, to attorney Christopher Dolan, set forth three conditions for the hospital's cooperation in the transfer, including transportation and "legal approvals."

"At a minimum, the Alameda County Coroner needs to consent to any proposed transfer since we are dealing with the body of a person who has been declared legally dead," said the letter, from the hospital's attorney.

If all of its condition are met, the hospital "looks forward to immediately cooperating in further discussion of the transfer process for Jahi's body."

Jahi was left brain-dead from complications of Dec. 9 surgery to remove her tonsils and clear tissue from her nose and throat to improve her breathing. Tuesday, after testimony from an independent neurologist, Alameda County Judge Evelio Grillo ruled that the hospital can disconnect Jahi from life support Monday at 5 p.m. PT.

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OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) - A doctor at a California hospital says the facility won't cooperate with the transfer of Jahi McMath to another facility.
    
She's the 13-year-old girl who was declared brain dead after complications from a tonsillectomy. Her family didn't accept that, and went to court -- where both a doctor at Children's Hospital in Oakland and an outside expert appointed by the court both concluded that she can't recover because her brain isn't functioning.
    
Her family now wants to transfer her to a nursing home that is willing to keep caring for her.
    
But first, doctors at the hospital would have to surgically insert breathing and feeding tubes that would allow the new facility to keep her body functioning.
    
And the hospital's chief of pediatrics says doctors won't be doing that -- since the judge in the case didn't authorize or order any transfer or surgery. He says the hospital "does not believe that performing surgical procedures on the body of a deceased person is an appropriate medical practice."

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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