Long-Term Jobless Facing New Year Without Aid - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Long-Term Jobless Facing New Year Without Aid

Richard Mattos, 59, looks for jobs at a state-run employment center in Salem, Ore., on Thursday, Dec. 26, 2013. Mattos is one of more than 1 million Americans who will lose federal unemployment benefits at year's end. Richard Mattos, 59, looks for jobs at a state-run employment center in Salem, Ore., on Thursday, Dec. 26, 2013. Mattos is one of more than 1 million Americans who will lose federal unemployment benefits at year's end.

NBCNEWS.COM - Over a million out-of-work Americans will be ringing in the new year with a lot more uncertainty about the future.

Jobless benefits are slated to expire this weekend for 1.3 million people who receive the long-term federal aid payments that kick in after state insurance payments run out. The emergency benefits, which were instituted during the 2008 recession, allowed many individuals to receive benefits for up to 99 weeks while seeking work. While the program has been extended 11 times, lawmakers failed to reach a year-end agreement to maintain it.

The lapse means more than just fewer presents under the tree for unemployed people like Nancy Connelly-Cumming, a single mother who lives in Newbury Park, Calif.

She's been looking for work since losing her job at a nonprofit group in September 2012. "Absolutely, I couldn't have survived this long without an unemployment benefit," she told NBC News. "That was definitely what kept me going."

Connelly-Cumming said she's been applying for minimum-wage jobs and that she fears losing her home if she stops receiving her aid. "I don't want my children to know," she said. "They're 16 and 14 and they're pretty aware of what's going on but I don't want them to come to the realization that we might not have this home in a couple of months. I don't want them to know that. They don't have to worry. That's my job."

A bipartisan team of senators is pushing for a short-term fix after Congress returns to Washington in January.

Sens. Jack Reed, a Rhode Island Democrat, and Dean Heller, a Nevada Republican, are proposing a three-month extension of the benefits program that would also retroactively pay  the missed checks to the long-term unemployed. Reed said Thursday that he expects the first vote on that proposal to be held Jan. 6.

President Barack Obama called the two lawmakers on Friday from Hawaii to thank them for their proposal and to pledge to fight for its passage, the White House said. 

"This is just enough to keep people going -- in some cases, barely enough to keep people going," Reed said on a conference call with reporters. "Paying the rent, paying for fuel, going to the dollar store, not to upscale shops."

Deborah Barrett, a former accounting manager from Rhode Island who was laid off in February, joined Reed on the call.

"Without the continuation of federal unemployment insurance, I don't know how we'll be able to stay in our home or how we will get by until I land my next job," she said.

Democratic lawmakers had tried to extend the insurance benefits during the December fight over the federal budget, but they failed to insert even a temporary fix in the compromise legislation drafted by Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., and Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis.

After the passage of the budget deal, Obama called on Congress to pass the temporary extension as soon as they return from the holiday break.

"Because Congress didn't act, more than 1 million of their constituents will lose a vital economic lifeline at Christmastime, leaving a lot of job-seekers without any source of income at all," Obama said during a year-end press conference. "I think we're a better country than that. We don't abandon each other when times are tough."

Democratic Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid placed blame for the expiration of benefits squarely with Republicans.

"In the past, Democrats and Republicans have worked together to extend unemployment insurance for those still looking for work," Reid said in a statement last week. "Sadly, Republicans have now decided that they would rather let this program expire than cooperate with Democrats."

Republicans warn that the extension of benefits would increase the deficit by $25 billion, although some have said they are open to some kind of fix if supporters find a way to pay for it.

Other high-profile GOP lawmakers have suggested that continuing the aid could hurt workers in the long run.

"I support unemployment benefits for the 28 weeks they're paid for," Kentucky Republican Sen. Rand Paul said on "Fox News Sunday" earlier this month. "If you extend it beyond that, you do a disservice to these workers."

That's a characterization that recipients of the aid say is out of touch.

"My job search is my full-time job," said Barrett, who said she has been caring for her elderly mother while she looks for work. "I am sick and tired of people insinuating that folks in my position are not really trying to find jobs and are content to remain on unemployment. Such willful ignorance is deplorable."

Connelly-Cumming says she's waited for hours at coffee shops and grocery stores to speak to supervisors about jobs, with no success.

"When you've been out of work so long, you know, people begin to think, "'Well, maybe she doesn't want to work. Surely she can get a job at any of the fast food places,'" she said. "Well, I can't!"

Liberal groups hope to make the GOP pay a political price for its stance.

Progressive organization Americans United for Change has launched a national TV ad blitz slamming Republicans for their stance on the insurance payments.

"Who had a merry Christmas? The richest one percent," a voice in the ad booms. "Republicans in Congress made sure of that, protecting billions in taxpayer giveaways and for those facing tough times, Republicans stripped 1.3 million Americans of jobless benefits — folks who want to work but cannot find a job."

  • Most Popular StoriesMost Popular StoriesMore>>

  • Graco recalls 25,000 car seats

    Graco recalls 25,000 car seats

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 9:53 AM EDT2017-05-24 13:53:02 GMT

    DETROIT (AP) - Graco Children's Products is recalling more than 25,000 car seats because the harness webbing can break in a crash and may not keep children restrained. The recall affects certain My Ride 65 convertible seats made on July 22, 2014 with a code of 2014/06 on a tag that's on the webbing.

    >>

    DETROIT (AP) - Graco Children's Products is recalling more than 25,000 car seats because the harness webbing can break in a crash and may not keep children restrained. The recall affects certain My Ride 65 convertible seats made on July 22, 2014 with a code of 2014/06 on a tag that's on the webbing.

    >>
  • Violent Spokane drug trafficker gets 30 years in prison

    Violent Spokane drug trafficker gets 30 years in prison

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 12:00 AM EDT2017-05-24 04:00:27 GMT

    SPOKANE, Wash. - A 32-year-old Spokane man was sentenced to 30 years in prison Tuesday, after he pleaded guilty to drug trafficking charges, firearms offenses and threatening witnesses. The United States Attorney's Office reported Tuesday that Aren Lee Perryman, aka Filthy, pleaded guilty to Trafficking in Methamphetamine and Heroin; Possessing and Using Firearms in Connection with Drug Trafficking; and Intimidating and Threatening witnesses.

    >>

    SPOKANE, Wash. - A 32-year-old Spokane man was sentenced to 30 years in prison Tuesday, after he pleaded guilty to drug trafficking charges, firearms offenses and threatening witnesses. The United States Attorney's Office reported Tuesday that Aren Lee Perryman, aka Filthy, pleaded guilty to Trafficking in Methamphetamine and Heroin; Possessing and Using Firearms in Connection with Drug Trafficking; and Intimidating and Threatening witnesses.

    >>
  • $190 million settlement going to patients secretly recorded by gynecologist

    $190 million settlement going to patients secretly recorded by gynecologist

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 10:05 AM EDT2017-05-24 14:05:53 GMT

    BALTIMORE (AP) - More than 8,000 patients of a Johns Hopkins gynecologist accused of secretly recording pelvic exams will soon receive their share of a $190 million settlement. The Baltimore Sun reports the final allocation plan was approved Monday. Retired Maryland Court of Appeals Judge Irma Raker, who served as claims adjudicator in the class-action case, says the checks ranging from about $1,900 to nearly $28,000 sh...

    >>

    BALTIMORE (AP) - More than 8,000 patients of a Johns Hopkins gynecologist accused of secretly recording pelvic exams will soon receive their share of a $190 million settlement. The Baltimore Sun reports the final allocation plan was approved Monday. Retired Maryland Court of Appeals Judge Irma Raker, who served as claims adjudicator in the class-action case, says the checks ranging from about $1,900 to nearly $28,000 sh...

    >>
HD DOPPLER 6i
/
  • National NewsMore>>

  • TSA tests screening larger electronic devices separately

    TSA tests screening larger electronic devices separately

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 6:55 PM EDT2017-05-24 22:55:23 GMT

    Travelers at some U.S. airports are being asked to place electronic devices bigger than a cellphone in separate bins so that they can be examined more closely. The Transportation Security Administration said Wednesday that it has been testing the procedure at 10 airports for more than a year, and it may be expanded nationwide. The TSA says the approach is designed to "de-clutter" carry-on bags to make it easier for screeners to examine...

    >>

    Travelers at some U.S. airports are being asked to place electronic devices bigger than a cellphone in separate bins so that they can be examined more closely. The Transportation Security Administration said Wednesday that it has been testing the procedure at 10 airports for more than a year, and it may be expanded nationwide. The TSA says the approach is designed to "de-clutter" carry-on bags to make it easier for screeners to examine...

    >>
  • Graco recalls 25,000 car seats because of potentially unsafe harness webbing

    Graco recalls 25,000 car seats because of potentially unsafe harness webbing

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 6:19 PM EDT2017-05-24 22:19:33 GMT
    Graco is recalling more than 25,000 car seats because the harness webbing can break in a crash and may not keep children restrained. The recall involves eight different model numbers of the "My Ride 65" Graco car seat. The seats were made on July 22, 2014 and the code 2014/06 is on a tag that's on the harness webbing. According to documents posted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), agency tests discovered the webbing strength problem. Graco ha...>>
    Graco is recalling more than 25,000 car seats because the harness webbing can break in a crash and may not keep children restrained. The recall involves eight different model numbers of the "My Ride 65" Graco car seat. The seats were made on July 22, 2014 and the code 2014/06 is on a tag that's on the harness webbing. According to documents posted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), agency tests discovered the webbing strength problem. Graco ha...>>
  • PHOTOS: 'Doomsday' bunker community created in South Dakota

    PHOTOS: 'Doomsday' bunker community created in South Dakota

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 5:51 PM EDT2017-05-24 21:51:29 GMT

    EDGEMONT, South Dakota - Doomsday preppers are stepping it up a notch on their journey to surviving catastrophic destruction. They're heading to South Dakota where West River, a California-based company, is creating the largest shelter community ever made. Tucked away on hilly grass fields South of Edgemont, South Dakota, you'll find sphere-shaped bunkers covered in dirt and grass. Once you spot one, you'll quickly realize, they're everywhere.

    >>

    EDGEMONT, South Dakota - Doomsday preppers are stepping it up a notch on their journey to surviving catastrophic destruction. They're heading to South Dakota where West River, a California-based company, is creating the largest shelter community ever made. Tucked away on hilly grass fields South of Edgemont, South Dakota, you'll find sphere-shaped bunkers covered in dirt and grass. Once you spot one, you'll quickly realize, they're everywhere.

    >>
  • Top Stories from KHQHomeMore>>

  • Protesters hope to sweeten the deal with baked goods

    Protesters hope to sweeten the deal with baked goods

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 11:20 PM EDT2017-05-25 03:20:57 GMT

    SPOKANE, Wash. - Protesters in Spokane are trying a new way to get lawmakers attention when it comes to healthcare. Organizers say they've resorted to having a bake sale to help cover costs for seniors' Medicaid. People lined up outside of Cathy McMorris Rodgers' office for the sale in hopes to get her attention. KHQ reached out to McMorris Rodgers' office for comment but is still waiting to hear back. The main message people at the bake sale want to provoke is that l...

    >>

    SPOKANE, Wash. - Protesters in Spokane are trying a new way to get lawmakers attention when it comes to healthcare. Organizers say they've resorted to having a bake sale to help cover costs for seniors' Medicaid. People lined up outside of Cathy McMorris Rodgers' office for the sale in hopes to get her attention. KHQ reached out to McMorris Rodgers' office for comment but is still waiting to hear back. The main message people at the bake sale want to provoke is that l...

    >>
  • PHOTOS: Guns, drugs and money found in Spokane Valley motel room bust

    PHOTOS: Guns, drugs and money found in Spokane Valley motel room bust

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 11:15 PM EDT2017-05-25 03:15:29 GMT

    SPOKANE VALLEY, Wash. - Two men have been arrested and charged with a total of 26 felony and misdemeanor drug charges following a months-long investigation that led to a Spokane Valley motel.  Last week, detectives executed a search warrant at a room at the Motel 6 just off of I-90 and Argonne in Spokane Valley. 

    >>

    SPOKANE VALLEY, Wash. - Two men have been arrested and charged with a total of 26 felony and misdemeanor drug charges following a months-long investigation that led to a Spokane Valley motel.  Last week, detectives executed a search warrant at a room at the Motel 6 just off of I-90 and Argonne in Spokane Valley. 

    >>
  • New Spokane fire chief making response times top priority

    New Spokane fire chief making response times top priority

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 10:44 PM EDT2017-05-25 02:44:48 GMT

    SPOKANE, Wash. - When you're in trouble and every second counts - will help reach you in time?  In Spokane, the distance of just a few blocks can double the amount of minutes it takes for first responders to arrive.  But Wednesday, there's a new fire chief in town and he's making response times one of his top priorities.

    >>

    SPOKANE, Wash. - When you're in trouble and every second counts - will help reach you in time?  In Spokane, the distance of just a few blocks can double the amount of minutes it takes for first responders to arrive.  But Wednesday, there's a new fire chief in town and he's making response times one of his top priorities.

    >>