NEW: Applications For US Jobless Benefits Rise To 348K - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

NEW: Applications For US Jobless Benefits Rise To 348K

WASHINGTON (AP) - Weekly applications for U.S. unemployment benefits rose 19,000 last week to 348,000, the highest in about a month. But the broader trend in applications remains low.
    
The Labor Department says that the four-week average, a less volatile measure, increased just 750 to 333,000. The increase follows three weeks of declines.
    
The average is close to pre-recession levels and suggests that, despite last week's rise, layoffs remain low. But hiring will need to pick up to cut the still-high 6.7 percent unemployment rate.
    
Employers added just 74,000 jobs in December, the fewest in three years and far below the average of 214,000 added in the previous four months. Most economists forecast that hiring will rebound in January to roughly the 185,000 average monthly job gains of the past two years.

  • Most Popular StoriesMost Popular StoriesMore>>

  • Petition Calls for Changes to E-DUI Law

    Petition Calls for Changes to E-DUI Law

    Tuesday, July 25 2017 8:21 AM EDT2017-07-25 12:21:30 GMT

    Its only been in effect for a few days but some drivers in Washington are not happy with the new E-DUI law and want to make changes.

    >>

    Its only been in effect for a few days but some drivers in Washington are not happy with the new E-DUI law and want to make changes.

    >>
  • Coffee is life: Washington woman's hands-free drinking tip goes viral

    Coffee is life: Washington woman's hands-free drinking tip goes viral

    Monday, July 24 2017 7:30 PM EDT2017-07-24 23:30:43 GMT

    VANCOUVER, Wash. - With Washington's new distracted driving law in effect, holding a phone while behind the wheel could cost you. In addition to the cell phone crackdown, the law makes eating, drinking or other activities that could potentially take your hands off the wheel secondary offenses. That means if you run a stop sign while drinking a cup of coffee and get pulled over for running the stop sign, you could get a $99 fine for drinking that coffee.

    >>

    VANCOUVER, Wash. - With Washington's new distracted driving law in effect, holding a phone while behind the wheel could cost you. In addition to the cell phone crackdown, the law makes eating, drinking or other activities that could potentially take your hands off the wheel secondary offenses. That means if you run a stop sign while drinking a cup of coffee and get pulled over for running the stop sign, you could get a $99 fine for drinking that coffee.

    >>
  • 'Nurse in' held in support of breastfeeding Spokane mom

    'Nurse in' held in support of breastfeeding Spokane mom

    Monday, July 24 2017 11:44 PM EDT2017-07-25 03:44:04 GMT

    SPOKANE, Wash. - If you were near Physzique Fitness in South Spokane Monday morning, you may be wondering what all the mothers and babies were doing outside. We learned they were holding a 'nurse-in' to show their support for a mother who said she had a negative breastfeeding experience at the facility.

    >>

    SPOKANE, Wash. - If you were near Physzique Fitness in South Spokane Monday morning, you may be wondering what all the mothers and babies were doing outside. We learned they were holding a 'nurse-in' to show their support for a mother who said she had a negative breastfeeding experience at the facility.

    >>
HD DOPPLER 6i
/
  • National NewsMore>>

  • Brain disease seen in most football players in large report

    Brain disease seen in most football players in large report

    Tuesday, July 25 2017 12:39 PM EDT2017-07-25 16:39:13 GMT

    CHICAGO - Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease in nearly all of them, from athletes in the NFL down to high school. It's the biggest update on chronic traumatic encephalopathy (ehn-sehf-uh-LAH'-puh-thee), or CTE. The disease has been linked to repeated head blows and the results confirm that it can happen even in young players. 

    >>

    CHICAGO - Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease in nearly all of them, from athletes in the NFL down to high school. It's the biggest update on chronic traumatic encephalopathy (ehn-sehf-uh-LAH'-puh-thee), or CTE. The disease has been linked to repeated head blows and the results confirm that it can happen even in young players. 

    >>
  • Investor urges Barnes & Noble to seek a sale, shares jump

    Investor urges Barnes & Noble to seek a sale, shares jump

    Tuesday, July 25 2017 12:31 PM EDT2017-07-25 16:31:12 GMT

    NEW YORK - An activist investor has bought a "meaningful" stake in Barnes & Noble Inc. and is urging the bookseller to sell itself. Sandell Asset Management Corp. CEO Thomas E. Sandell, in a letter to Barnes & Noble's board, said "the public market for retail stocks is contributing to a risky and inhospitable environment" and the company would be better served if it were private or part of a larger company.

    >>

    NEW YORK - An activist investor has bought a "meaningful" stake in Barnes & Noble Inc. and is urging the bookseller to sell itself. Sandell Asset Management Corp. CEO Thomas E. Sandell, in a letter to Barnes & Noble's board, said "the public market for retail stocks is contributing to a risky and inhospitable environment" and the company would be better served if it were private or part of a larger company.

    >>
  • Rosenstein: "mutual respect" needed for confidence in police

    Rosenstein: "mutual respect" needed for confidence in police

    Tuesday, July 25 2017 11:49 AM EDT2017-07-25 15:49:13 GMT

    BALTIMORE - Deputy U.S. Attorney General Rod Rosenstein says building public confidence in law enforcement "is one of our great challenges."      He says police have a special responsibility to follow the law, and citizens have an obligation to respect the police. Rosenstein spoke Tuesday at the NAACP's national convention in Baltimore.

    >>

    BALTIMORE - Deputy U.S. Attorney General Rod Rosenstein says building public confidence in law enforcement "is one of our great challenges."      He says police have a special responsibility to follow the law, and citizens have an obligation to respect the police. Rosenstein spoke Tuesday at the NAACP's national convention in Baltimore.

    >>