Japan's new whaling plan - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Japan's new whaling plan

Posted: Updated:
Japan said its quota for hunting whales will be reduced this season Japan said its quota for hunting whales will be reduced this season
SPOKANE, Wash. - Japan has a new plan for hunting whales next year, but it doesn't involve ending the program. Despite being ordered by the International Court of Justice to halt whaling altogether, and dealing with whale advocates like the Sea Shepherd organization, Japan has announced that it will still hunt whales in the Antarctic ocean, but it will reduce its quota. 

Japan will submit its new plan to the International Whaling Commission. Japan has been issued a "scientific" permit every year from the IWC. Iceland and Norway are the only other countries who currently practice whaling, however their whaling is commercial, whereas Japan receives a "scientific permit" from the IWC. 

Japan claims its whaling in the southern ocean for scientific purposes, and their first study, the JARPA research plan, took 18 years and ended in 2005 with mixed results. During that time Japan says more than 6,700 minke whales were killed according to Australian news website news.com.au. During that time Australia argued that it was "practically unachievable" to estimate the probability that a whale would die from natural causes in any particular year. 

The second study, JARPA II, began during the 2005-2006 season and has no end date. Japan said the program is organized into six-year research phases, with a review to be held after each phase. 

During JARPA II, Japan hopes to archive four things: 

1. Monitor the Antarctic ecosystem for changes in whale numbers, prey numbers, the effects of contaminants, pregnancy rate, age at maturity and other factors.

2. Construct an “ecosystem model” that models competition between species, such as whether the overhunting of species such as fin and humpback whales led to more food for others, like the smaller minke whale. This could examine the effects of the resumption of commercial whaling.

3. A comparison of the numbers of whales based on historic information and yearly fluctuations.

4. Improve the management of minke whale stocks and analyses whether the catch quota is set too low.

But why kill the whales to conduct the research? Japan argues they need to kill the whales to collect ear plugs to determine the age of the whales, examine stomach contents and measure blubber. Originally Japan sought to kill 850 Antarctic minke whales, as well as 50 fin and humpback whales. On average, about 450 minke whales are killed year year and very few fin whales. In the past seven seasons there have been no humpback whales killed. 

Japan has blamed their low numbers on sabotage activities conducted by Sea Shepherd. 

So why kill the whales if their "scientific numbers" are not being met? In a 2007 unpublished paper submitted to the scientific community cited by news.com.au in April 2014, Japan stated "what research is costly and therefore lethal methods which could recover the cost for research (are) more desirable," and whale meat is an expensive delicacy in Japan.

Japan has said it will reduce its quota during this year's whale hunt, but seeing as how they were already falling short of their 850 minke whale quota, it is unknown however much of an impact their lower quota will have on the hunt. 

On Sea Shepherd's website, the organization cites an injunction imposed on them in December 2012 by the U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, saying the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society no longer participate in the Southern Ocean whale defense campaigns. However, the southern ocean whale defense campaigns are coordinated by Sea Shepherd Australia Limited, which is a separate organization. 

For more on Sea Shepherd, CLICK HERE: http://www.seashepherd.org/whales/

For more on the International Whaling Commission, CLICK HERE: http://iwc.int/home

  • Most Popular StoriesMost Popular StoriesMore>>

  • Can you prank your mom? 'The 25 pound turkey challenge'

    Can you prank your mom? 'The 25 pound turkey challenge'

    Wednesday, December 21 2016 2:36 PM EST2016-12-21 19:36:25 GMT

    KHQ.COM - Most mothers can only hope by the time their children grow up and move out of the house, they've learned all the necessary things to be a successful adult, including the basic knowledge that a turkey must be cooked in an oven, or perhaps in a smoker... NOT in a microwave. For this reason a new prank-challenge going around on Facebook is resulting in some hilarious text conversations between mothers and their grown children.

    >>

    KHQ.COM - Most mothers can only hope by the time their children grow up and move out of the house, they've learned all the necessary things to be a successful adult, including the basic knowledge that a turkey must be cooked in an oven, or perhaps in a smoker... NOT in a microwave. For this reason a new prank-challenge going around on Facebook is resulting in some hilarious text conversations between mothers and their grown children.

    >>
  • Spokane Police investigating death of man shot during sex

    Spokane Police investigating death of man shot during sex

    Wednesday, November 14 2018 8:45 PM EST2018-11-15 01:45:55 GMT

    SPOKANE, Wash. - Spokane Police are investigating the death of a man who reportedly shot himself in the head during sex. In a search warrant filed Nov. 8 in Spokane Superior Court, a detective wrote that around 2 a.m. on Nov. 4, police were called to a home in the 7800 block of North Morton Ave. after a woman said her partner shot himself in the head. 

    >>

    SPOKANE, Wash. - Spokane Police are investigating the death of a man who reportedly shot himself in the head during sex. In a search warrant filed Nov. 8 in Spokane Superior Court, a detective wrote that around 2 a.m. on Nov. 4, police were called to a home in the 7800 block of North Morton Ave. after a woman said her partner shot himself in the head. 

    >>
  • Santa Clara Police expanding resources in attempt to locate missing Spokane man

    Santa Clara Police expanding resources in attempt to locate missing Spokane man

    Wednesday, November 14 2018 7:48 PM EST2018-11-15 00:48:21 GMT

    SANTA CLARA, Calif. - Police in California are looking for a missing Spokane man who went missing during the San Francisco 49ers game Monday night.  32-year-old Ian Powers was last seen at the game with his family Monday night. He went to the restroom alone late in the game and hasn't been seen since, police told local media.  

    >>

    SANTA CLARA, Calif. - Police in California are looking for a missing Spokane man who went missing during the San Francisco 49ers game Monday night.  32-year-old Ian Powers was last seen at the game with his family Monday night. He went to the restroom alone late in the game and hasn't been seen since, police told local media.  

    >>
HD DOPPLER 6i
/
  • Regional NewsMore>>

  • Washington firefighter injured after being hit by car while battling Woosley Fire

    Washington firefighter injured after being hit by car while battling Woosley Fire

    Thursday, November 15 2018 9:25 AM EST2018-11-15 14:25:00 GMT

    VENTURA, Calif. - A firefighter from Washington suffered severe chest trauma after being hit by a car while battling the Woolsey Fire Thursday morning.  The California Highway Patrol says the firefighter, a man in his 40s, was deployed to California from South Kitsap Fire and Rescue to assist with the effort in battling the Woolsey Fire. He was hit near Deer Creek on Pacific Coast Highway. 

    >>

    VENTURA, Calif. - A firefighter from Washington suffered severe chest trauma after being hit by a car while battling the Woolsey Fire Thursday morning.  The California Highway Patrol says the firefighter, a man in his 40s, was deployed to California from South Kitsap Fire and Rescue to assist with the effort in battling the Woolsey Fire. He was hit near Deer Creek on Pacific Coast Highway. 

    >>
  • Seattle zoo to debut twin red panda cubs

    Seattle zoo to debut twin red panda cubs

    Wednesday, November 14 2018 5:00 PM EST2018-11-14 22:00:12 GMT

    SEATTLE (AP) - Visitors to Seattle's Woodland Park Zoo will soon be able to view the first successful birth of red pandas there in nearly three decades. The zoo plans to introduce twin red panda cubs at a public outdoor exhibit opening Nov. 23. Sisters Zeya (ZAY-uh) and Ila (EE-la) have been living in an indoor, climate-controlled area with their mom Hazel since they were born in June.

    >>

    SEATTLE (AP) - Visitors to Seattle's Woodland Park Zoo will soon be able to view the first successful birth of red pandas there in nearly three decades. The zoo plans to introduce twin red panda cubs at a public outdoor exhibit opening Nov. 23. Sisters Zeya (ZAY-uh) and Ila (EE-la) have been living in an indoor, climate-controlled area with their mom Hazel since they were born in June.

    >>
  • Divers to search bottom of Cascades waterfall for hiker

    Divers to search bottom of Cascades waterfall for hiker

    Wednesday, November 14 2018 4:22 PM EST2018-11-14 21:22:03 GMT

    STEVENS PASS, Wash. (AP) - Rescuers are searching in the water for a missing Chinese businessman who disappeared while hiking near a waterfall in the Cascade Mountains east of Seattle. King County Sheriff's Sgt. Ryan Abbot says investigators believe the 50-year-old man fell Tuesday while visiting the Deception Falls area. 

    >>

    STEVENS PASS, Wash. (AP) - Rescuers are searching in the water for a missing Chinese businessman who disappeared while hiking near a waterfall in the Cascade Mountains east of Seattle. King County Sheriff's Sgt. Ryan Abbot says investigators believe the 50-year-old man fell Tuesday while visiting the Deception Falls area. 

    >>