Mad Minute stories for Thursday, October 15th - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Mad Minute stories for Thursday, October 15th

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LOS ANGELES (AP) -- A Los Angeles doctor returning from her honeymoon ended up delivering a baby on an overseas flight when a fellow passenger went into early labor.
Dr. Angelica Zen, a resident physician at UCLA, says she didn't have much obstetrics training but didn't hesitate to help during the Air China flight from Taiwan to Los Angeles.
Zen tells Los Angeles news station KABC-TV that flight attendants acted as stand-in nurses, and most passengers were asleep until the cabin lights came on for the delivery.
The captain headed to the nearest airport, in Anchorage, Alaska. It's unclear if the birth occurred within a 12-mile radius of Alaska, which would make the baby a U.S. citizen by law.
Zen says the baby looked healthy and the mother was happy.

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CORONA, Calif. (AP) -- Two friends say they rescued a dog by rappelling more than 100 feet down a mine shaft in Southern California.
Michael Schoepf and Nick Gladden were off-roading last week near Lake Mathews, about 60 miles southeast of Los Angeles, when they discovered an abandoned mine and shined a flashlight into it. They saw a pair of eyes looking up at them.
Using sections of nylon rope tied together, Gladden carefully lowered Schoepf down. Schoepf tells the Press-Enterprise newspaper that the pit bull climbed right onto him and he brought the animal to the surface.
Keri Berka of Happy Tails Animal Hospital says it treated the dog for some scratches and traumatic glaucoma in its left eye, which could have happened if it fell down the shaft.
They hope to find the animal's owner.

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GRAPEVINE, Texas (AP) -- Some unusual travelers caused a delay for one American Airlines flight.
The travelers were hundreds of bees, found by a cargo crew under the right wing of a Boeing 767 that landed at Dallas-Fort Worth Airport Wednesday. The plane had arrived from Las Vegas and was headed to Frankfurt, Germany.
American spokeswoman Andrea Huguely (HEWG'-lee) said Thursday that a beekeeper and the airline's team did a "sweet job" taking care of the situation. No one was stung.
Huguely says the beekeeper safely removed the queen and the swarm. Cargo from Las Vegas was removed and workers started loading bags for the Frankfurt flight.
But the queen's scent apparently lingered. Bees quickly headed for the same spot.
The beekeeper returned and removed those bees, allowing the flight to eventually take off.

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SALT LAKE CITY (AP) -- A man searching for unique rocks in the Utah desert near the Nevada state line recently made an explosive discovery: a World War II-era bomb.
Craig Alvord told Salt Lake City news station KSL-TV this week that the 6-foot-long bomb is the best find he's made in more than 50 years of searching for stones.
Alvord notified the Air Force about the bomb. Though it wasn't discovered within base boundaries, Hill Air Force Base spokesman Richard Essary says its bomb squad detonated it Tuesday afternoon with C4 plastic explosives.
Essary said it appears to be a practice bomb from the World War II era. It may have ended up there because of a test range in the area.

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LARGO, Fla. (AP) - Officials say a Florida detective had been drinking before he attended a Mother's Against Drunk Driving conference and made disrespectful comments to another department's police chief.
The Pinellas County Sheriff's Office reports that Detective Michael Szeliga served a one-day suspension on Friday.
A report from an internal investigation says Szeliga was on duty July 24 when he attended the MADD event. The report says Szeliga made comments toward Gulfport police Chief Robert Vincent that were "considered disrespectful and overtly influenced by alcohol."
Other officers reported the comments to a Pinellas County Sheriff's Office supervisor, and Szeliga was banned from an awards ceremony.
The report says Szeliga acknowledged that he should not have consumed alcohol before attending the banquet.

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Ronny Scott Hicks was arrested Monday night for driving under the influence and obstructing traffic - but he wasn't driving a car!
Police say Hicks was riding in his motorized wheelchair when the call came in reporting an intoxicated man obstructing a bridge. When officers arrived they smelled an odor coming from Hicks and he was slurring his words. 
He did not follow police instructions and refused to take a breathalyzer test.
Police then took Hicks into custody where he also refused treatment for an open wound.
He has two prior convictions for DUI according to his arrest history.

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PENSACOLA, Fla. - The Escambia County Sheriff's Office says a Milton man tried to stop a driver who turned out to be a real deputy.
Sgt. Andrew Hobbs tells the Pensacola News Journal that 25-year-old Joshua Lynam had red and white flashing lights on the front of his pickup truck and pulled up behind a deputy Friday in an unmarked vehicle on Interstate 110 in Pensacola.
Hobbs says Lynam tried to perform a traffic stop on the deputy, who says Lynam was unable to produce his identification during the stop. Lynam was arrested and charged with impersonating an officer.
Authorities say Lynam is suspected of conducting stops on civilian vehicles from Santa Rosa County to Baldwin County, Alabama. It is unclear if Lynam has an attorney.

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The famous magician, Penn Jillette, of Penn and Teller, has a new trick up his sleeve. He's selling his Las Vegas home to The United Church of Bacon. 
Jillette has moved out of his home after 20 years, and he's selling it for $500,000.
He hopes to keep the estate as it is, so to afford his new home, he's selling the old one. 
The Bacon Church is legally registered by atheists. It has 12,000 members worldwide, and it's hoping to raise the money to by the home via IndieGogo.
The leader of the church says it'll be a gathering place for events. 

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An Italian court is sort of making things that are "not safe work" safe for work. 
A judge has ruled a worker at the Fiat plant in Sicily, can watch porn on his lunch break. 
The man was fired back in 2010, but a ruling in 2011 overturned that decision, and demanded he receive back pay. 
Now, Italy's highest court is agreeing with what the man says-- that he only saw tiny clips of a porn DVD on his break, rather than watching an entire adult film. 

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Navy veteran Sean Mace was visiting San Francisco during Fleet Week last October and had gotten what he thought was a great view to see the Blue Angels soaring across the sky.
He got to the San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park at the Fort Mason Center early to secure his spot hours before the show. He read a book. And he fell asleep.
He woke up - the next day in a hospital - after a 16-pound pine cone, or seed pod, fell from a tree at the park, crushing his skull and causing him to have permanent brain damage, short-term memory loss and other cognitive issues.
"He still has a tremendous degree of anxiety," Mace's San Francisco attorney, Scott Johnson, told NBC Bay Area on Thursday. "He's in constant fear of getting hit on the head. It's like a bowling ball falling from the sky and hitting you on the head."
A warning sign now appears outside the park warning of the giant seed pods from the Bunya Pines.
Johnson filed a lawsuit on Mace's behalf Sept. 4 in U.S. District Court in San Francisco, citing dangerous conditions of public property and negligence on the part of the U.S. Dept. of Interior, the National Park Service and the San Francisco Maritime National Historic Park.
The suit seeks $5 million in damages and alleges the park should have known about the danger, and at least should have posted warning signs, which have since been put up on bright, orange fences around the property.
Mace was injured Oct. 12, 2014 while visiting the Bay Area from Washington state after being laid off as a heating and air-conditioning worker, according to Johnson and the lawsuit. He was 50 at the time and had served in the Navy for two years in the 1980s.
Johnson said Mace used his time off to see the Blue Angels, the U.S. Navy's flight demonstration squad, who are in town again this week performing aerobatics in the sky.
According to the lawsuit, Mace went to the park and sat under a grove of coniferous Araucaria bidwillii trees, also known as bunya pines or false monkey puzzle trees. The trees are not indigenous to San Francisco and were planted by park staff several decades ago. Their seed pods can grow 35 centimeters in diameter and exceed 40 pounds in weight.
At some point, a 16-pound seed pod fell on Mace's head.
Mace was rushed to San Francisco General Hospital, where he had an emergency craniotomy, and then a right hemicraniectormy, the lawsuit alleges, resulting in traumatic brain injury and "likely irreversible cognitive deficits."
Mace is holding the park district responsible because there were no warnings posted about falling seed pods, no safety barricades and no netting, Johnson explained. Only afterward did park staff install safety barricades and signage, according to the lawsuit.
Johnson said appellate courts have found in the past other national parks are not immune to situations during which heavy snow causes tree branches to break or rockslides to fall, and that juries have decided who is at fault.
That's what he'd like for his client, too. But Johnson did say in all his research, he'd never found a case involving a falling seed pod that had crushed a park visitor's skull.
"I've not found another case that is factually similar," Johnson said. "This is relatively novel."
Mace has moved back to Washington state and is being cared for by family and friends.
He also filed a formal claim against the entities named in the suit, which, according to Johnson, has "not been rejected, accepted or even acknowledged."
Lynn Cullivan, spokesman for the San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park, said Thursday he had no comment on the pending litigation. Cullivan directed inquiries to the U.S. attorney's office, which did not immediately return requests for comment.

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