Mad Minute stories from Monday, October 26th - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Mad Minute stories from Monday, October 26th

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HAZLET, N.J. (AP) -- Police in a New Jersey town are asking the person who was expecting 50 pounds of marijuana in the mail to come claim the package.
The pot was delivered to a home in Hazlet. The homeowner called police, because it was addressed to someone who did not live at the residence.
Police say they were trying to figure out how to find the person when they opened the packages and discovered the marijuana in sealed bags. Police say the person is more than welcome to come to police headquarters to claim them.
In the meantime, officers are trying to find the shipper and intended recipient.

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COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) -- The Main Street bridge in Ohio's capital might appear to be decked out for Halloween, but officials say the extensive webs spotted by motorists at night are real.
The Columbus Dispatch reports the $60 million bridge connecting downtown Columbus and Franklinton is infested with thousands of web-spinning spiders of different varieties.
Ohio State University professor David Shetlar specializes in urban landscape entomology and estimates the bridge has 5,000 to 10,000 spiders.
Ohio Division of Wildlife naturalist Jim McCormac says that's evidence of good health for the Scioto (sy-OH'-tuh) River under the span.
A $35.5 million project narrowed the river for the creation of a 33-acre park with 800 trees and 75,000 plants. McCormac says that allows for more insects in the area, and the spiders followed their food.

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PUNXSUTAWNEY, Pa. (AP) -- Authorities say an elderly woman being robbed in a Pennsylvania parking lot shouted, "There's the police!" and the spooked suspect dropped his gun and ran away.
Punxsutawney police Chief James Borza says police are still searching for the robber, who approached the woman Friday morning outside the Uni-Mart store in the Punxy Plaza.
Borza says the man got nervous when the woman yelled. He dropped the gun, and she kicked it underneath a vehicle. The panicked suspect ran away.
Police say the weapon looked like a real pistol but fired only BBs.
Police are hoping someone who witnessed the attempted robbery might be able to identify the man.
Punxsutawney is about 70 miles northeast of Pittsburgh.

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PARKER, Ariz. (AP) -- A diver who felt he didn't get his fair share of the credit for discovering two fake skeletons sitting in lawn chairs at the bottom of the Colorado River has removed them from their watery grave.
Martin Sholl said he spotted the skeletons, adorned in sunglasses, flip-flops, a bikini and a rainbow-colored wig, tethered to lawn chairs while scuba diving in the river near the Arizona-California line in May, Today's News-Herald in Lake Havasu City reported Monday.
He alerted the La Paz County Sheriff's Office, and authorities discovered the skeletons were plastic.
"Skeleton tea party," Sholl said. "It was funny. The next day when my friend called and told me that the chaos I created was on every morning show in the country, I was shocked. ... I found out they didn't mention me at all."
Instead, Sholl said the media focused on La Paz County Deputy Curt Bagby, who led the recovery of the skeletons and investigated how they ended up in the river. When Sholl called a news outlet, he was told that Bagby wasn't sure he would want to speak.
"When you're dealing with the media (as a law enforcement officer), you can't assume that people want to be named," Bagby told the newspaper.
Since the skeletons were discovered, they have become an attraction to recreational divers.
But Sholl said he pulled them from the river Friday and put them on his balcony in Parker. He said he would return the skeletons after Halloween.
The sheriff's office says it wasn't illegal for Sholl to take the skeletons. But Chris Chambers of the Buckskin Fire Department said he hopes Sholl doesn't keep them long.
"Hopefully, he'll give the skeletons to the Buckskin Fire Department, and let us take them back down," Chambers said. "They're a really neat attraction."

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NORTH WEBSTER, Ind. (AP) -- Authorities say a northern Indiana woman is recovering after being shot in the foot by her dog.
And the dog's name? Trigger.
Indiana Conservation Officer Jonathon Boyd says 25-year-old Allie Carter of Avilla laid her 12-gauge shotgun on the ground without the safety on during a waterfowl hunt Saturday at Tri-County Fish and Wildlife Area.
Boyd says Carter's chocolate Labrador retriever, Trigger, stepped on top of the shotgun and depressed the trigger.
He says Carter was shot in the left foot at point-blank range, suffering injuries to her foot and toes. She was treated at two hospitals and released.
Tri-County Fish and Wildlife Area is about 140 miles north of Indianapolis.

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ROLLINSFORD, N.H. (AP) -- A New Hampshire school named to the National Register of Historic Places has an unusual feature on its grounds: the gravesite of a dog considered to be the father of the American Cocker Spaniel.
The marble block at the edge of the Rollinsford Grade School's playground marks the remains of Obo II, who was born in the United States in 1882 and died in 1895. He was the offspring of two cocker spaniel show dogs from England. His owner, James Willey, owned part of the land now occupied by the school.
The historic register application discusses the gravesite, which predates the school's construction but serves as a gathering spot for schoolchildren during recess and after school.
The designation was announced Monday.

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ATLANTA (AP) -- Police are searching for a woman who appeared to be wearing a "Beetlejuice" costume when she damaged a car in a hit-and-run crash in southeast Atlanta.
WSB-TV reports that surveillance video shows the suspect's car nearly flipped when it hit a Mercedes-Benz parked on the street. The video shows the driver getting out and inspecting the damage after the crash. A photo taken by a neighbor shows that the woman was wearing a costume from the film "Beetlejuice."
Minutes later, two other costumed men arrived and helped the driver push the woman's car off the parked Mercedes.
Hillary Meador, the owner of the Mercedes, says she fears the car is totaled and blames the driver for taking off.
The neighbor's photo captured a license plate number, which has been turned over to police.

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MADRID (AP) -- Spanish shepherds have led 2,000 sheep through the streets of Madrid in defense of age-old droving, grazing and migration rights that are increasingly threatened by urban sprawl and fenced-in pastures.
Tourists and children were surprised to see wide avenues blocked off in the Spanish capital to let the woolly parade - bleating loudly and clanking bells - cross the city, accompanied by sheepdogs.
Government agriculture spokesman Carlos Cabanas says the tradition is essential to "maintain native breeds that are in danger of extinction."
Shepherds have held the right since at least 1273 to use droving routes across land that used to be open fields before Madrid became a sprawling metropolis.
A shepherd handed over 150 maravedies - coins minted in the 11th century - to city officials for the crossing.

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RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) - A media report says a school principal in North Carolina has been charged with passing a stopped school bus.
WNCN-TV reports (http://bit.ly/1jInRmp ) that Bugg Magnet Elementary School principal Johneka Simmons Williams was charged April 27. Wake County School officials confirmed the charges.
An incident report by a Highway Patrol trooper said Williams denied having passed the school bus while the stop arm was out.
The 36-year-old Simmons said in a statement that she takes roadway safety seriously, "particularly when it involves students."
Williams could face a minimum fine of $500 if found guilty.

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DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) -- If you say you're unhappy in Dubai, the police may call to ask you why as part of a new survey.
The online poll, unveiled in recent days, comes as Dubai tries to break into the top 10 rankings of world's happiest cities by 2021, an effort in league with other lofty aspirations in this emirate, home to the world's tallest building.
The simple survey has users choose between a frown, a smile and an unimpressed straight line. The police say they will call those who say they are unhappy, which puzzles some observers, including William Davies, a senior lecturer at the University of London who recently published the book "The Happiness Industry: How the Government and Big Business Sold Us Well-Being."
"This looks like to me an attempt to try to slightly frighten people into A) replying to the survey question and B) replying to say they're happy because people really don't want to be rung up by the police with the question: 'Well, what's your problem?'" Davies said. "But I don't know. Maybe there's something sincere about it."
The effort to measure happiness can be seen in government offices across Dubai, one of seven of the United Arab Emirates. Small tablet computers placed next to civil servants allow citizens to provide instant feedback on their experience. Last year, authorities also began ranking municipal offices with a two-to-seven star system based on their customer service, part of Dubai's "smart government" push.
That happiness effort has included the Dubai police, most well-known abroad for some of the luxury cars employed in its fleet. Twitter messages from the police often include the hashtag "Your Security Our Happiness" in both Arabic and English.
At a recent electronics show, the Dubai police unveiled its happiness survey, saying it began Wednesday. It sent text messages to a number of Dubai residents including a link to a webpage showing a picture of Dubai's ruler, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, with the Burj Khalifa tower behind him. It asked one question in English and Arabic: "Are you happy in Dubai?"
In a statement, police said the survey received more than 200,000 responses in its first day, with 84 percent saying they were happy, 6 percent neutral and 10 percent unhappy. Police did not disclose how many text messages they sent.
But that wasn't all. Maj. Gen. Khamis Mattar Al Mazeina, Dubai's police chief, told local media that his officers would randomly call a selection of those unhappy to ask what was upsetting them.
"If the matter is under our jurisdiction, we will help them with it, but if it has to do with another government entity we will forward the issue to the concerned department," he said. He stressed police could not help with personal issues.
Police and Dubai officials did not respond to a request for comment from The Associated Press to discuss concerns about having police calling those who say they are unhappy.
The United Arab Emirates is ranked No. 20 out of 158 countries surveyed in the United Nations' 2015 World Happiness Report. Though coming in first in the Arab world, the United Arab Emirates hopes to break into the top 10 by 2021, which will mark the 50th anniversary of the nation's founding.
Davies warns, however, that solely focusing on happiness, either in Dubai or elsewhere in the world, could mask other issues.
"I think it diverts attention away from broader political or economic factors that might actually be ... problematic or unjust," Davies said. "It's possible to imagine a society which had great concern for happiness but very little for concern for say human rights or the rights of minorities."

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