Mad Minute stories from Wednesday, April 13th - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Mad Minute stories from Wednesday, April 13th

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DARTMOUTH, Mass. (AP) -- A calf that spent several days on the loose in Massachusetts is now a companion for a blind cow that recently lost a pig playmate.
The cow, Baby, lives at the Don't Forget Us Pet Us animal sanctuary in Dartmouth.
The unnamed calf had escaped from Robinson's Livestock and was returned to the farm last week. It had been destined for the slaughterhouse. But Jean Briggs saw stories about its escape, used her tax refund to buy the calf from Robinson's for $450 and turned it over to the sanctuary.
Deborah Devlin, who runs the sanctuary, says the timing is perfect. She says Baby's friend for the last eight years, Lulu the pig, died Sunday and that the cow was heartbroken.
The cow and the calf were introduced Tuesday.

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LONDON (AP) -- Think of it as Victoria's (and Albert's) secret. London's Victoria and Albert Museum has peeled back fashion's layers to expose everything from long johns to lingerie in "Undressed," an exhibition tracing the hidden history of underwear.
It's a story about covering up, and also about showing off. For centuries, people have worn undergarments for practical reasons of protection, hygiene and comfort - but there has always been an element of sexuality and drama as well.
"Something we wanted to correct in the exhibition is the assumption that all historical underwear is plain," researcher Susanna Cordner said Wednesday.
She said early underwear involved a simple cotton or linen garment next to the skin, "but then you would get little fashion flairs and little bits of exhibitionism."
"Any period of history with underwear there's an implied viewer - there's someone else in the room."
That viewer has often been presumed to be male and the wearer female. The show, which features more than 200 items made between 1750 and the present day, is dominated by women's undergarments: corsets and crinolines, stockings and shifts, chemises and stays.
They range from cotton drawers worn by the mother of Queen Victoria (the V&A museum is named for the 19th-century monarch and her husband), to a Swarovski crystal-studded bra and thong.
But there are men's unmentionables, too, including 18th-century shirts, which were considered underwear because they were worn next to the skin -only the collars and cuffs could decently be shown. More recent items include David Beckham boxer shorts and crotch-enhancing Aussiebum briefs.
Curators of the show, which opens Saturday, have emphasized the contribution of female designers and innovators such as Roxey Ann Caplin, whose "health corset" - designed to shape the body without crushing the internal organs - won a medal at the Great Exhibition of 1851.
Waist-constricting corsets run through the exhibition, in versions that range from functional to fetishistic. There are 19th-century models with whalebone stays, a modern-day red and black rubber corset by House of Harlot, and one worn by burlesque artist Dita Von Teese with a wince-inducing 18-inch waist.
Looking at the riot of corsetry, it's hard not to think "Hurray for the bra." The exhibition traces the history of brassieres, from their development as "bust supporters" in the 1860s through their wide adoption in the early 20th century to the introduction of Lycra in the late 1950s.
Edwina Ehrman, the exhibition's curator, said Lycra was "a fabulous breakthrough" - and a reminder that the evolution of underwear is a story of technology as well as creativity.
The exhibition reveals that the line between underwear and outerwear has long been blurred. Ehrman said people have been revealing their undergarments since at least the 16th century.
"Fast young women in the early 1800s would show the frills around their long underpants when they sat down," she said. "And stockings were a great way of showing your legs. ... So this trend has always been here, but we've carried it to extremes today."
Many of those extremes have been seen on fashion catwalks, and the exhibition's glass cases are full of wild and wonderful underwear-inspired designs: a sheer Liza Bruce slip dress famously worn by Kate Moss in the 1990s; a wispy lavender chiffon and lace gown by Ellie Saab; an extravagant gold-corseted Alexander McQueen gown.
Recent years have seen the line blur even further, as tracksuits, onesies and other loungewear moved from the living room onto the streets.
Ehrman said that after years of more and more exposure of the body, the next trend in underwear may involve "more covering-up."
But French lingerie designer Fifi Chachnil - whose signature Babyloo playsuit is on display in the exhibition - thinks we will always want to show off our skivvies.
"I don't like to make a bra that will not be seen," she said.
"I think life is a stage, and every woman is playing a part."
The "Undressed" exhibition runs from April 16, 2016 to March 12, 2017.

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MONESSEN, Pa. (AP) -- The grandson of a former state House speaker is quitting the race for the seat his grandfather once held, saying he now realizes he would hate the job.
The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review says 29-year-old Jim Manderino II announced on Facebook that he was quitting the Democratic primary race. Manderino's uncle and campaign manager, Jack Manderino, confirms the decision but says his nephew won't comment further.
Manderino's post reads: "I have realized that I will hate this job and I do not believe that will do our district very much good. It's just not for me."
His grandfather James Manderino died in 1989 shortly after he was elected House speaker.
West Newton Mayor Mary Popovich and Monessen businessman Charles Mrlack (MER'-lak) are still running to replace retiring state Rep. Ted Harhai. All are Democrats.

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ODESSA, Texas (AP) -- Police have arrested a woman suspected of stealing a ring from a corpse at a Texas funeral home in an incident captured on surveillance video.
Odessa police on Tuesday arrested 41-year-old Kalynn Homfeld on a charge of theft from a human corpse.
Police have said the ring stolen Friday was worth about $10. Investigators did not immediately say what led them to Homfeld or whether the ring was recovered.
Police on Monday released security video of a woman seen entering a viewing room at Sunset Memorial Gardens & Funeral Home, reaching into an open casket and fumbling to remove something from the female corpse.
The suspect drove off in a car. The theft was discovered Saturday.
Online Ector County jail records didn't yet list custody or attorney information for Homfeld.

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DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) -- A Des Moines school district spokesman has confirmed that ninth-grade girls hired a male stripper to perform at their school's synchronized swimming club's annual banquet.
District spokesman Phil Roeder (RAY'-dur) told The Des Moines Register on Wednesday that the Roosevelt High School principal will decide whether the girls violated school policies and punishment is merited.
A father of one of the team members says the girls employed the stripper as a joke, and that the stripper didn't totally disrobe at Friday evening's event at the Des Moines Social Club.
Roeder says a club employee asked the stripper to leave, deeming the appearance inappropriate for the students.
The Sharks synchronized swimming club is run and funded by students in grades nine through 12.

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VIENNA (AP) - Red-faced Austrian police are acknowledging that they published a photo of U.S. actor and TV producer Peter Marc Jacobson by mistake in their search for a suspected fraudster.
Police spokesman Roman Hahslinger said Wednesday that they circulated Jacobson's photo after it was provided by a woman who said she was defrauded of 46,000 euros (about $52,000).
He said the suspect apparently used a photo of Jacobson in a false identification document he gave the victim and "must look deceptively similar" to him. She wasn't identified in keeping with Austrian confidentiality rules.
Jacobson is best known as the co-creator of the popular U.S. sitcom "The Nanny." Hahslinger says he hasn't been in contact over the mix-up, adding Austrian police "cannot know every celebrity in the world."

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DULUTH, Minn. (AP) - Authorities say a driver was cited after he was clocked driving 171 mph in northern Minnesota.
The Star Tribune reports Deputy Chief Shawn Padden of the Hermantown Police Department stopped a Chevrolet Camaro that was clocked at 171 mph and later 148 mph north of Duluth.
Padden was working DWI enforcement Friday night on Highway 61 between Duluth and Two Harbors, and he gave chase and caught up to the driver.
The driver, a 36-year-old man, was cited for careless driving. Padden says the man didn't really provide a reason for speeding on the highway.

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SEATTLE (AP) - Stand on any block around lunchtime near Amazon.com's downtown Seattle headquarters and there are two common sights: people walking their dogs and people buying lunch at food trucks.
The scene offers a window into Seattle's infatuations with dogs (and cats), which outnumber children here, and the maturing roaming food truck market.
Now, one truck is combining both by catering to humankind's best friend.
"It kind of seems natural that now that we've conquered the people food truck market that we bring that to our faithful furry friends," Janelle Harding said.
Harding is a customer of The Seattle Barkery, a food truck that serves dogs and their owners in Seattle-area dog parks, office building parking lots, farmer's markets and private events. It rolled into operation 10 months ago.
"I think there is definitely a market for more things like that . where human and canine activities are combined. You don't want to always leave them at home or leave them in the car," said Dawn Ford, who owns and operates the truck with her husband, Ben.
By Dawn Ford's count, their truck is one of just a handful in the country that caters to canines. The concept is new and rare enough that dogless people occasional misunderstand and purchase a treat.
"They end up ordering something, and they seem weirded out by it," Ford said.
Popular offerings include air-fried chicken feet and duck neck, cupcakes with bacon rebranded "pupcakes," mini cheesy doughnuts, pumpkin pretzels and peanut butter-banana cookies.
"Peanut butter is like a must," Harding said after buying treats for her pug, Stella.
Ford worked at one of Seattle's dog-friendly bars, then became a dog walker and began cooking her own treats for customers following a rash of product recalls.
"All of our treats are soft," she said. "All of our treats aren't filled with ingredients you can't pronounce."
Giving dogs homemade treats rather than processed ones is deeply important to Ford.
"What we feed our animals reflects their health," Ford said. "Animals' lives are short. If we can feed them good quality products . why wouldn't you?"

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DEERFIELD BEACH, Fla. (AP) -- Firefighters have rescued a kitten that was trapped inside the wall of a South Florida home, bringing an end to a family's confusion about where a certain meowing sound was coming from.
Broward County Sheriff's Office Fire Rescue spokesman Mike Jachles says several firefighters on Monday safely removed the small gray kitten after cutting a hole through the wall in the Deerfield Beach family's living room. The kitten didn't appear to be injured.
It's unclear how the feline became trapped. Jachles says a neighborhood cat must have had a litter in the home's attic, with the kitten then somehow falling down into the wall.
The Miami Herald reports that the family adopted the kitten and named it Hugo, after one of the firefighter's who rescued it, Hugo de Almeida.

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PORTLAND, Maine (AP) -- Maine police are on the lookout for a prickly piece of art.
Officials said Tuesday that a porcupine sculpture was recently stolen from the grounds of the Portland International Jetport. It's one of 10 individual animal sculptures that are part of a work called Glimpse by artist Wendy Klemperer.
The metal animals are the first thing travelers see when arriving at the airport.
Animals include a deer and wolf. The porcupine that was stolen is nearly 3 feet long and is made from steel and repurposed nails.
A police report has been filed but the sculpture has not been recovered. Police are asking anyone with information about the missing sculpture to contact them.
 

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