The latest from Idaho's primary elections - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

The latest from Idaho's primary elections

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Officials in Idaho's most populated county are expecting just a 17 percent turnout among registered voters. Officials in Idaho's most populated county are expecting just a 17 percent turnout among registered voters.
BOISE, Idaho -

The Latest on Idaho's primary election (all times local):

IDAHO ELECTION RESULTS 

9:33 p.m.
    
U.S. Rep. Raul Labrador has won the Republican Party nomination for Idaho's first congressional district.
    
Labrador, 48, is currently serving his third two-year term in Congress, where he is on the Natural Resources and Judiciary committees.
    
He faced two challengers on the GOP ballot - Gordon Counsil, a landlord from Caldwell, Idaho; and Isaac Haugen of Santa Rosa, California. Out-of-state candidates can run for Congress in Idaho as long as they live in the state they hope to represent before the general election.
    
___
    
9:30 p.m.
    
U.S. Rep. Mike Simpson has won the Idaho Republican primary in his bid for a 10th term representing one of the most conservative states in the nation.
    
Simpson, who was first elected to Congress in 1998, easily defeated 52-year-old Boise resident Lisa Marie in the GOP primary.
    
The 65-year-old Simpson will now face Democrat Jennifer Martinez and Constitution Party candidate Anthony Tomkins in the general election this fall. Both Martinez and Tomkins ran unopposed in the primary.
    
___
    
9:05 p.m.
    
U.S. Sen. Mike Crapo has won the GOP nomination in Idaho's primary.
    
Crapo, 64, has already served three six-year terms representing Idaho in Congress and was running unopposed on the GOP ballot. He will face 63-year-old Democrat Jerry Sturgill, who also ran unopposed, in the general election this November.
    
Crapo serves on the Senate banking and finance committees. If Republicans maintain control of the Senate, Crapo could become the senior Republican for banking. He's currently the third most-senior Republican on financing.
    
Two other Idaho men are vying to be the third candidate in the general election for the Senate seat. Ray Writz of Coeur d'Alene and a man from Letha who legally changed his name from Marvin Richardson to Pro-Life are running against each other in the small Constitution Party primary.
    
___
    
8:30 p.m.
    
Polls are closed in southern Idaho, but voters in northern Idaho still have time to cast their ballots.
    
Idaho crosses two time zones, meaning results won't start trickling in until voting booths close at 8 p.m. local time.
    
In Ada County, Patricia Kopp said voting is an honor and a privilege.
    
"People are just going away every year and voting less and less and it's sad because it's something we need to do," she said.
    
___

5:15 p.m.
    
Ric Bridges, a retired staff administrator for a U.S. Department of Defense Army Reserve school, stopped by his polling place south of Boise Tuesday afternoon.
    
"It's our duty. It's everybody's responsibility to vote," Bridges said after casting his ballot. "If you don't vote you can't complain."
    
Bridges said he had real concerns about the presidential race but said there wasn't a particular race on the ballot in Tuesday's primary that he felt strongly about. He said he was frustrated, however, with the closed primary system.
    
"I don't think we should have to decide. We shouldn't have to associate with one party. I always vote for the best person, no matter what party they are in," he said.
    
He noted that turnout seemed low when he voted, though it could have been the early afternoon hour.
    
___    

2:45 p.m.
    
Officials in Idaho's most populated county are expecting just a 17 percent turnout among registered voters.
    
Ada County Chief Deputy Clerk Phil McGrane says that the county is expected to fall below the state average, but officials won't know for sure until the votes are counted after polls close at 8 p.m.
    
Fifteen counties still count at least some of their paper ballots by hand. Ada County is using optical scan equipment for counting the votes, which officials first used in the March GOP presidential primary and have fine-tuned on how to use for Tuesday's election.
    
Because the northern half of the state is in the Pacific time zone and the southern half is in the Mountain time zone, election workers won't start counting votes until 9 p.m. Mountain.
    
___
    
1: 30 p.m.
    
Voting sites in Boise are slowly beginning to see more people take part in Tuesday's primary election.
    
However, anticipated low voter turnout has forced some election workers to get creative in attracting people to the polls.
    
An election worker at one site in Boise stood outside waving at drivers while wearing a cardboard voting booth with a sign that read "Vote here." Officials hope the crowd will pick up once people get off work.
    
Voters have until 8 p.m. Tuesday to fill out their ballot. Furthermore, Idahoans can register to vote the day of elections.
    
For information about voting polls and voter registration, check out www.idahovotes.gov.

(Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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