Mad Minute stories from Thursday, June 2nd - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Mad Minute stories from Thursday, June 2nd

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COLUMBIA, Pa. (AP) -- The forgiving folks at the National Watch & Clock Museum have a timely reminder for visitors: Don't touch.
The museum in Columbia, Pennsylvania, shared surveillance video of a man who couldn't resist touching a sculpted, wooden clock on Tuesday. The clock then fell off the wall, breaking into many pieces, as the befuddled patron swiftly walked away, apparently hoping he wouldn't be noticed.
"We cringe every time something like this happens," museum director Noel Poirier said.
The museum isn't pressing charges and didn't try to identify the man or the woman he was with.
"Posting the video is not an effort on our part to shame anyone," Poirier said. "We did not want them to feel bad or persecuted as a result. We want to use (the video) to educate. When you come to a museum, play by the rules."
The clock was made by Minnesota artist and clockmaker James Borden and has hung in the museum for more than 20 years. Its design won a national award in 1994.
Poirier wouldn't say how much the clock is worth. He said it was damaged in the fall, though "not beyond repair." Borden has agreed to fix the clock for the museum, "so it's not the end of the world," Poirier said Thursday.
The clock doesn't always run because of its design, which is more sculpture than clock, but Poirier is happy to set the device in motion if asked.
Although the museum has displays that are hands-on, they're clearly labeled, Poirier said.
"We have more problems with adults than we do with children," he said. "Adults seem to feel slightly more entitled to touch things."

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NEW YORK (AP) -- A rare postage stamp stolen in 1955 has been returned to its rightful owner in New York City.
But the mystery surrounding the so-called Inverted Jenny remains: Who stole it and three other such stamps at a convention in Virginia?
On Thursday at the World Stamp Show, a man from Northern Ireland who inherited one of the stolen stamps from his grandfather watched as it was handed to officials of the Bellefonte, Pennsylvania-based American Philatelic Research Library.
A total of 100 Inverted Jenny stamps were printed in 1918, erroneously depicting an airplane printed upside-down.
Of the four stolen in 1955, three have now been recovered.
The stamp transferred Thursday surfaced at a New York auction house in April.

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SUGAR LAND, Texas (AP) -- While you might think a bronze statue immortalizing two girls taking a selfie would be met with approval on social media, that doesn't appear to be the case.
The city of Sugar Land, Texas, says the statue recently installed in a city plaza is meant to depict a common activity in the area. It says the donated sculpture was reviewed and approved by a pair of citizen committees and the City Council.
Social media hasn't been as welcoming. The stature has drawn the ire of many on Twitter .
Others don't seem to think it's so bad. They're signaling their approval by, of course, posting selfies with the sculpture .

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NORWICH, Conn. (AP) -- Police in Connecticut say they were able to apprehend a suspect they were running after thanks to a passing motorist who saw the foot pursuit and offered an officer a ride.
The Bulletin of Norwich reports that two Norwich officers on Wednesday pulled over a vehicle that was suspected of being involved in an earlier road rage incident.
The driver fled on foot and officers gave chase.
During the pursuit, an unknown citizen driving by offered a ride to one officer, who accepted. The officer was dropped off in front of the suspect and arrested him.
The anonymous driver then left the scene, but police issued a public thank you.
The suspect, meanwhile, faces a charge of driving a motor vehicle while under suspension, and drug offenses.

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HOPLAND, Calif. (AP) -- Authorities say a Northern California woman was arrested after she scooped up a fawn from a rural road and attempted to sell the animal on Craigslist.
The San Francisco Chronicle reports Thursday that 28-year-old Lacy Jean David of Ukiah posted the ad Tuesday asking $300 for the baby deer. She posted a photo with the ad.
State game wardens set up a sting to meet her and buy the deer. She says she picked up the creature in Mendocino County at about 2 a.m. It is illegal to pick up a fawn and sell it online.
David was arrested at the sting on an unrelated warrant for failure to appear in a prior drug case. She was released on bail later in the day.
The fawn is in good health and remains at a rehabilitation facility.

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QUINCY, Mass. (AP) -- A 5-year-old Massachusetts boy may have a future in law enforcement.
The Quincy Police Department on Wednesday posted to Facebook a recording of a 911 call the boy placed to report his father had run a red light.
The boy tells a dispatcher: "Daddy went through a red light." He then describes the vehicle and says it was "in the brand-new car, my mummy's car." He doesn't identify himself.
When the dispatcher asks the boy what happened next, he says they went to the car wash.
Without missing a beat, the dispatcher asks to speak to the boy's father, who gets on the line and says, "Oh, no."
The dad then apologizes for the boy's call.
The dispatcher and the dad share a laugh before the dispatcher lets the dad off the hook.

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WASHINGTON (AP) - U.S. officials say a high-level Defense Department official has been placed on administrative leave following his arrest for stealing license plates in a dispute over a neighborhood parking permit.
The officials said Bryan Whitman is on leave pending the results of a legal review.
Whitman, a civilian leader in the Pentagon's public affairs office, is under review by human resources officials; the review includes questions about his ongoing access to classified information, the officials said. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the matter publicly.
Whitman was charged with three counts of theft for stealing license plates from a car belonging to a neighbor's nanny and leaving a threatening note. The charges, which came to light Wednesday, stunned Pentagon officials and co-workers and raised questions about a potential Defense Department investigation.
Whitman has a security clearance, and under Defense Department regulations, he is required to notify officials if he is arrested. He did not respond to a request for comment. He is the principal deputy assistant secretary for public affairs and is currently overseeing the Pentagon's community relations office.
In an agreement reached with the Superior Court in Washington, D.C., the charges against him will be dropped if he pays $1,000 in restitution, does 32 hours of community service at a local food bank, stays away from the neighbors and the nanny and doesn't get into trouble for 10 months.
According to U.S. officials, Pentagon leaders didn't learn about the problem until they were contacted Wednesday by The Washington Post, which was first to report the arrest.
The dispute began April 4, when Whitman allegedly put a note on a car belonging to the nanny, which was parked in his neighborhood on Capitol Hill.
"I know you are misusing this visitor pass to park here daily. If you do not stop I will report it, have your car towed and the resident who provided this to you will have his privileges taken away," the note on her white Lexus said, according to the police report.
Two days later, both of her license plates were taken. The family she works for replaced the plates and two days later the rear license plate was taken. The family then mounted a camera outside that covered the street and sidewalk, and on April 21 the rear plate was taken again, but this time they had it on video.
The Associated Press is not identifying the nanny or the family who were the apparent victims of the theft.
Terry Owens, a spokesman for the District Department of Transportation, said it's legal for nannies or babysitters to use visitor parking passes at any time.
According to the police report, officers reviewed the video - which showed a man moving around the nanny's car and crouched down at the rear of the vehicle - and then went to Whitman's house in late April with a warrant. The report said that, when asked about the license plates, Whitman went to his car and retrieved them and turned them over to the police.
Whitman was charged on May 5, and on Tuesday he reached a deferred prosecution agreement with the court for the restitution and community service.

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SALT LAKE CITY (AP) - A Brigham Young University physiology professor will no longer be offering students the chance to drink what they think is real urine as part of a class demonstration.
Assistant professor Jason Hansen has been told to just explain the lesson next time rather than offering a mixture of water with vinegar and food coloring and calling it urine, Dixon Woodbury, chair of BYU's department of physiology and developmental biology, said Wednesday in a statement.
Hansen will not be disciplined.
Hansen said in a statement that he didn't mean to offend anyone when he recently offered a student the chance to drink urine in class to learn about the principles of hydration and dehydration. The woman didn't know it was fake urine. The second-year professor says he has done the same exercise in the past with no complaints.
"This is usually a fun way to teach this concept to the class," Hansen said in an email.
This year, however, an anonymous student reached out to Salt Lake City TV station Fox 13 to complain the lesson went too far.
No other students or parents have complained, Woodbury said.
The concept of the demonstration has been used for years in physiology courses to teach about critical aspects of kidney function and urine formation, Woodbury said.
"The apparent requirement of drinking someone else's urine is inappropriate, but it was neither required nor actually urine, so was considered a learning opportunity," Woodbury said in an emailed statement.

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ALLISON PARK, Pa. (AP) - Talk about an unplayable lie: A snapping turtle has nested in the sand trap at a Pittsburgh-area golf club, forcing officials to rope off the hazard.
Officials at Wildwood Golf Club in McCandless Township tell KDKA-TV that a golf pro saw the turtle laying the eggs in the sand bunker on Monday morning.
Officials don't want to disturb the buried eggs which, coincidentally, are white, round and about the size of golf balls. That's why they've roped off the area and are telling players to drop their ball elsewhere before continuing play.
Experts at the Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium say the sand trap is a logical spot for the eggs to be laid, sunny, warm and easy for the mother to dig in and bury the eggs.

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A woman looking to take a picture of an elk during a visit to Yellowstone National Park got a lot closer than she expected when it charged at her.
Video posted on Facebook by tour guide Jody Tibbitts captures audio of him trying to warn the woman to back away before the elk rushes at her. The elk ended up stopping short and backing away.
A National Park Service spokesman tells ABC News those looking to get close-up photos of animals can endanger themselves and wildlife.
The park service says visitors should stay at least 100 yards from bears and wolves and at least 25 yards from all other wildlife.

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