Mad Minute stories from Thursday, July 21st - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Mad Minute stories from Thursday, July 21st

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MORGANTOWN, W.Va. (AP) - Lap dances at a West Virginia strip club will help pay for flood relief.
The Blue Parrot Cabaret club in Morgantown is offering the lap dances for charity from Wednesday through Saturday. The club plans to donate portions of the proceeds for flood relief efforts in hard-hit southern West Virginia.
The lap dances cost $20 per song, with payments accepted by cash or credit card. Club co-owner John Baron said in a telephone interview Tuesday the club hasn't determined yet which charity will get the money.
Baron said reaction to the promotion so far has been positive. The club also will accept donations from anyone who doesn't want the lap dance.
Floods in late June killed at least 23 people in West Virginia. Baron said a friend's mother lives in Greenbrier County, where 15 people died.
Baron said the floods triggered memories of the November 1985 floods that remain the state's costliest natural disaster, with more than $570 million in damage and 47 dead.
"These are the people of our state. We want to help them," Baron said. "We feel that the people down in the southern part of the state need all the help they can get."
In the past the club has conducted holiday food and toy collections for local charities.
"There are probably a lot of people in the state who may not necessarily like what we do, but at the end of the day, we are all West Virginians," Baron said. "And we're going to help everyone we can."

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LA CROSSE, Wis. (AP) - An Illinois woman who lost nearly $12,000 at a La Crosse mall has her money back.
The La Crosse Tribune reports ( ) that 73-year-old Norberta Pickett of Rockford and her husband had hoped to buy a camper while riding motorcycles around Sparta earlier this month. On the last day of their trip they visited Valley View Mall. Pickett forgot her purse in a Hallmark Store restroom.
An employee found the purse. When no one claimed it by Friday, she checked it for an ID and turned it over to police. Officers discovered $11,773 in cash as well as gift cards and photos of Pickett's children and grandchildren inside.
Police contacted Pickett, who drove to La Crosse to retrieve the purse. She said she was most upset about losing her photos.

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WASHINGTON (AP) -- Animal rescue officials recovered armloads of cats and kittens from a vacant house in the nation's capital after a real estate agent found two women living there illegally and called police.
Spokesman Matt Williams with the city's Humane Society and Animal Rescue League says the two women were squatting in the northwest Washington home with more than 60 cats. About 20 of the animals were inside the house, which was filled with feces, and the rest were being kept in a U-Haul van parked out back.
Williams says animal rescuers removed 44 cats and kittens on Tuesday, but the two unidentified women had already disappeared with about 20 others.

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SYDNEY (AP) -- A flight from Sydney to Thailand was diverted to Indonesia to offload a group of drunken Australian traveling companions who started throwing punches at each other, officials said on Thursday.
Jetstar Flight 27 was carrying 314 passengers when it diverted to Bali on Wednesday night after the six who were traveling together to the tourist island of Phuket became "extremely disruptive among themselves" and refused requests from the crew, the Australian budget airline said in a statement.
The airline said all six were forced off the plane, but Bali officials said only five men were held by airport security and faced deportation to Australia.
It is not clear what happened to the sixth passenger.
Bali airport manager Trikora Harjo said an investigation determined that the only reason the men started fighting was because they were under the influence of alcohol.
"They were not seriously injured, just bruised," Harjo said.
Nine Network television showed video of one of the men with a black eye being escorted by security guards from the plane. Nine reported another man had bled heavily in the plane from a broken nose.
Bali airport official Yusfandri Gona said the men would undergo health checks before they are deported.
"They drank too much beer and liquor on the aircraft. Some of them started fighting, yelling and punching each other and ignored other passengers and the cabin crew's requests for calm and order," Gona said.
Nine reported the fighting broke out five hours into the nine hours and 20 minute flight to Phuket. Bali is less than seven hours from Sydney.
"The other customers on board supported the decision to offload the group in Bali and thanked the crew," Jetstar said.
The plane continued on to Phuket an hour after landing in Bali.
The airline did not say whether it will pursue the troublemakers for the cost of the diversion.

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DIX HILLS, N.Y. (AP) -- Authorities in New York say a woman has been ticketed for driving in a carpool lane with a fake passenger - who even had a briefcase.
The driver was pulled over during Thursday morning rush hour on the Long Island Expressway in Dix Hills. Suffolk County police say the woman was driving in a high-occupancy vehicle lane, which is restricted for travel during busy times unless a driver has a passenger.
Police say the dummy was made with a pile of clothes topped with a baseball hat.
The fake front seat passenger even had a briefcase.
However, the dummy was not wearing a seat belt in photos issued by police.

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GLENWOOD SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) -- A Colorado bed and breakfast owner armed with just a length of rope helped save a black bear with a giant plastic container stuck on its head.
Jim Hawkins got his lasso around the animal's midsection on the first throw. He said Thursday that he and the bear "did a rodeo thing for a while" before the animal figured out that Hawkins was the reason it couldn't run away.
That's when the bear went after Hawkins, leaving him with scrapes and a wound that needed stitches. It then scrambled up a tree, remaining there until officials arrived.
Carbondale District Wildlife Officer John Groves tells the Post Independent newspaper that officials tranquilized the bear and cut the container off its head.
It was released in the mountains and is expected to survive.

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WASHINGTON (AP) -- In Mozambique's woodlands, the sound of sweet evolution is at work.
Over the centuries, through genetic and cultural adaptation, humans and a wild bird species have learned to work together with a simple sound: "Brrr-hm." When human honey-hunters make that call, the bird called the honeyguide does its namesake job with incredible accuracy, leading people to hidden bees' nests.
Scientists put this ancient practice to the test and it passed with high flying colors. When biologists compared the "brrr-hm" sound to other sounds, the traditional sound sent the honeyguides to hidden bees nest three times more often than the control sounds, according to a study in the journal Science Thursday. When you make the right noise, you end up with honey 54 percent of the time, compared to 16 percent of the time with the wrong noise.
"It's an exchange of information for skills," said study lead author Claire Spottiswoode, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Cambridge. It happened to her personally. She failed to find bees nests until her companion made the right noise and was rewarded with a honey that's "very rich, very flavorful. It catches at the back of the throat."
The honeyguide has a unique ability to find bees' nests. Scientists aren't quite sure how it works, but it likely has to do with an advanced sense of smell, Spottiswoode said. Still, there's a problem: These nests are stuck in trees that are difficult for the birds to reach. Even worse, the bees sting the birds, sometime to death.
The people of the region, who make a living on the honey, have axes and other tools that can get at those nests and they use smoke to chase the bees away, reducing the stinging problem. But the people, called the Yao, can't easily find the hidden bees.
But over the centuries the honeyguide and the Yao people have developed the call. When honeyguides hear the call they also make a noisy response and then fly from tree to tree, leading the honey hunters to the bees. The humans open up the tree, smoke out the bees and take the honey. The birds eat the wax, Spottiswoode said.
While humans train dogs and other animals to hunt, this is different because those animals are domesticated and these are wild birds, not trained specifically by humans, Spottiswoode and other scientists said.
Richard Wrangham, a Harvard University evolutionary biologist who wasn't part of the study, said this is the most advanced bird-mammal relationship in the world.
It's clear that the birds have adapted in an evolutionarily way through natural selection, but for people the arrangement is probably more cultural, Spottiswoode said.
In Tanzania, humans use a different sound successfully with honeyguides, said Spottiswoode and Yale's Brian Wood.
Despite their sweet name and helpfulness to humans, the honeyguides aren't so benevolent. The honeyguides are ruthless parasites , depositing their eggs in other species' nests and then, when the baby honeyguide hatches, it kills its foster siblings with a beak that has a hook at the end.

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MOORE, Okla. (AP) -- An Oklahoma woman is recovering from third-degree burns to her thigh caused by hot pennies that spilled in her sport utility vehicle on a scorching summer day.
Melissa Sechrist says a cup of spare change spilled onto her seat in Moore, Oklahoma, last week, and the scalding-hot pennies came into contact with her leg. She tried icing the wound, but she went to a hospital over the weekend after the pain didn't subside.
Sechrist tells Oklahoma City television station KWTV that the coins caused third-degree burns on the back of her thigh. She says it's still painful to walk, sit or lie down because of the injury.
According to the National Weather Service, the heat index was 104 degrees on the day Sechrist suffered the burns.

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BOOTHBAY HARBOR, Maine (AP) -- It's not common for senior citizens to move from Florida to Maine, but Larry the Lobster's life depends on it.
The decades old, 15-pound lobster has been spared from the kettles of a Sunrise, Florida, restaurant and will head to the Maine State Aquarium for retirement.
WPLG-TV reports a rescue group stepped forward to save the venerable crustacean. It's estimated to be between 60 and 110 years old.
Maine Department of Marine Resources spokesman Jeff Nichols says the lobster will be quarantined to protect other marine life. The aquarium will assess its health, but has no plans beyond that.
Animal welfare group People For The Ethical Treatment of Animals is pushing for the lobster to be released into the wild so it can live out its "golden years at sea."

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BERLIN (AP) - German police say they've arrested an 18-year-old man who was wanted for evading a prison sentence after he ventured out to play the newly launched "Pokemon Go" smartphone game with friends.
Police in Trier, on Germany's western border, said the group's "peculiar behavior" as they played the game in the city on Friday prompted officers to check their papers.
The 18-year-old initially gave a false identity but police quickly established that there was an arrest warrant out for him. He was detained and is now serving a six-month prison sentence he had previously avoided serving - police wouldn't specify for what.
The app was officially rolled out in Germany earlier this week.
The game has sparked a frenzy of players wandering around U.S. cities hunting for "pocket monsters" to fight.
 

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