Mad Minute stories from Thursday, August 18th - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Mad Minute stories from Thursday, August 18th

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ROME (AP) -- Marine biologists in southern Italy have separated conjoined twin loggerhead turtles and released the surviving newborn into the Mediterranean Sea.
The release occurred this week along the beaches of Campania where the endangered loggerheads come to nest every year.
Fulvio Maffucci, marine biologist at Anton Dohrn Zoological Station, said Wednesday there had been only seven known births of conjoined twin loggerheads in the Mediterranean. He said the fact that one survived was "extraordinary." The smaller twin was dead and significantly underdeveloped compared to the larger twin.
Maffucci said: "After the removal of the dead brother from his chest, he crawled from the nest and he's been released in the wild without any help."
In addition to the twins, one of the hatchlings this year also included a rare albino loggerhead.

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BOISE, Idaho (AP) -- A young Hunter S. Thompson went to Idaho to write about Ernest Hemingway and decided to take a piece of his hero home with him - a set of trophy elk antlers.
More than half a century later, the gonzo journalist's wife returned the antlers to Hemingway's house in the mountain town of Ketchum.
"One of the stories that has often been told over the years is the story of Hunter S. Thompson taking the antlers," said Jenny Emery Davidson of Ketchum Community Library. "These are two great literary figures who came together over the item of the antlers."
Davidson was there on Aug. 5 when Thompson's widow, Anita Thompson, gave back the antlers she says her husband regretted taking. Hemingway's house is owned by The Nature Conservancy, which has an agreement with the library to help catalog and preserve items in the residence where the author took his own life.
In 1964, Hunter Thompson, then 27, came to Ketchum when he was still a conventional journalist. He had not yet developed his signature style, dubbed gonzo journalism, that involved inserting himself, often outrageously, into his reporting and that propelled him into a larger-than-life figure.
Thompson was writing a story for the National Observer about why the globe-trotting Hemingway shot and killed himself at his home three years earlier at age 61. Thompson attributed the suicide in part to rapid changes in the world that led to upheavals in places Hemingway loved most - Africa and Cuba.
Even Ketchum, which in the 1930s and 1940s attracted luminaries such as Gary Cooper, had fallen off the map of cafe society by the late 1950s, Thompson wrote.
In the story, later collected in his book "The Great Shark Hunt," he noted the problem of tourists taking chunks of earth from around Hemingway's grave as souvenirs.
Early the piece, he wrote about the large elk antlers over Hemingway's front door but never mentioned taking them.
For decades, the antlers hung in a garage at Thompson's home near Aspen, Colorado.
Davidson said they made their way back to Idaho after historian Douglas Brinkley, who spoke at the library in May and was familiar with the antler story after interviewing the writer, contacted Anita Thompson. She called the library on Aug. 1.
"She gave a little background about the antlers and said she'd love to return them," Davidson said.
They have since been shipped to a Hemingway grandson in New York who wanted them, she said. It's not clear if the antlers came from an elk killed by the author, who was a noted big game hunter, or if they were a gift.
Anita Thompson and Sean Hemingway didn't respond to emails or phone messages seeking comment from The Associated Press.
Not long after the visit to Hemingway's house, Thompson developed the journalism style that took him into the dangerous world of the Hells Angels motorcycle gang and would make him famous.
Like Hemingway, Thompson ended his own life by shooting himself, dying in 2005 at age 67 at his Colorado home.

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OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) -- Two masked intruders were captured after entering the Oklahoma Capitol, rummaging through a senator's office and splashing around in a second-floor bathroom.
The intruders? Raccoons.
Senate officials say security footage shows the pair sneaking down a Senate hallway on Wednesday night and exploring an office. A cleaning crew trapped the raccoons in a bathroom and called animal control officers.
Oklahoma City spokeswoman Kristy Yager says the two raccoons are being taken to a wildlife sanctuary south of Oklahoma City.
The Oklahoma Highway Patrol, which provides security for the Capitol, says it's not sure how the raccoons made it into the building. Patrol Capt. John Paul joked: "They didn't have any ID on them, no known address."

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LONDON (AP) -- It was a sticky situation.
A British hospital discovered it had become home to more than 100,000 bees when patients noticed honey dripping down the walls.
Beekeepers were summoned to Rockwood Hospital in Cardiff, Wales, after the discovery last month, and found a large colony of bees in the roof above a ward.
Abigail Reade of the Tree Bee Society charity said Thursday that honey was "dripping through the ceiling tiles, it was dripping down the walls."
She said the hive had gone unnoticed for up to five years. It's thought warm summer weather melted some of the wax, releasing the honey.
Beekeepers from the society removed some 70,000 bees by cutting a hole in the roof. A second colony was removed from another part of the hospital this week.

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GENEVA (AP) -- Officials at CERN, home to the world's largest particle accelerator, say they've launched an internal investigation over a "spoof" video filmed on its campus appearing to mimic a human sacrifice.
Shot from a building at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, known as CERN, the video shows hooded people in a courtyard before the cape of one woman is lifted off her shoulders. After she lies down, a hooded person approaches and appears to stab her with a knife. An off-camera voice reacts with an expletive.
On its website, CERN called the video "a work of fiction showing a contrived scene."
Scientists pour in from around the world for round-the-clock work at CERN's accelerators around Geneva. CERN said sometimes accredited personnel "let their sense of humor go too far."

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BOSTON (AP) -- These married couples really do make beautiful music together.
Seventeen married couples are scheduled to perform Saturday at the Boston Symphony Orchestra's summer home at Tanglewood in western Massachusetts in what's being touted as the most wedded pairs to perform together in the orchestra's 134-year history.
The couples performing the first two acts of the Verdi opera "Aida" include the orchestra's music director, Andris Nelsons, and his soprano wife, Kristine Opolais, in the title role.
Two members of the cast - Violeta Urmana, a mezzo-soprano who plays the role of Amneris, and her husband, Alfredo Nigro, a tenor who plays the messenger - are also joined in matrimonial bliss.
Six of the couples perform with the orchestra, and eight are in the Tanglewood Festival Chorus, the orchestra's all-volunteer choir. The BSO's associate concertmaster and his freelance violinist wife are also performing.
"I think it's pretty cool," said Cathy Basrak, a viola player with the BSO who's been married to timpanist Tim Genis since 2003. "But it's not surprising. I always knew there were a lot of married couples in the BSO, and it makes sense that the chorus has so many married couples as well."
Chorus members Livia Racz and her husband of nearly 20 years, Bruce Kozuma, estimate they have shared the stage hundreds of times. But they've never been part of something like this.
"Everything just sort of came together for this weekend," Racz said.
Like most couples, shared interest is what brought the pair together, and it's what helps keep their marriage strong. They know the dedication each has for what is essentially a hobby, as both have demanding jobs - Kozuma as a systems analyst with the Broad Institute at MIT and Harvard and Racz as a research group director at MIT.
It can also be the source of some minor marital tension.
"If we happen to be driving in the car together and discussing a piece, sometimes she'll say, 'No, no, no! You're not doing it right!'" Kozuma said with a chuckle.
Getting so many married couples on stage together wasn't planned, BSO officials said. While going over the roster of more than 240 performers, several staffers noticed that the event was also a celebration of conjugal bliss.
Music is better when it's a family affair, Nelsons said.
"This family feeling generally is something that we value so highly," he said. "Without question, such a family-like atmosphere adds levels to our music-making together."

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ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) - It's harvest time for New Mexico's green chile. And some residents say peels from the state's staple crop are creating a hot mess.
The KOAT-TV in Albuquerque reports that some trucks transporting green chile are dropping peels in Albuquerque's South Valley. Residents say the peels are sloshing and are spilling out of the trucks and onto roads.
Drivers say one intersection even is covered in green chile.
Andres Garcia says the wet peels are dangerous. He told KOAT-TV he recently had to hit his brakes at a stop sign because his truck kept sliding.
The Bernalillo County Sheriff's Office says it is a misdemeanor crime for any truck to spill loads.

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ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) - A New Mexico woman is facing charges after police said she tried to free her boyfriend from a patrol car by trying to crash into it.
KOB-TV in Albuquerque reports 26-year-old Tommianne Patten chased an Albuquerque patrol car on Monday following her boyfriend's arrest for domestic violence.
According to police, Patten drove up behind the police car and tried to ram it on Interstate 40.
Authorities say the officer tried to flee Patten, but she pulled up alongside him and tried to crash into him again.
Police say Patten later crashed into an unmarked police vehicle with an officer inside at Albuquerque police headquarters.
She faces aggravated assault on a peace officer with a deadly weapon charge.
It was not known if she had an attorney.

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OMAHA, NE (WCMH)-A dad in Nebraska learned to watch what he eats after ingesting four marijuana brownies and having to call paramedics.
The Omaha World-Herald reports that the 53-year-old man was unloading groceries Tuesday and apparently found some brownies in the back of the car, which his adult children had used earlier in the day. He ate four of them.
The man's wife told police that he started having "bad anxiety" while they were watching television. She tried to call her children to ask, but couldn't reach them.
Police showed up at the house, followed by one of the children, who told them he was "pretty sure" the brownies only had pot in them. The son told police the brownies belonged to his siblings.
Paramedics were called to the scene, and noted that the man's vital signs were normal, the World-Herald reports. However, the man was behaving strangely, crawling on the floor, swearing, and calling the family cat a bitch.
The man reportedly told paramedics he felt like "he's trippin'."
The man did not want to go to the hospital, so paramedics helped him to his bedroom. The man and his wife were told to call 911 again if he started feeling worse.
Police have not filed any charges over the edibles.

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NEW YORK (AP) -- It's Donald Trump like he's never been seen before.
Life-size naked statues of the Republican presidential nominee greeted passers-by in New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Seattle and Cleveland on Thursday. They are the brainchild of an activist collective called INDECLINE, which has spoken out against Trump before.
In a statement, the collective said the hope is that Trump "is never installed in the most powerful political and military position in the world."
The statues were created by an artist in Cleveland. They are of a stern-faced Trump with his hands folded over a bulging belly. Some parts of male genitalia are visible while others seemingly are missing.
"It is through these sculptures that we leave behind the physical and metaphorical embodiment of the ghastly soul of one of America's most infamous and reviled politicians," INDECLINE said in its statement.
Trump's campaign declined to comment on the statues.
A statue in Union Square quickly drew the attention of people before it was removed by the city's parks department. INDECLINE said statues on the West Coast were still in place.

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