Mad Minute stories from Tuesday, February 28th - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Mad Minute stories from Tuesday, February 28th

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SEATTLE (AP) -- A taco truck that became stranded in a massive Seattle traffic jam came to the rescue of hungry drivers by opening up and serving lunch on the interstate.
A tanker truck carrying propane rolled over on Seattle's Interstate 5 on Monday morning, shutting area roads for about eight hours amid concerns about a hazardous materials spill.
While waiting in the jam, Rachel McQuade tells The Seattle Times she spotted someone walking back to her car with a to-go box of food. She says she then headed over to the Tacos El Tajin truck herself and ordered two steak and two chicken tacos for her husband.
El Tajin owner Thomas Lopez tells the newspaper that he and his employees "are ready to serve food, everywhere."

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NEWPORT BEACH, Calif. (AP) -- It's not unusual for a surgeon to save another doctor's life.
But Dr. Colleen Coleman did so by going under the knife to help an ailing colleague who desperately needed a kidney.
Coleman donated to Dr. Brian Dunn, an anesthesiologist she works with at Hoag Hospital Newport Beach whose kidneys failed from chemotherapy he received as a teenager to treat a stomach tumor.
Coleman came through after one donor withdrew her offer and Dunn's doctor advised him against accepting a kidney from a patient with Lou Gehrig's disease.
"I thought, it's not going to happen," Dunn told The Orange County Register.
He had received a kidney from his mother when he was 25, but donated kidneys don't last forever. In late 2015, his health was failing and he could hardly keep pace with his young daughter.
"I started dragging," he said. "Holy crap, I felt bad."
He started dialysis in April and needed to go through the process four times a day to purify his blood. He referred to the time-consuming and tiring process as his prison.
Coleman's intervention also almost didn't happen after an initial screening erroneously said she wasn't a match. Only after the testing company called back in June to say it made a mistake did Coleman learn she was a match.
Her initial eagerness to help out, though, was tempered with second thoughts and fears until she considered Dunn's 6-year-old daughter.
Coleman's grandmother had died of kidney failure when her mother was a 6-year-old girl. "I didn't want his daughter to grow up without a dad," Coleman said.
The surgery last month was a success. Coleman went to see Dunn afterward.
"I wanted to make sure my kidney could pee," she said.
Dunn, 45, said he felt vibrant and grateful three weeks later.
In a note sent to Coleman thanking her for her sacrifice, Dunn credited her with persevering to help him.
"Monday, January 30th is a day I'll remember forever," he wrote. "It's the day that someone did something truly selfless for me. Colleen, you are an answer to prayer and an amazing example to everyone around you."
Coleman, 51, who returned to work to find flowers, a cake and people hailing her as a hero, said she was moved by the note from Dunn.
"I did not understand how impactful it would be to help someone in this way," Coleman said. "There is a benefit to giving. But hero is a very embarrassing word."
In addition to the scars they both bear in their midsections from the surgeries, they also share other reminders of their bond.
Dunn gave Coleman a set of kidney-shaped Tiffany earrings to thank her. She gave him a Tiffany money clip in the shape of a kidney.

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NORWALK, Conn. (AP) - A Connecticut man whose car was stolen from his driveway took the law into his own hands.
Norwalk police say the man reported his car stolen at about 8 a.m. Tuesday. The Hour reports that the man told officers he had inadvertently left the vehicle unlocked with the keys in the ignition the night before.
About five hours later, the man called police again to say he had spotted his stolen car with two men in it and was tailing it.
Possibly realizing they were being followed, the men drove into a parking lot, where they were blocked in by the owner.
The two men jumped out of the car and took off on foot.
Police are still looking for them.

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A Homestead man is facing a grand theft charge after he allegedly stole, then sold, his neighbor's pet monkey.
Oscar Leiva, 21, was arrested Sunday night and booked into Miami-Dade jail, where he was being held on $5,000 bond Monday, records showed. Attorney information for Leiva was not available.
Officers responded to the neighborhood in the 400 block of Southeast 8th Street after the monkey's owner, Vanessa Di Gennaro, reported it missing, according to an arrest report.
Di Gennaro said she was cleaning her home and had left the monkey, Zoe, in her backyard. When she went to check on her, the monkey was missing.
"She's my baby, she's my kid. She goes everywhere with me. I love her to death," Di Gennaro said.
Di Gennaro said she had posted fliers in the area and received a call from a witness who told her the monkey, a white tufted marmoset valued at $2,900, was at Leiva's home, the report said.
Officers found Leiva, who said the monkey was in his kitchen and he thought it was a rat so he caught it. He said he realized it was a monkey so he put it in a cage in his room, the report said.
Leiva said the monkey climbed on his shoulder and he tried to grab it but it tried to bite him, the report said. He said he fell asleep and the monkey ran away.
But the witness said Leiva told him he had stolen the monkey and sold it for $900, the report said.
The suspect's mother believes he's innocent. She told NBC 6 in Spanish that her son does not have the animal.
"I'm surprised that there are people that are that evil on one hand and also people that are good that say 'hey, this is where she is,'" Di Gennaro said.
Di Gennaro said she's worried about Zoe's safety and is offering a $2,000 reward for her return.
"She's a very delicate animal on top of everything, she's not like a dog that you can leave alone. They get into things, they hurt themselves really easy. You have to watch them," she said.

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London, England - Contestants dressed up in costume raced through London while flipping pancakes on Tuesday as part of an annual tradition.
They did it to celebrate Shrove Tuesday, also known as Pancake Day - the day in February or March immediately before Ash Wednesday, the first day of Lent.
It's traditionally when pantry items like eggs and milk were used up ahead of the 40 day fasting period of Lent.
In the UK, pancake racing has become part of that tradition with costumed contestants required to flip the pancake several times without dropping it.
According to one legend, it began in 1445 when a woman heard the church bell while she was making pancakes and ran to the church still dressed in her apron and holding a frying pan. 
People of all ages took part in the London race - now in its 24th year.
A close final had to be decided by a photo finish.
The winning team included contestants James Ferignor and Alex Lopez dressed as Batman and Darth Vader.

"We had a game plan yeah," said Ferignor. "We've been training for quite a couple of weeks now. We woke up this morning, had a good breakfast. I know you did as well. Did some stretches"
"I had some pancakes, just to get in the mood," Lopez explained. "The key is to toss it and then start running. Don't run while you toss because otherwise it might get left behind."

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Federal officials are investigating after a city banned a small horse a man says is his service animal needed on walks to improve his health.
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development tells NBC affiliate KING-TV that it is investigating Benton City's actions as a possible fair housing violation.
Tim Fulton said that his horse, Fred, senses when Fulton is about to fall, gets in front and lets Fulton lean on him for support.
"I fall down from time to time," Fulton said. "It's really a pain."
Fulton said Fred is slightly taller than a large dog but much stronger and able to give Fulton the stability he needs.
But Benton City officials say Fred isn't allowed in a residential zone and has issued Fulton a $100 fine. So Fred is staying at a ranch outside city limits.
"Mr. Fulton has not met the requirements for the City to allow him to keep a miniature horse as a service animal in a residential zone...," said the city's attorney, Eric Ferguson of Kerr Law Group, in a statement.
Ferguson also questioned the validity of the documentation for a service animal, noting it was from a nurse practitioner basing the recommendation on what Ferguson said wasn't firsthand knowledge.
Ferguson also said Fred is a Shetland pony, not a miniature horse. Ferguson said allowing Fred to remain would "fundamentally alter the nature of the City's zoning scheme with no facts to show that it is 'necessary' under the law."
David Carlson, director of legal advocacy at Disability Rights Washington, said the city's decision is illegal.
"That is discrimination, and the city is violating the federal law designed to protect someone with a disability," Carlson said. "There are good reasons why someone might use a small horse as a service animal, and if someone does that, you can't say: 'Well you can't live in our town.' "
Washington animal law attorney Adam Karp said he believed the city's argument "would fail in court."

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ISLIP TERRACE, N.Y. (AP) - Emergency crews arriving at the scene of a vehicle crash on New York's Long Island came upon something they had never seen before: a car standing upright against a tree.
Authorities tell WCBS-TV that the 18-year-old Central Islip woman driving the car was traveling on the Southern State Parkway when she crashed near an exit in Islip Terrace. The car went into the woods and came to rest standing vertically on its front end while leaning against a tree.
Firefighters stabilized the teetering vehicle by securing it to the tree with chains and strapping then used a ladder to rescue the injured woman from the car. She was treated at a hospital for non-life-threatening injuries.
State Police charged her with unlicensed operation of a vehicle.

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Limon, CO - The campaign may be over, but the biggest campaign sign yet has just been plowed into Colorado ranch-land.
Drone footage captured the mile long "trump" sign. 
The rancher who plowed the 800 ft long letters into his land, Doug Koehn, says he was frustrated at some of the negativity coming from opponents of President Donald Trump.
He says he wants to show that even though Colorado went for Hillary Clinton, the president has healthy support in parts of rural Colorado.
He also says if President Trump sees the sign flying into Denver, he's welcome to stop by the ranch.
"They can even land if they're in Marine One," Koehn said. "I'll buy him a beer. I'd love to shake his hand."
He says the whole job took only about two hours to complete. 
He plans to leave it up until he needs to plow the rest of the field in the springtime.

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(Sky News) Two bandy teams have been ordered to replay a match in which they scored 20 own goals between them amid allegations of match-fixing.
Bandy, a free-flowing sport considered a form of hockey, is a combination of field hockey, ice hockey and football and is little-known outside Scandinavia and Russia.
Baikal-Energiya beat Vodnik 11-9 in their Russian Super League game, but all of the goals went in at what's normally called the 'wrong' end.
With 22 minutes of the 90 remaining, Sunday's game in Arkhangelsk, northwest Russia, was locked at 0-0 when Vodnik's Oleg Pivovarov suddenly scored three own goals, putting the visitors 3-0 up.
Not to be outdone, Baikal-Energiya responded with nine rapid own goals of their own, making it 9-3 to Vodnik, before Pivovarov rescued the points for the opposition by notching another eight goals, all into his own team's net.
Now, the All Russian Bandy Federation has alleged the teams were fixing the match, nullified the result and ordered a replay at a neutral venue on Friday.
Punishments will be decided on Tuesday, when the governing body meets the teams, who have both apologised to their fans.
Bandy is a combination of field hockey, ice hockey and football
League officials blamed Vodnik who, had they won, would have faced the league's reigning champions Yenisey Krasnoyarsk in the upcoming play-offs, while Baikal-Energiya were already guaranteed to play a much weaker team.
Federation president Boris Skrynnik accused Vodnik of starting the farce in order to "play against a convenient team".
He claimed Baikal-Energiya joined in after its players "decided to have some fun".
The game is played on ice by teams of 11 players each, who use sticks similar to hockey sticks to propel a small rubber ball into a goal on a large outdoor rink roughly the size of a soccer pitch.
This is not the first time a sporting event has been scandalised by players allegedly trying to fix results on the pitch.
Eight female badminton players from South Korea, China and Indonesia were disqualified from the 2012 Olympics after they deliberately made basic errors in group stage games in an attempt to fix the draw for the next round.
But they've all got nothing on Madagascan football side Stade Olympique de l'Emyrne, who scored a record 149 own-goals in a match in 2002 as a protest against what they felt was unfair refereeing.

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(fox) Wires and tubes and lots of glass and plastic, that's what TV recyclers usually find inside old sets. But for one worker in Canada, the discovery of a secret box helped jar the memory of a forgotten inheritance.
More than $100,000 in cash was found inside a television that was being processed at an Ontario recycling plant in January, CTV Network reported this week. The money was found inside a cash box, stashed into the TV console.
"There was like, four stacks of $50 bills, and I knew it was a large amount of money," Rick Deschamps, general manager of the plant told CTV. Deschamps praised his employee for being honest and turning the box over to authorities.
Along with the money, there were documents that led police to the unidentified 68-year old owner of the TV, who told investigators that he gave the set to a friend 30 years ago. He had apparently forgotten that the money was inside.
His plan at the time was to give the money to family members as an inheritance, police said.
The friend finally got rid of the television, not knowing that his trash would turn out to be a friend's treasure.
Now that the man has been reunited with his cash, police had this advice.
"Hopefully he's put it in a savings account now," Barrie Police Const. Nicole Rodgers said.
 

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