Mad Minute stories from Monday, May 8th - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Mad Minute stories from Monday, May 8th

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ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) -- A New Mexico man arrested for breaking into his mom's house to steal her traditional New Mexican stew won't face charges after all.
Last week, a state district judge dismissed charges against Jonathan Carlos Ray, who was charged in 2015 for the theft of his mother's posole (poh-SOH-lay). The judge says the only witnesses to the alleged crime were Ray and his mother.
Police say Ray was arrested after he ignored his mother's orders to stay away from her posole and ran off with the holiday dish.
According to a criminal complaint, Ray sent his mom a text message saying he wanted some of her posole. She told him no.
The complaint says the mother later found her gate and garage broken and a pot of the posole missing.
Posole, a hominy, is a traditional soup or stew made with pork or chicken popular in Mexico and the American Southwest.

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PATERSON, N.J. (AP) -- A New Jersey mayor facing corruption charges has hosted a cruise to raise money for his legal fees.
NorthJersey.com reports that Paterson Mayor Joey Torres charged $150 to $250 per person for a Hudson River harbor cruise Thursday evening.
Torres says about 300 people attended the event. He did not say how much money was raised.
Torres and three city public works officials are charged with conspiring to have city employees work overtime at a warehouse leased by the mayor's family. He has pleaded not guilty.
The mayor says he plans to hold another legal defense fundraiser in July and plans to run for re-election next year.

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GREENFIELD, Wis. (AP) -- A group that skipped out on a tab has returned to pay up after the suburban Milwaukee bar used Facebook shaming in an effort to collect.
The three men and two women, all in their 20s, reportedly left without paying a $105 bill Friday night at The Brass Tap in Greenfield.
The bar posted a warning on Facebook for the group to "come back in and pay or prepare to be prosecuted." Local TV picked up fuzzy surveillance photos.
Four of the five members of the group returned to the bar Sunday morning and paid up. Police say the other was working but would come in later to pay his share.
Greenfield Police Officer David Vitek tells the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel the bar's owner no longer wants to pursue charges.

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JACKSONVILLE, N.C. (AP) - Life is arriving fast for a North Carolina university student who becomes a graduate, Marine Corps officer and a newlywed within three days.
The Daily News of Jacksonville reports that Isaiah Levia's big changes are lined up next weekend.
Levia takes his commission as a Marine Corps officer next Saturday, the same day his fiancé graduates from Coastal Carolina Community College in Jacksonville. The next day, Levia graduates from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The day after that, the Richlands native is marrying his sweetheart, Audrey Marovitch.

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NEW YORK (AP) - New York's American Museum of Natural History has an intriguing proposition: Bring in anything you have and don't know what it is, and scientists will try to identify it.
Saturday is what the museum calls its annual "Identification Day" devoted to helping people break the mystery of their specimens such as shells, rocks, insects, feathers and bones and more.
The explorations will take place in the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Hall, named after the U.S. president with a passion for natural history.
Items identified in previous years have included a whale jawbone, a fossilized giraffe vertebra and a 5,000-year-old stone spear-point from Morocco.
Visitors are also invited to explore rarely seen objects from the museum's collections.

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NORTHPORT, Mich. (AP) - An elected official in a small Michigan town is serving a 90-day jail sentence after he was accused of forging documents to impress an overseas mistress.
Charles Rogers is a member of the village council in Northport, north of Traverse City. Authorities say he created divorce documents with forged signatures of court officials and sent them to a woman in London.
The Traverse City Record-Eagle says the woman contacted Rogers' wife, who reached out to police. Rogers pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor and began a jail sentence in February in Leelanau County.
Northport Village President Phil Mikesell says Rogers plans to be released in time for the board's June meeting.

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ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) -- Authorities say a man stole a minivan at an Atlantic City hotel when the driver mistook him for a valet.
Atlantic City police say 35-year-old city resident Steven Jacobs was arrested around 7 a.m. Sunday after officers stopped the vehicle. They say a loaded handgun was found on the floorboard.
Authorities say the car had been taken Saturday at the Wyndham Skyline Tower, shortly after the minvan's owner arrived at the site and voluntarily gave Jacobs' his keys
Jacobs is charged with theft of movable property and a weapons offense. It wasn't known Monday if he's retained an attorney.

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SALEM, N.H. (AP) - A Salem business owner upset about people illegally parking in his lot faces criminal charges after police say he took matters into his own hands.
Police say 36-year-old Yogesh Patel called police Friday night to complain about multiple cars parked outside M&N Borderline Discount by people who weren't visiting his store.
The responding officers found 10 vehicles that had one or more deflated tires. They say a review of security footage showed Patel and another employee drilling holes in more than 20 tires after calling police.
Both men were charged with falsifying physical evidence and conspiracy to commit criminal mischief. Phone numbers for them could not be located Sunday and it was unclear whether they have attorneys.

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NOGALES, Ariz. (AP) - A shipment of Ford Fusions traveling by rail from Mexico to Minnesota has been found to have marijuana hidden inside the vehicles.
The shipment contained 15 Ford Fusions and each one had marijuana concealed in the trunks' spare-tire space, the Arizona Daily Star reported Thursday.
A truck driver in a Minnesota rail yard had discovered the pot in two vehicles, which prompted a search of the other 13.
Each of the first two cars had 40 pounds (18 kilograms) of marijuana molded into the shape of spare tires and tucked inside plastic wrap, aluminum foil, coffee grounds and garbage bags.
Authorities had to search as far as 170 miles (274 kilometers) away from the original report to find all the cars
Fusions are made at the Ford plant in Sonora, Mexico, and some are shipped by rail through the border crossing in Nogales, Arizona.
Police do not have any suspects, said Steve Linders, a spokesman for the St. Paul, Minnesota, police.
A spokeswoman for Ford said the company is aware of the situation and cooperating with the investigation, but declined to provide any more information
In a separate incident on March 10, railroad police notified the police department in Dilworth, Minnesota, that marijuana was found in a Ford Fusion from Mexico.
Police searched more than 400 other vehicles in the Dilworth rail yard and found 217 pounds (98 kilograms) of marijuana packaged and sealed to look like spare tires in seven new Fusions from Mexico, Dilworth Police Chief Ty Sharpe said.
At the Arizona-Sonora border in May 2015, the Mexican military found 430 pounds of marijuana in the spare-tire spaces of 14 new cars inside a rail car in Nogales, Sonora.

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ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) - New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo isn't afraid of ghosts, but spooky thuds still keep him awake at night when he stays at the governor's mansion in Albany.
The Democrat told a Long Island crowd Thursday that during legislative sessions he spends evenings unsettled by unexplained noises in the 161-year-old mansion near the Capitol building.
"Now, I don't believe in ghosts and I'm a big tough Italian guy," Cuomo said "But I'll tell you - it gets creepy in that house and there're a lot of noises that go on, and you are very alone."
The governor, who spends most of his time at his family home in Westchester, has mentioned apparitions in the reputedly haunted mansion before. In an April speech in Harlem, he said he spends the eerie, sleepless nights reading about past governors.
The only known death in the mansion was in 1909, when the Rev. David C. Hughes, the father of Gov. Charles Hughes, died from a "stroke of apoplexy," according to state archives.
New York State Capitol assistant curator Stuart Lehman said historians have no reason to believe Hughes had unfinished business that would cause his spirit to remain in the house, but Albany's state buildings brim with reports of paranormal activity.
Lehman, who leads popular Capitol Hauntings tours every Halloween, said visitors and staffers have reported supernatural sounds and sightings in other state buildings: the sound of jangling keys from the spirit of a watchman who died in the Capitol's 1911 fire and the ghost of a benevolent librarian who resides in the state education building.
Former Gov. David Paterson, who spent some time in the mansion before Cuomo took office, said he also believes the house is haunted. Paterson told the New York Post that one evening, staff told him the sound of a vase smashing was caused by the spirit of the building's original groundskeeper.
Paterson said his 5-year-old nephew also told him he could feel an invisible hand guiding him up the mansion's stairs.
"Governor Cuomo should be relieved," Paterson said. "It's a friendly ghost, like Casper."
 

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