Marine units keep boaters safe on Lake Coeur d'Alene - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Marine units keep boaters safe on Lake Coeur d'Alene

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COEUR D'ALENE, Idaho -

Lake Coeur d’Alene and summer go well together.

People from far and wide come to take in the sights and sounds, but if you’re not careful, you could get hurt.

Sunday morning, Kootenai County sheriffs deputies responded to a boat that had hit the rocks and flipped, thankfully deputies say no one was injured.

“We have had a lot of traffic stops a lot of negligent operations, a lot of people that are not quite following all the boating rules and we are stepping in to enforce that, but besides that it hasn’t been too busy yet,” Kootenai County Marine Deputy Tanner Cox said.

According to Deputy Cox, a boater has to file a report if the damage is over $15,000 or have injuries beyond first aid.

“If there’s ever a boat crash,” Cox said,” We’re the ones that judge that, not the owners of the boat or the vessel so it’s easier just to us, have us respond to the accident and if we have to do a report we’ll do one if not then we don’t.”

Deputy Cox also stressed the importance of boating safety.

Now if for some reason you do wind up crashing, Cox says to always call 911.

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