'I didn't want him back': Teen talks about tense moments scaring - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

'I didn't want him back': Teen talks about tense moments scaring away wanted man

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SPOKANE COUNTY, Wash. -

17-year-old Kimber Wood stepped up to a situation that would have paralyzed others.

It's an unbelievable story that started as a pursuit with Spokane County Sheriff's deputies. They made a traffic stop in North Spokane County, but they driver they were stopping took off. Deputies spent hours looking for him, and we reported that on the Wake Up Show Monday morning. It turns out Wood's boyfriend was watching our newscast.

He called her to say there may be a bad guy in her neighborhood.

"You heart feels like it is going out of its chest," Wood said. "I couldn't breath well but I knew I had to."

They say your gut is your strongest muscle and that rang true for Wood Monday morning.

"I was laying in bed watching TV and my boyfriend called my parents. They warned me."

So she asked her dad for a gun, put it under her pillow and went back to sleep. Until she heard the screen door open.

"I heard it close and that just doesn't happen. I knew something was wrong," Wood said.

Her gut said grab the gun. So she did, and she waited.

"I heard footsteps and he went upstairs," she said.

She called her dad, who taught her everything she knows about guns, and he stayed with her on the phone as the footsteps got closer to her room. 

"I was laying right there on the bed and he came in, and that's when I crawled out, got the gun from my pillow..."

That's when the unthinkable happened.

"He popped in and I said, 'Who the [expletive] are you?'" Wood said. "His head was right there and I had the gun straight in his face and he ran."

Wood followed him out through the same screen door he came in and watched down the barrel of her gun.

"I knew I wanted to be as close to him as I could, and your hands are shaking, but you know you have to have steady aim."

Then she pulled the trigger. She didn't aim to hit him, she aimed to scare him away.

"I fired a shot at him because I didn't want him back," she said.

With no neighbors around, Wood waited for what felt like hours until her parents came back. And they brought the sheriff's department with them. The reality of what could have happened hung in the air like the gun smoke.

"When I found out a 17-year-old defended herself I thought that's fantastic," one deputy said. "I'm not her dad and I'm proud of her," one deputy said.

As for her own dad, proud is an understatement.

"That is something you teach the kids," Kimber's father said. "Lessons we went over and over, and you think they'll never have to use them, and today proved that they did, and it worked."

The wanted man stole one of their ATVs and deputies are still looking for him. They say they have a good idea who he is and, despite what happened Monday morning, they don't believe he is a danger to the public.

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