Mad Minute stories from Tuesday, July 25th - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Mad Minute stories from Tuesday, July 25th

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Mad Minute for 12/30/16 Mad Minute for 12/30/16

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) -- A 926-pound (420-kilogram) Mako shark caught off the New Jersey coast won't be recognized as a state record because more than one angler helped catch it.
The 12-foot-long (3.6-meter-long) shark caught Saturday about 100 miles (160 kilometers) offshore beats an 880-pound tiger shark caught in 1988. But six fishermen were involved in reeling in the Mako shark.
Regulations posted on the Division of Fish and Wildlife's website note state records "are determined by weight alone." But the agency notes the state record application says the angler seeking the certification must swear the fish was caught without anyone's help.
Mark Miccio was among the six who caught the shark. He tells The Philadelphia Inquirer they won't seek to have it recognized due to the single-angler rule. But he added Tuesday: "It's a record for us."

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A Wisconsin company is offering to microchip its employees, enabling them to open doors, log onto their computers and purchase break room snacks with a simple swipe of the hand.
Three Square Market, also known as 32M, said more than 50 employees are voluntarily getting implants Aug. 1 at what the company is calling a "chip party" at its River Falls headquarters. The chips are the size of a grain of rice and are inserted underneath the skin between the thumb and forefinger using a syringe. The procedure takes a couple of seconds.
The technology is already available in Europe but company leaders say this is its first appearance in the U.S. They hope the $300 microchips can eventually be used on more than just snack machines - everything from air travel, public transit and storing medical information.
"We want to be on the forefront of this. This is something's that's coming," said Curt Giles, president at 32M, which operates 2,000 self-checkout kiosks for companies in 20 countries. The company is partnering with Sweden's BioHax International, where employees have been using the implants. Three Square Market is paying for the employees' microchips.
While the technology has raised privacy concerns because of the potential to track a person's whereabouts and purchases, officials at 32M said the data in the microchip is encrypted and does not use GPS. But a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee said he worries about the potential for "function creep," where the stated purpose of a technology ends up spilling over into other uses, including surveillance.
"This is one of those technologies that sound like it might create some kind of efficiency, but to me the downside is just too great," said Michael Zimmer, who teaches internet ethics and privacy at the college's School of Information Studies.
Zimmer said what 32M is trying to achieve can be done through less invasive means, like with an iPhone app.
"Part of my general concern is that we don't go too fast and that we understand the implications of these sorts of (technologies), which is why it's good we're having this conversation," he said.
Giles and other company executives say they're having microchips implanted themselves next week but understand employees who don't want to do it. About 85 people work at 32M.
"We have employees who have said, 'I just don't want to do it.' And we 100 percent respect that," said Tony Danna, vice president of international development. Danna said the microchips can be easily removed in seconds, "just as if you were taking a sliver out of your finger."
The company is using the microchips in-house for now but other organizations have expressed interest in recent days, including a hospital chain, said Patrick McMullan, chief operating officer. He said he could not reveal the names of those who have expressed interest.
"We need to be responsible with this. This is not something you can do fast," McMullan said. "It has to be done right. You have to proceed slowly."
 
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LEBANON, N.H. (AP) -- Fifty-two years after losing his high school ring shortly after graduation, a man has gotten it back - and it was all of 3 miles away from where he grew up in New Hampshire.
Ray Goodwin, of White River Junction, Vermont, graduated from Lebanon High School in 1965. The Valley News reports he lost his ring before being drafted into the Air Force that year.
The retired 70-year-old cook got a call recently from Ann Kerrigan, in Wilder, Vermont, just across the state line. She found the ring, which was initialed, in her backyard. A call to the high school resulted in a search through yearbooks and other resources before Goodwin was reached.
Kerrigan herself was reunited with a Class of 1981 ring she had lost five years ago from Chestnut Hill College in Philadelphia.

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PHILADELPHIA (AP) -- The Philadelphia area's transit agency is dealing with a spider problem at one station in the city.
KYW-TV reports the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transit Authority has hired an exterminator to battle the bugs that keep dropping down onto waiting passengers at its station in Northern Liberties.
A SEPTA spokesman says that agency has also been cleaning light fixtures where a lot of the spiders have been hiding.
The station says it's noticing cleaning fixtures and fewer dead spiders at the station, but says a fair number of live spiders are still emerging at night to bug passengers like Adrian Hattaway.
Hattaway says the spiders are "really bad" and that if you're "sitting here not paying attention, they'll be in your face before you know it."

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WINCHESTER, Mass. (AP) -- A Massachusetts mother has a new outlook on life after receiving a kidney donation from a complete stranger.
WBZ-TV reports Nicole Baltzer never thought about being a living donor. Then she read a Facebook post about a single mother with lupus who needed a new kidney.
Baltzer says she remembers reading about Kara Yimoyines and thinking "this is so unfair." She decided to see if she was a match for the fellow Winchester mother.
Several months of screening later, doctors announced they had found a perfect match.
Yimoyines says the donation has helped her be involved in her children's lives in a way she hadn't been before.
The two women are now friends after finding they shared more than their kidneys in common.

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PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) -- An attorney for a man who pleaded guilty to a conspiracy charge in the takeover of an Oregon wildlife refuge says his client tested positive for morphine because he ate an 'everything' bagel with poppy seeds.
The Oregonian/Oregon Lives reported Monday that a federal judge in Portland, Oregon has ordered Jason Blomgren to avoid poppy seeds in addition to drugs.
Blomgren took a plea deal for his role in the armed occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge last year and is expected to be sentenced to probation next month.
He had been subpoenaed by the government to testify in a trial against Ammon Bundy and other leaders of the refuge occupation, but was not called as a witness.
Blomgren now says he will eat egg whites for breakfast.

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COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) -- A butter sculpture at this year's Ohio State Fair includes the traditional cow and calf along with four student-athletes and a 6-foot-tall (1.8-meter-tall) bottle colored to look like chocolate milk.
The American Dairy Association Mideast says the sculpture unveiled Tuesday salutes chocolate milk as the official drink of the Ohio High School Athletic Association.
It's the first time the butter sculpture has included color. Cocoa was added for the bottle.
The bottle stands among four athletes representing football, tennis, softball and soccer.
The dairy association says five sculptors spent about 500 hours creating the display, which is made from about 2,000 pounds (900 kilograms) of butter.
The fair opens Wednesday in Columbus.

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VINCENNES, Ind. (AP) -- Eight siblings who grew up in southwestern Indiana have amassed nearly 450 years of combined marriage.
Bruce Clinkenbeard of Freelandville, Indiana, and his wife Sally have been married for 53 years, but that's just the tip of the Clinkenbeard family's matrimonial iceberg.
Bruce and his seven siblings have together racked up a combined 448 years of marriage, and counting. Seven of the eight siblings either have been or were married for more than a half-century. That includes a sister who died in 2013 after 63 years of matrimony.
Bill Clinkenbeard has been married 59 years, but he and his wife Karen have always worked out any differences they've had. He tells the Vincennes Sun-Commercial their marriage is "a lot of give and take - and a lot of love."

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MIAMI (AP) - Celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay cooked up a unique dish while filming in Florida: Burmese python.
Ramsay joined Kyle Penniston of Miami on July 15 to hunt invasive pythons in the Everglades for an upcoming episode of his competitive-cooking television variety show "The F Word with Gordon Ramsay."
Penniston hunts pythons for the South Florida Water Management District , the state agency that oversees Everglades restoration. Researchers say pythons are decimating populations of native mammals that live in the vast wetlands.
According to a statement Tuesday from the district, Ramsay and his son, Jack, helped Penniston kill three pythons in western Miami-Dade County.
The district says Ramsay cooked one python alongside a levee in a portable oven. Penniston said it was an honor to have his first taste of python cooked by Ramsay.

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(FOX) Two brothers, ages 5 and 2, are safe after taking a joyride in their mother's car in West Virginia, before crashing into an embankment.
On Monday in Putnam County, the 5 year old drove the car for nearly 3 miles, with his 2-year-old brother along for the ride.
KSTU reported that the boys had been watching their mom drive, and they knew she kept keys under the floor mat of the 2005 Ford Focus.
The brothers wanted to visit the animals on their grandfather's farm about 7 miles away.
There were no other cars on the road, officials said. They made it 3 miles from home, and apparently knew exactly where their grandfather's house was. KSTU reported that the older boy was able to stretch down to reach the brake and gas pedals, while his 2-year-old brother helped steer
They were halfway there when they eventually ran off the road and into an embankment, Putnam County Sheriff Steve Deweese said.
The brothers crashed in a residential area, where residents called police. Both were taken to a hospital as a precaution. 
Officials are still trying to figure out how it happened.
Deweese said deputies didn't find the boys' mom until nearly an hour later, and she thought they were in the front yard playing.
No charges have been filed against the mother, but WSAZ reported that the landlord told the mother she is kicking the family out.
Deweese said police are working with Child Protective Services.
The Ford Focus had damage to its paneling and the front right wheel.
 

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