Mad Minute stories from Friday, August 11th - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Mad Minute stories from Friday, August 11th

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TRENTON, N.J. (AP) -- A sculpture showing a hand making the OK sign in New Jersey is being relocated because some people fear it too closely resembles a gang symbol.
The sculpture is titled "Helping Hands." Children ages 12 to 15 created it at a summer camp. The nonprofit organization Isles Inc. says the kids decided on the OK sign because they felt the peace sign was overused.
Isles selected the Trenton intersection where the sculpture was installed Tuesday and says it had gotten positive feedback from residents.
But Mayor Eric Jackson says his office received complaints the sculpture looks like a gang symbol. Jackson says he spoke with the Isles CEO and they agreed to move it off city property.
An Isles spokeswoman says the kids are disappointed with the decision.

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SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif. (AP) - A man who started choking in a coffeehouse was saved by a California State University, Sacramento student who was waiting to interview for a paramedic internship.
Coastal Peaks Coffee owner Mike Knight tells The Tribune newspaper he was leaving his office Wednesday to go into the San Luis Obispo establishment's cafe area when he heard someone choking and saw a young man quickly come to the man's aid.
The student, Will Stewart, was waiting with other candidates for internships with San Luis Ambulance.
He tells the newspaper he saw the man choking and performed the Heimlich maneuver.
Fred Motlo, a San Luis Ambulance field supervisor, says Stewart didn't mention the incident during the internship interview and they did not find out about it until later.
Stewart got the internship.
 
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SCOTT, La. (AP) - Authorities say a Louisiana high school senior in trouble because of his hair color ended up punching a school safety officer.
News outlets report the 17-year-old Acadiana High School student is accused of attacking the officer Wednesday after being sent to the office because of bright red hair.
Lafayette Parish schools banned hair colors not natural to humans, such as blue or pink, beginning this year.
Scott Police Chief Chad Leger says the student was told to eat lunch while awaiting a parent to retrieve him, and was later found in an unauthorized area of the public high school. Authorities say he punched the officer twice in the head while being escorted to the office.
He's accused of resisting an officer with violence.
It's unclear if he has a lawyer.

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NEW YORK (AP) -- You won't find any pictures of dogs playing poker at DoGUMENTA.
A three-day art exhibition curated expressly for dogs is attracting hundreds of canines to a marina in lower Manhattan, where hounds and terriers are feasting their eyes, and in some cases their mouths, on nearly a dozen masterpieces created expressly for them.
The idea is the brainchild of former Washington Post art critic Jessica Dawson, who says she was inspired by her rescue dog Rocky, a tiny morkie (Yorkie-Maltese mix), who regularly joins her at exhibits of the human variety.
"When Rocky accompanied me on my gallery visits I noticed that he was having a much better time than I was," explains Dawson, who moved to New York four years ago. "He was not reading the New York Times reviews, he was not reading the artists' resumes, and so I said he has something to teach me about looking, and all dogs have something to teach us about looking at contemporary art and being with it."
Organizers of the exhibit, which takes its name from Documenta, which takes place every five years in Kassel, Germany, and put on by Arts at Brookfield, staggered the arrival times of the dogs to keep things orderly.
"I think she's enjoying it," said Lorraine Gates, who attended with her tiny Japanese chin, Maltese and Papillon mix. "I love this idea; I think it's really wonderful."
The 10 works of art at the outdoor exhibit were all strategically placed at eye-level for the canines. One featured an elaborate display of dog biscuits and other treats that attendees were invited to munch on.
At another exhibit, four-legged art critics were lifting their hind legs and "expressing" themselves on a work called "Fountain." As the dogs left their marks, scribbles of blue streaks were left behind on the white blocks.
Dawson said Rocky had visited several times.
Susan Godwin and her morkie, Tasha, were soaking up the art vibes. "This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity," Godwin gushed. "You can go to museums all over New York and you can never bring your dog."

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LONDON (AP) - The Bank of England has rejected calls to scrap new banknotes that contain traces of animal fat.
The bank says it will continue to issue polymer notes that contain tallow, a rendered form of animal fat.
Some vegans and Hindus had called on the bank to remove tallow from the 5-pound note introduced last year - Britain's first polymer banknote.
After a public consultation, the bank said Thursday that it would continue to make 5-pound notes, a 10-pound note due to be issued later this year and a future 20-pound note from polymer manufactured using "trace amounts" of chemicals derived from animal products.
It says the only viable alternative is palm oil, which has its own issues about cost and environmental sustainability.

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Sparks flew Tuesday night at a Nevada city council meeting, but it had nothing to do with what was being discussed.
In the midst of the Boulder City council meeting, a woman's purse erupted into flames and smoke billowed as it was perched on her lap, startling attendees, some of whom screamed and jumped.
The purse was tossed on the ground, singeing the carpet and leaving burn marks on the sidewalk outside, FOX 5 Las Vegas reported.
"I just knew something was wrong. I saw the smoke and said: 'That's not right,'" Boulder City Fire Chief Kevin Nicholson told FOX 5. "It was an exciting and unique evening."
Nicholson said the woman only suffered minor burns on her leg, and did not have to go to the hospital. After the purse was extinguished, the meeting was able to continue.
As to the cause of the incident, Nicholson said the woman's cell phone was fine, but a battery in her purse somehow malfunctioned and burst into flames.
The fire chief recommended that people should make sure they are following manufacturer's recommendations in storing batteries for devices.
"You do need to be careful what you do put in your purse, and I know a lot of people like to bring a lot of things with them," Nicholson said.

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WESTERLY, R.I. (AP) -- Rhode Island beachgoers are puzzled and concerned about a mysterious object lodged about 10 feet underwater just off Westerly's East Beach.
The circular object has stainless steel legs and is capped with concrete. It appears to be either very heavy or rooted in place.
The Westerly Sun reported Friday the object was first seen last summer but could not be found on follow-up attempts.
East Beach Association President Peter Brockmann says he's been asking experts about the object's origin. He says the best tip he received was from University of Rhode Island oceanographers, who said it could be a stand for a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers device used to monitor currents and sediment flow during dredging projects.
Brockmann says they will try to uproot the object next week.

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ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) -- Federal researchers studying critically endangered North Pacific right whales sometimes go years without finding their subjects. Over the weekend they got lucky.
A research vessel in the Bering Sea photographed two of the animals Sunday and obtained a biopsy sample from one, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Thursday.
NOAA Fisheries research biologist Jessica Crance was on board the Yushin Maru 2, when the whales were spotted. The ship is part of the Pacific Ocean Whale and Ecosystem Research program, a collaborative effort headed by the International Whaling Commission. Using an acoustic recorder, and between sounds of killer whales and walrus, Crance picked up faint calls of a right whale east of Bristol Bay, Alaska.
The sounds came from an estimated 10 to 32 miles (16 to 51 kilometers) away and the ship headed west, she said in a blog entry. After four and a half hours, despite the presence of minke and humpback whales, and only a few calls from the right whales, the rare animals were spotted.
The two right whales are part of the eastern stock that number just 30 to 50 whales, said Phillip Clapham, head of the cetacean program at NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle.
A French whaling ship recorded the first kill in 1835 and reported seeing "millions" of others. That claim was exaggerated but it drew hundreds of other whalers to the Gulf of Alaska and the Bering Sea, Clapham said.
Within 14 years, Clapham said, the overharvest of the slow, buoyant animals sent many whalers through the Bering Strait to hunt bowhead whales instead.
A modest comeback of right whales in the 20th Century was derailed when Soviet whalers in the 1960s ignored critically low numbers and illegally killed eastern stock right whales in the Gulf of Alaska, Clapham said.
The right whale sampled Sunday had been seen eight times before, Clapham said. The last time was a decade ago.
A biopsy sample, he said, can positively identify the animal, reveal its gender, indicate whether it's pregnant and reveal information on diet and reproductive hormones.
Studying North Pacific right whales is complicated by the expense of reaching their habitat in the Gulf of Alaska and the Bering Sea. Critical data remains unknown, including their winter habits and many of their preferred summer feeding areas for copepods, a tiny crustacean plankton.
"We don't know what habitats continue to be important to the species," Clapham said.
The biggest threats to the animals are fishing gear entanglements and ship strikes, Clapham said.

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A man who allegedly robbed a Texas Walgreens was arrested Wednesday night after he was identified due to his unique face tattoo.
Christopher Breaker 25, was arrested for using a knife to rob a Walgreens in Harris County on Aug. 4, according to ABC 13. Witnesses reported the tattooed man "acting differently" as he paced around the business.
An employee said Breaker took food off the shelves and ate it before he leapt over the pharmacy's counter and pulled a knife out of his pocket.
The man then tried to break open a door with a fire extinguisher but gave up and exited through the front entrance.   
Christopher Breaker was identified for the crime after witnesses described his distinct face tattoo.  (Eureka Police Department)
Witnesses were able to describe the man due to his noticeable face tattoo that resembles a clown. 
Breaker was also wanted in California for auto theft. The day after the robbery, he was reported missing, authorities said.
The suspect has been held without bond on a "second-degree felony count of aggravated robbery with a deadly weapon," according to ABC13.

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COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) -- The owner of an amateur-built submarine was arrested on suspicion of murder Friday after his vessel sank off Denmark's coast and a journalist who had joined him for what was supposed to be a short voyage was reported missing, Copenhagen police said.
Police said in a statement Friday night that the man denied killing the missing woman and reported dropped her off on a redeveloped island in Copenhagen's harbor about 3 ½ hours into their Thursday night trip.
The statement did not identify the submarine's owner, Peter Madsen, 46, but the Danish inventor's financing of the project through crowdfunding and first launch of the UC3 Nautilus in 2008 made headlines.
The 40-ton, nearly 18-meter-long (60-foot-long) has been described as the largest privately built submarine of its kind.
Before his arrest, Madsen appeared on Danish television to discuss the submarine's sinking and his rescue. It was the journalist's boyfriend who alerted authorities early Friday that the sub had not returned from a test run, police said.
"I am fine, but sad because Nautilus went down," Madsen told Denmark's TV2 channel, which aired footage of him getting off what appeared to be a private boat and making a thumbs-up sign.
Madsen said "a minor problem with a ballast tank" - a compartment that holds water to provide stability - "turned into a major issue" that ultimately caused the vessel to sink.
"It took about 30 seconds for Nautilus to sink, and I couldn't close any hatches or anything," he said. "But I guess that was pretty good, because I otherwise still would have been down there."
Swedish police said later in the day they were investigating the whereabouts of a missing woman who had been on the submarine at some point.
"Whether the woman was on board the submarine at the time of her disappearance is unclear," police said in a statement.
The woman was a journalist writing about Madsen and his submarine, Swedish and Danish media reported.
"He told us that the journalist who also had been on board had been dropped off Thursday evening," Danish navy spokesman Anders Damgaard told The Associated Press. "They were the only two on board yesterday."
Copenhagen Deputy Police Inspector Jens Moller Jensen says investigators are looking for witnesses who may have seen the woman after the time Madsen reported she disembarked. She also was not identified by name.
The police statement said the submerged submarine was lying in seven feet of water, but divers had not been able to enter it safely as of Friday night. They were hoping to tow it to port on Saturday and open it then, the statement said.
Madsen describes himself as an "inventrepaneur" on the website for his Copenhagen-based company. RML Spacelab is seeking to send people into space and is developing a rocket, floating launch pad and astronaut testing machine among other projects, the site says.
"My passion is finding ways to travel to worlds beyond the well-known," Madsen wrote on the site. "I design and manufacture non-commercial extreme machines, employing teams of volunteering engineers and technicians to challenge the ordinary...."
"The undersea world is close, it's beautiful, always just around the corner in Denmark. Diving, no matter the method, is very challenging and it*s technically difficult to go to beyond where rubber suits and scuba gear can take us."
The Nautilus set out from Refshale Island, a former shipyard redeveloped as an purposed as an entertainment and activity spot, at about 7 p.m. local time on Thursday, according to a police timeline.
Two helicopters and three ships combed the sea from Copenhagen to the Baltic Sea island of Bornholm after police learned just after 3:30 a.m. It was spotted by a lighthouse in Koge Bay, a seaport south of the city, at 10:30 a.m.
"A radio contact was established for the boat, which, according to the owner, was heading towards the harbor," the police statement said. Half an hour later "the submarine suddenly sank and the owner was subsequently rescued on a private motorboat sailing him in port."
Madsen "told us he had technical problems" when asked to explain why the submarine failed to respond to radio contact earlier in the day, Damgaard said.

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