Mad Minute stories from Friday, August 18th - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Mad Minute stories from Friday, August 18th

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ST. AUGUSTINE, Fla. (AP) -- It wasn't exactly the catch a Florida man was hoping for while fishing in the Atlantic Ocean. Instead, deputies say a drunken 22-year-old woman cursed at him before swimming up to his fishing line, biting it and swimming away with the rigging.
St. Johns County Sheriff's officials tell local news outlets the fisherman told deputies the incident happened Tuesday evening as he was fishing with a rented pole near St. Augustine.
Deputies asked Alexandria Turner to come to the pier office, but she became belligerent. Investigators say Turner created a scene and upset the "sense of public norm at the pier" when they tried to take her into custody.
She was arrested on suspicion of intoxication and resisting arrest.
A lawyer wasn't listed in court records.

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LOWER TOWNSHIP, N.J. (AP) -- A driver was forced to gun his engine and jump a drawbridge that began rising as he crossed it with his family.
Terence Naphys, of West Deptford Township, had paid the toll to cross the Middle Thorofare Bridge with three family members in his vehicle on Aug. 1. The bridge links Cape May with the Wildwoods near the Jersey shore.
As he was crossing the steel grate, it began to rise 3 to 6 feet (0.9 to 1.8 meters) because a vessel was trying to cross, police said.
"My wife said, 'I think the bridge is opening,'" Terence Naphys told KYW-TV in Philadelphia.
"He accelerated, and of course then we landed with a big impact on the concrete on the side," said Jackie Naphys.
Police said the landing caused minor damage to his vehicle. No one was hurt.
Authorities said the operator of the bridge was to blame for the scare.
"An employee for the Cape May County Bridge Commission stated that a large vessel was approaching the bridge and they had no contact with that vessel due to their radio being down," police said in their report.
The bridge tender told police he activated the bridge's lights and gates in anticipation that all vehicles would be clear. However, he wasn't sure because of sun glare.
Terence Naphys said he would never cross the bridge again.
 
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MCMINNVILLE, Ore. (AP) -- An Oregon family's golden retriever has been honored by a sheriff for digging up $85,000 worth of black tar heroin in a family's backyard.
KATU-TV reported Friday that the owners of the 18-month-old dog named Kenyon thought he had dug up a time capsule in their backyard, so they decided to film themselves opening it.
As they did, they realized Kenyon had found drugs.
Yamhill County Sheriff Tim Svenson identified the substance as more than 15 ounces of black tar heroin.
Svenson presented Kenyon with an official ribbon and named him an honorary narcotics dog for life.

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(Huffington Post) - He's one silver fox.
A 76-year-old former construction worker in Brazil now has a new title to go beside grandpa: He's Sao Paulo's handsomest elderly man.
Jose dos Santos Neves beat out 24 other hunks to win the coveted title in Sao Paulo's Handsomest Elderly Man 2017, a pageant for senior citizens held on Thursday.
Naturally, he was proud.
"Participating and winning this little trophy means a lot to me mainly because when you're as old as I am, it's an achievement," he told AFP.
The pageant is held by the Sao Paulo state health department to promote self-esteem among older people, according to Nilton da Silva Guedes. He's the health director at Sao Paulo Centre for Elderly Care, which hosted the pageant.
"We've been doing this competition for 14 years, and one of its purposes is to promote self-esteem among the elderly, healthy aging, to draw the elderly from inside the house where they're doing nothing, to come here and do some exercise, dance, even participate in a beauty pageant, to show a different side to beauty," DaSilva told AFP.
Santos competed against other men between ages 62 and 96.
He hopes his win inspires other older guys to make the most of life.
"The elderly have to carry on, appreciate themselves, improve their health, do a lot of exercise, look after their health, so they can enjoy the good days at our age, because the abyss isn't very far away now," he said.

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ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) - There's a new twist in the standoff between an octogenarian widow in Florida who refused to sell her townhome and the giant developer that constructed a timeshare resort around her vacant, two-story building anyway.
In order to get a county permit for tenants to move into the new timeshare units, the company needs her signature - and she's not giving it. That prompted the parent company of Westgate Resorts to sue Orange County, Florida, this month, demanding that the county issue the occupancy permit anyway.
The timeshare giant's lawsuit is the latest development in the ongoing fight between Julieta Corredor and Westgate Resorts. Corredor was the last owner in her condominium development who refused to sell to Westgate so it could build the new timeshare complex in the heart of Orlando's tourist district. The company tweaked its plans, but moved forward, building a seven-story, multimillion-dollar edifice within feet of the Corredor townhome.
The 82-year-old woman's townhome was damaged when a contractor for the timeshare company was clearing the site for the construction of Westgate's timeshare complex. No one now lives in the property, which was used as a vacation home by the South Florida-based Corredor family. The home, which Westgate said the family has not used in more than a decade, has now been deemed uninhabitable because of the damage.
Orange County officials have told Westgate their contractor needs a demolition permit for the unpermitted work done on Corredor's building before it will grant the occupancy permit for one building and a building permit for the second building in the timeshare complex. That requires the signature of Corredor, who has so far steadfastly refused all of the company's offers to buy out her unit.
"The fact that Westgate apparently undertook demolition without proper permitting from Orange County, substantially damaging Mrs. Corredor's condominium in the process and rendering it uninhabitable, is one of the big reasons that we're in this mess," said Corredor's attorney, Brent Siegel.
County spokeswoman Doreen Overstreet said the county wouldn't comment due to the pending litigation. Corredor and her sons weren't named as defendants in the lawsuit, although their fight with Westgate looms large over the complaint.
In emails filed with the court, a lawyer for Westgate complained that the county's decision not to issue the occupancy permit is costing Westgate "tens of thousands of dollars every day." The lawsuit said the company has passed all final inspections and that the county has "a clear legal ministerial duty" to issue the occupancy permit.
The county also told Westgate it needs to make repairs to the Corredor home in order to get the permit, and that also requires Corredor's signature. That's something she is willing to sign off on, provided she gets all the details on the proposed repairs, her attorney said.
Officials at the timeshare company said they've offered to rebuild the Corredors' unit at the same or a new location and provide $50,000 in furnishings. They've presented an offer of a $150,000 cash buy-out, and they've said they're willing to offer a comparable, newly-renovated unit in a different building. The Corredors have repeatedly said "no."
The Corredors have said that their case is a matter of principle on property rights and that they feel bullied by Westgate.
The Corredors have two lawsuits pending against Westgate. There have been no steps toward settlement talks since the beginning of the year, Siegel said.

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(Huffington Post) - China has banned companies from registering weird and long names.
Last year, Beijing banned any more "bizarre" buildings. In recent years the country has seen buildings shaped like a teapot and another resembling a pair of trousers.
Now, China's State Administration for Industry and Commerce has continued the government's crusade for normalcy with restrictions on such names as 'scared of wife' or 'prehistoric powers'.
So, just how weird and wonderful are Chinese company names? Well, a few otherwise-unoccupied social media users in China have dug up some gems.
Some curiosities have crept into business names from internet memes.
"Shenyang Prehistoric Powers Hotel Management Limited Company" might sound weird but less so to Chinese sports fans who remember swimmer Fu Yuanhui.
She famously won a bronze medal at the Rio Olympics, afterwards declaring: "I have used all my prehistoric powers to swim!"
There are also lots of restaurants and cafes with the phrase "skinny blue mushroom".
The phrase originated from a meme which mocked a man from Guangxi province who uploaded a video of himself talking about his loneliness while his girlfriend was away.
"Unbearable, I want to cry," he moaned - but thanks to his accent, it ended up sounding more like "skinny blue mushroom".
Scared of wife
One of the best known offbeat names on Chinese social media is a condom company called "Uncle Niu".
Or, more accurately, "There Is a Group of Young People With Dreams, Who Believe They Can Make the Wonders of Life Under the Leadership of Uncle Niu Internet Technology Co Ltd."
It's not concise, but at least it's positive.
Others aren't so upbeat, especially when it comes to home life.
And given "Beijing Scared of Wife Technology Company" and "Anping County Scared of Wife Netting Products Factory" are both registered companies, the trend doesn't seem to be limited by industry or region.
The rules of written Chinese are vastly different to those of written English, so many names seem far stranger in translation than in the original tongue.
English names can seem pretty strange in Chinese too, and there's a cottage industry among branding agencies to help western companies come up with names for the Chinese market.
Western company names often follow the name of their founder (think Boeing, Ford or Gucci), which might have no direct translation.
Or they might be a concocted portmanteau (think Verizon, which is the Latin word "veritas" meaning truth, with horizon bolted on to the end) or maybe even just tech nonsense (Etsy, Hulu).
"What we think is most important to come up with a name that captures the spirit of the brand," says Tait Lawton, from Nanjing Marketing Group, which provides naming services.
Western companies sometimes try to phonetically replicate the original, or come up with a Chinese name that's fairly neutral in meaning.
Others will come up with a new name that tries other ways of encapsulating the brand.
"BMW's current Chinese name is ??. It's great. The first character means 'treasure' and the second character means 'horse'. The sound is 'bao ma', starting with a B and M. Plus, it's short. It just has a great feel to it," says Mr Lawton.
He has a few other examples he likes too.
Pampers, for example, is ??? or "bang bao shi", which means "helps make baby comfortable".
Walch soap ??? or "wei lu shi" loosely translates as "mighty liquid guard", and who wouldn't want to wash with that?

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Bowling Green, OH - An Ohio college football player kicked his way onto a full ride scholarship.
Bowling Green State University sophomore Jake Suder was set to play this upcoming football season without a scholarship.
But head coach Mike Jinks said he could earn one if he made a 53-yard field goal.
With his teammates and coaches looking on, Suder lined up and drilled it through the uprights -- earning a full ride scholarship for the rest of his time at Bowling Green.
His teammates went crazy, lifting him into the air in celebration.
In 2016, Suder was the team's primary kicker -- making 9-of-12 field goal attempts and 35-of-38 extra points.

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(Huffington Post) - This brings new meaning to the term "drain your lizard."
A man in Fountain Valley, California, is suing after saying he found two baby geckos in a 24-ounce can of Heineken beer, according the Los Angeles Times reports.
He's suing for undisclosed amount, according to a lawsuit filed Friday in Orange County Superior Court.
George Toubbeh claims he bought the supposedly tainted beer can back in August, 2015, from a Ralphs grocery store.
He noticed the beer had a foul taste, and experienced severe abdominal pains and vomiting shortly after drinking it, according to the suit.
Toubbeh's daughter then examined the contents of the beer can and found two geckos. Specifically, they were juvenile leopard geckos, a species not indigenous to the United States.
The lawsuit claims the animals were not decomposed and speculates they somehow were alive when the beer was originally canned.
Toubbeh said he went to the emergency room after becoming "violently ill," and was given Xanax and Zofran for his nausea and vomiting. He went to an Urgent Care clinic two days later complaining "severe stomach pains and cramps, loss of sensation, hyperactive bowel movements, and nearly complete loss of appetite."
The suit claims Toubbeh has suffered "extreme anxiety" and post-traumatic stress disorder ever since he found the dead lizards in his beer, which caused him to missed weeks of work.
He is suing Heineken, the Cincinnati-based The Kroger Company ? which owns the Ralphs grocery store chain ? and an unknown beer distributor.
The Kroger Company, which did not immediately respond to a request for comment from HuffPost.
Heineken has released a statement denying Toubbeh's accusations:
"Heineken USA holds the safety and integrity of the products we import to the highest standards," spokeswoman Tara Rush says in a statement to the Register. "We have investigated this isolated claim, and based on a number of factors, we confidently believe there is no merit to this claim."
Toubbeh's attorney, John Montevideo, told the Orange County Register his client brought the can he said contained the geckos to the law office shortly after the incident.
The suit was only filed after a zoologist and a lab examined the lager-soaked lizards to determine their breed and level of decomposition.
"We truly believe that he is credible, and we have done the independent investigation to verify what they were and their condition," he told the paper. "We feel confident that this is a viable and a real issue."

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TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) - An adult Asian carp found in a Chicago waterway near Lake Michigan this summer began its life far downstream and apparently got around a series of electric barriers intended to keep the invasive species out of the Great Lakes, officials said Friday.
Autopsy results and a scientific analysis showed the silver carp, which was caught June 22, was a 4-year-old male that originated in the Illinois/Middle Mississippi watershed, according to the Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee, a coalition of government agencies.
It could have hatched anywhere along a roughly 200-mile (320-kilometer) stretch of the Illinois River before migrating northwest, said Charlie Wooley, the Midwest deputy regional director for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It spent time in the Des Plaines River before finding its way to the Little Calumet River just 9 miles (14 kilometers) from the lake, where a fisherman landed it.
The only way the carp could have gotten there was to evade three barriers in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal some 37 miles (60 kilometers) from Lake Michigan, Wooley said. But it's unclear how that happened.
The barriers emit powerful electric pulses designed to repel carp that get too close or knock them out and possibly kill them if they don't turn back.
An earlier study raised the possibility that small fish could be pulled through the electric field in the wake of passing barges and survive.
Yet scientists who conducted a chemical analysis of the carp's inner ear bones to determine which waters it had been in concluded the fish had spent no more than a few weeks to a few months in the stretch of river where it was found. It was fully grown, measuring 28 inches (71 centimeters) long and weighing 8 pounds (3 kilograms).
"We're pretty darn confident a fish of this size would be incapacitated going through" the barriers, Wooley said, adding, "We're baffled and we just don't know how it got there."
Aside from the carp swimming through, another possibility is someone moved it past the barriers - intentionally or otherwise, said Kevin Irons, aquatic nuisance species program manager for the Illinois Department of Natural Resources. The fish might have jumped onto a boat and been carried past the barriers, then thrown out by an occupant who didn't realize what type it was, he said.
The analysis was conducted by experts with Southern Illinois University, the Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Geological Survey.
The fish was only the second live Asian carp ever caught past the barriers; the other was in 2010. The find gave fresh ammunition to critics who question the effectiveness of the government's strategy for protecting the lakes. A search of the area where it was captured turned up no others.
"It confirms what we've known all along - those electric barriers are not foolproof and additional protections are needed," said Molly Flanagan of the Alliance for the Great Lakes, a Chicago-based environmental group.
Scientists warn that bighead and silver carp, both imported from Asia decades ago, could out-compete native species for food if they become established in the Great Lakes, where commercial and sport fishing are worth billions of dollars annually.
Environmental groups and officials in some of the region's states, including Michigan, have called for separating the Great Lakes and Mississippi River watersheds by installing dams or other physical barriers in the Chicago waterways.
Officials and industry leaders in Illinois and Indiana oppose that, saying it would disrupt freight shipping on the busy waterway.
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers this month released a report calling for $275 million in technological and structural upgrades at the Brandon Road Lock and Dam near Joliet, Illinois, part of the aquatic chain that connects Lake Michigan to the Asian carp-infested Mississippi River watershed.
Sen. Debbie Stabenow, a Michigan Democrat, said the examination of the silver carp proved it had gone past Brandon Road during its upstream journey.
"Time is of the essence to both implement a permanent solution and take immediate steps to stop Asian carp from reaching our Great Lakes," Stabenow said.
Wooley said the discovery of the single carp past the barriers doesn't mean they are ineffective.
"It just shows we've got to be constantly on our toes, sampling the system and learning about the system to make sure the fish don't get ahead of us," he said.

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WORCESTER, MA (NBC NEWS) - Cops at a donut shop? Not exactly breaking news. But this coffee break caught our eye.
Two Worcester Massachusetts police officers stopped off at Dunkin Donuts for a quick snack.
On horseback!
In the photo, you see the worker handing the officer a drink through the drive thru window.
The other officer snapped the picture from between the horse's ears.
The Worcester Police Department tweet said, "Drive thru old western style .. John Wayne would be proud!"

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