5 years since Sandy Hook School Shooting... Remembering the 26 v - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

5 years since Sandy Hook School Shooting... Remembering the 26 victims

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Activism, charity sustain Sandy Hook families 5 years later

NEWTOWN, Conn. (AP) - Out of a senseless tragedy, many relatives of the 26 children and educators killed five years ago at Sandy Hook Elementary School have sought ways to find meaning in advocacy.
 
They've dedicated themselves to charity, activism and other efforts to channel their grief and, in many cases, to help prevent violence.
 
Some organizations honor the passions of the children who were lost on Dec. 14, 2012.
 
Others have jumped into the policy fray to lobby for gun control or improved mental health care. In some cases, they've traveled the country, and even the world, as recognized experts in their fields.
 
The Sandy Hook families have created a website to share each of their stories and information about the various projects they've started in memory of their family members.

(Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

5 years after Sandy Hook, mental health care worries linger

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) - Five years after the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School, mental health care providers are waiting for promised boosts in funding and many families are still battling with insurance companies to cover their children's services.
 
While advocates say the quality of mental health care varies widely by state, they also see reason for optimism in a push for more early intervention programs and changing public attitudes.
 
The shooting killed 20 first-graders and six educators on Dec. 14, 2012. It prompted calls for tighter controls on guns and improved mental health treatment.
 
The 21st Century Cures Act created a committee to advise Congress and federal agencies on the needs of adults and young people with serious mental illness. It's scheduled to meet Thursday to discuss the group's first report to Congress.

(Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

When just saying 'I'm from Newtown' can be a cross to bear

NEWTOWN, Conn. (AP) - Five years after the Sandy Hook massacre, residents of Newtown, Connecticut, are dealing with what it means to be from a place whose name has become synonymous with tragedy.
 
Some avoid telling strangers where they are from because they are not interested in getting into daily discussions about gun control or mental health care.
 
Others have found themselves dealing with awkward silences, or accepting condolences on behalf of an entire town.
 
Pat Llodra (LOH'-druh) led the town through the tragedy as the head of its governing board. She says she understands that most outsiders just wants to express how deeply they were affected by the shootings, and she gladly accepts what she calls their grace.
 
But she says the shooting doesn't define the town; she says it has always been a safe and good place to live.

(Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

Mass shootings aren't more frequent, but they are deadlier

ATLANTA (AP) - It can sometimes seem as though mass shootings are occurring more frequently. Researchers who have been studying such crimes for decades say they aren't, but they have been getting deadlier.
 
In the five years since a gunman killed 20 children and six adults at a Connecticut elementary school, the nation has seen a number of massacres topping the death toll from Newtown and previous mass shootings. Many of them involve the same AR-style rifle used in Sandy Hook.
 
But Americans wanting to know why mass shootings are happening will get few answers. There remains little research on the topic and mass shooters remain an enigma.
 
It's also unclear whether the higher death tolls are the result of more firearms being available or firearms being more effective.

(Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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