Records: FBI knew Las Vegas gunman had big gun stashes - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Records: FBI knew Las Vegas gunman had big gun stashes

Posted: Updated:
LAS VEGAS -

FBI agents knew the gunman behind the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history left behind big caches of guns, ammunition and explosives when they sought warrants to search his properties and online accounts, according to court documents released Friday.

However, new questions were raised after a U.S. judge in Nevada unsealed the documents revealing some of what federal agents had learned about shooter Stephen Paddock in the week after the Las Vegas attack.

The 315 pages of FBI affidavits provide just a glimpse of what investigators found during initial searches of Paddock’s car and home after police found him dead late Oct. 1 in a hotel room at the Mandalay Bay resort. Girlfriend Marilou Danley’s casino player rewards card was with him, although she was in the Philippines at the time.

The documents made public did not answer the key question: What motivated Paddock, a 64-year-old high-stakes gambler, to unleash gunfire from his room on the 32nd floor of the resort into an outdoor concert below. Paddock killed 58 people and injured hundreds more before killing himself.

Prosecutors didn’t oppose the request for the records by media organizations, including The Associated Press. The affidavits were filed to get search warrants.

The records also did not say whether Danley knew in advance about Paddock’s plans and why Paddock apparently emailed himself about buying and selling weapons and accessories.

Danley told investigators they would probably find her fingerprints on bullets because she sometimes helped Paddock load ammunition magazines.

An FBI agent told a judge in an Oct. 3 document that Danley wasn’t arrested when she returned to the U.S.; she had provided a DNA sample to authorities, and she was cooperating with investigators.

Police and the FBI have described Danley as a person of interest in the case. FBI spokeswoman Sandra Breault in Las Vegas said late Friday she could not comment about Danley or the investigation

Las Vegas police Officer Aden OcampoGomez and Breault said Friday that they had no update about Paddock’s motive. Both called it an ongoing investigation.

Another document said Paddock apparently sent messages between separate email accounts with similar names referring to buying and selling assault-style rifles and so-called “bump stock” devices to make the guns more rapid-fire.

The records provided don’t provide inventories of what was obtained from searches. Attorney Maggie McLetchie, representing AP and the Las Vegas Review-Journal, said she is still seeking those documents.

Investigators have said Paddock meticulously planned his attack and intentionally concealed his actions. He modified assault-style rifles to shoot rapidly, set up cameras to watch for police outside his hotel room and wounded a security guard in the hotel hallway.

Police and the FBI have said they found no evidence that Paddock had help carrying out the attack.

Paddock’s three-bedroom house in a retirement community in Mesquite was searched twice — first by police and FBI agents in the hours immediately after Paddock was identified as the shooter.

Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo later said that Oct. 2 search found 19 guns and several pounds of potentially explosive materials. A court document said more than 1,000 rounds of ammunition also was found.

The FBI returned to the house a week later for what officials at the time called “redocumenting and rechecking.” Their warrant gave agents authority to search for “trace evidence” including blood and hair fibers.

Officers initially searched the hotel suite where Paddock opened fire and his vehicle after it was found parked in the casino parking structure. Lombardo said several pounds of ammonium nitrate, a material used to make explosives, was found in the car.

A document released Friday said more than 1,000 rounds of ammunition and 100 pounds (45.4 kilograms) of explosive material was found in the vehicle.

Other searches were conducted at a house the gunman owned in Reno, where agents found a red SUV and a neighbor reported that Paddock kept a safe the size of a refrigerator in the garage. Agents said their initial search found “a large quantity of ammunition and multiple firearms” on the property.

FBI agents returned to that house on Oct. 10 after local police determined someone had broken in days earlier.

U.S. District Judge Jennifer Dorsey allowed the government to keep one affidavit sealed pending a hearing before a Nevada state court judge on Tuesday about whether Las Vegas police search warrant documents should also be made public.

___

Associated Press writers Regina Garcia Cano in Las Vegas and Michael Balsamo in Los Angeles contributed to this report.

(Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

  • Most Popular StoriesMost Popular StoriesMore>>

  • 6-year-old Pullman boy dies after bike crash

    6-year-old Pullman boy dies after bike crash

    Monday, July 16 2018 5:58 PM EDT2018-07-16 21:58:29 GMT
    Police find suspicious devicePolice find suspicious device

    PULLMAN, Wash. - Pullman Police say a 6-year-old boy has passed away due to injuries suffered in a bicycle crash on Sunday.  Family says Denny Curran died a 6:30 a.m. Monday. He was hospitalized following a crash near Short Street and Parr Drive the day before. Pullman Police confirmed the boy passed away in a Facebook post.

    >>

    PULLMAN, Wash. - Pullman Police say a 6-year-old boy has passed away due to injuries suffered in a bicycle crash on Sunday.  Family says Denny Curran died a 6:30 a.m. Monday. He was hospitalized following a crash near Short Street and Parr Drive the day before. Pullman Police confirmed the boy passed away in a Facebook post.

    >>
  • Man who was hitting woman dies after witnesses intervene

    Man who was hitting woman dies after witnesses intervene

    Monday, July 16 2018 6:58 PM EDT2018-07-16 22:58:35 GMT

    YAKIMA, Wash. (AP) - Police say a man who was assaulting a woman in Yakima is dead after he was struck with a baton or baseball bat as witnesses intervened.    Authorities say the fight happened late Sunday night outside the Connections Transitional Apartments. Officers arrived to find a 57-year-old man who lived at the complex sitting outside with a head injury. He died at a hospital.

    >>

    YAKIMA, Wash. (AP) - Police say a man who was assaulting a woman in Yakima is dead after he was struck with a baton or baseball bat as witnesses intervened.    Authorities say the fight happened late Sunday night outside the Connections Transitional Apartments. Officers arrived to find a 57-year-old man who lived at the complex sitting outside with a head injury. He died at a hospital.

    >>
  • Motorcyclist killed in crash on Sherman Pass

    Motorcyclist killed in crash on Sherman Pass

    Monday, July 16 2018 1:58 AM EDT2018-07-16 05:58:31 GMT

    SHERMAN PASS, Wash.- A 53-year-old man was killed Sunday after a crash involving a motorcycle and transit van. The crash happened on State Route 20, just before 6pm on Sunday, about 14 miles east of Republic.

    >>

    SHERMAN PASS, Wash.- A 53-year-old man was killed Sunday after a crash involving a motorcycle and transit van. The crash happened on State Route 20, just before 6pm on Sunday, about 14 miles east of Republic.

    >>
HD DOPPLER 6i
/
  • Top Stories from KHQHomeMore>>

  • Employees attack, subdue would-be robber armed with box cutter

    Employees attack, subdue would-be robber armed with box cutter

    Tuesday, July 17 2018 12:10 AM EDT2018-07-17 04:10:47 GMT

    TUCSON, Ariz. - A man armed with a box cutter got more than he bargained for when he tried to rob a Tucson, Arizona, restaurant last week.  Security shows the man, identified as 20-year-old Jerry Evans Madril, enter the Mi Nidito restaurant and demand money from employees. But the workers weren't having any of it.  At least six workers attacked Madril.

    >>

    TUCSON, Ariz. - A man armed with a box cutter got more than he bargained for when he tried to rob a Tucson, Arizona, restaurant last week.  Security shows the man, identified as 20-year-old Jerry Evans Madril, enter the Mi Nidito restaurant and demand money from employees. But the workers weren't having any of it.  At least six workers attacked Madril.

    >>
  • FCC head has 'serious concerns' with Sinclair-Tribune deal

    FCC head has 'serious concerns' with Sinclair-Tribune deal

    Monday, July 16 2018 10:54 PM EDT2018-07-17 02:54:02 GMT

    NEW YORK (AP) - The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission is raising "serious concerns" about Sinclair's $3.9 billion deal for Tribune's television stations.    Sinclair wants to buy Tribune Media and its 42 TV stations, including KTLA in Los Angeles and WPIX in New York. To address potential antitrust concerns, Sinclair has said it would sell stations to several buyers.

    >>

    NEW YORK (AP) - The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission is raising "serious concerns" about Sinclair's $3.9 billion deal for Tribune's television stations.    Sinclair wants to buy Tribune Media and its 42 TV stations, including KTLA in Los Angeles and WPIX in New York. To address potential antitrust concerns, Sinclair has said it would sell stations to several buyers.

    >>
  • Russian hackers used US online infrastructure against itself

    Russian hackers used US online infrastructure against itself

    Monday, July 16 2018 10:28 PM EDT2018-07-17 02:28:01 GMT

    WASHINGTON (AP) - Exactly seven months before the 2016 presidential election, Russian government hackers made it onto a Democratic committee’s network. One of their carefully crafted fraudulent emails had hit pay dirt, enticing an employee to click a link and enter her password.

    >>

    WASHINGTON (AP) - Exactly seven months before the 2016 presidential election, Russian government hackers made it onto a Democratic committee’s network. One of their carefully crafted fraudulent emails had hit pay dirt, enticing an employee to click a link and enter her password.

    >>