Push for life jacket law on Spokane River - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Push for life jacket law on Spokane River

Posted: Updated:
SPOKANE, Wash. -

Paul Delaney has been an avid whitewater rafter for 40 years. He knows the Spokane River like the paddle he uses to navigate it  "We use this river very regularly and we know how wonderful it is but on the other hand if you're not prepared how dangerous it can be," said the co-founder of the Northwest White Water Association Paul Delaney.

After seeing kHQ's story about five men being rescued without life jackets on the Spokane River last summer, Delaney says it's time for the city to take action.  He would like the city to create a law which would require those using the river to wear a life jacket. As of right now, the City of Spokane does not have any code in the books. However, Spokane County does and requires all people regardless of their age to wear a life jacket. If you don't, you could face a fine of $76.

But Delaney's proposal has hit some rapids along the way " A draft ordinance was prepared. I took a look at it, and it's nine pages long and said there's really nothing here that is related to life jackets," said Delaney.

The draft was all powerboat related. The draft mentioned running lights, collisions, and buoys. All that Paul would like is for the city to pass a simple ordinance. But there's a twist with the fine "I want to see it go one step further and that is when you have to bring out first responders for people who disobey the law I would like to see those people potentially liable for those costs."

  • Most Popular StoriesMost Popular StoriesMore>>

  • New York State illegally moving convicted sex offenders from prisons into group homes with the developmentally disabled

    New York State illegally moving convicted sex offenders from prisons into group homes with the developmentally disabled

    Thursday, September 20 2018 9:14 AM EDT2018-09-20 13:14:31 GMT
    Three State agencies are involved in placing convicted sex offenders in group homes or hiding this information from the families and the general public>>
    Three State agencies are involved in placing convicted sex offenders in group homes or hiding this information from the families and the general public>>
  • A bag for a bag: students tackle social stigma to fight food insecurity

    A bag for a bag: students tackle social stigma to fight food insecurity

    Tuesday, September 25 2018 2:15 AM EDT2018-09-25 06:15:59 GMT

    SPOKANE, Wash. - A problem within a solution – it’s a phrase so oxymoronic that it almost doesn’t make sense, but it’s crystal clear for a specific group of students at Lewis and Clark High School.

    >>

    SPOKANE, Wash. - A problem within a solution – it’s a phrase so oxymoronic that it almost doesn’t make sense, but it’s crystal clear for a specific group of students at Lewis and Clark High School.

    >>
  • VIDEO: Stack of Sandpoint newspapers lit on fire in latest anonymous attack targeting writer

    VIDEO: Stack of Sandpoint newspapers lit on fire in latest anonymous attack targeting writer

    Monday, September 24 2018 9:46 PM EDT2018-09-25 01:46:53 GMT

    SANDPOINT, Idaho. First -  it was a robocall, now a threat, targetting a Sandpoint newspaper and one of its writers, has surfaced on YouTube. "Ben Olson is a cancer on wholesome North Idaho," the video states. "And cancers must be burned out." The 56-second video clip shows a picture of Co-owner and Publisher of the Sandpoint Reader, Ben Olson, next to a stack of the newspaper he writes for. The papers are doused in a clear liquid then lit on fire. 

    >>

    SANDPOINT, Idaho. First -  it was a robocall, now a threat, targetting a Sandpoint newspaper and one of its writers, has surfaced on YouTube. "Ben Olson is a cancer on wholesome North Idaho," the video states. "And cancers must be burned out." The 56-second video clip shows a picture of Co-owner and Publisher of the Sandpoint Reader, Ben Olson, next to a stack of the newspaper he writes for. The papers are doused in a clear liquid then lit on fire. 

    >>
HD DOPPLER 6i
/
  • Top Stories from KHQHomeMore>>

  • USDA issues recall for ground beef sold at Safeway, Sam's Club

    USDA issues recall for ground beef sold at Safeway, Sam's Club

    Tuesday, September 25 2018 7:00 PM EDT2018-09-25 23:00:10 GMT

    Ground beef sold at Target, Sam's Club and several other national retails was recalled due to a deadly outbreak of E. coli, the USDA reports. The recall covers more than 132,000 pounds of beef products produced and packaged by Cargill Meat Solutions dated June 21. The products have an established number of "EST.86R" inside the USDA mark of inspection.

    >>

    Ground beef sold at Target, Sam's Club and several other national retails was recalled due to a deadly outbreak of E. coli, the USDA reports. The recall covers more than 132,000 pounds of beef products produced and packaged by Cargill Meat Solutions dated June 21. The products have an established number of "EST.86R" inside the USDA mark of inspection.

    >>
  • Trump administration rolls back oil train braking safety rule

    Trump administration rolls back oil train braking safety rule

    Tuesday, September 25 2018 6:44 PM EDT2018-09-25 22:44:54 GMT
    Gov. Jay Inslee wants federal regulators to issue an emergency order requiring safety inspectors to physically walk the rail lines in the hours before Bakken crude oil is transported.Gov. Jay Inslee wants federal regulators to issue an emergency order requiring safety inspectors to physically walk the rail lines in the hours before Bakken crude oil is transported.

    WASHINGTON - Trains that carry oil and other flammable materials near communities won't have to install electronically controlled braking systems to reduce risk of derailments and explosions after the Trump administration reversed an Obama-era safety rule on Monday. In a post on its website, the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration argued that the cost of installing the new brakes outweighs the benefit.

    >>

    WASHINGTON - Trains that carry oil and other flammable materials near communities won't have to install electronically controlled braking systems to reduce risk of derailments and explosions after the Trump administration reversed an Obama-era safety rule on Monday. In a post on its website, the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration argued that the cost of installing the new brakes outweighs the benefit.

    >>
  • Police: Woman hid mother's body, wanted to see it decompose

    Police: Woman hid mother's body, wanted to see it decompose

    Tuesday, September 25 2018 6:21 PM EDT2018-09-25 22:21:35 GMT

    ENFIELD, N.C. (AP) - Police have accused a North Carolina woman of keeping her mother's body at home for months, saying she wanted to see the stages of death.    Enfield Police Chief Tyree Davis said on his Facebook page Tuesday that 69-year-old Donna Sue Hudgins told a funeral home that 93-year-old Nellie May Hudgins had died but she didn't know where emergency responders had taken her mother's body.

    >>

    ENFIELD, N.C. (AP) - Police have accused a North Carolina woman of keeping her mother's body at home for months, saying she wanted to see the stages of death.    Enfield Police Chief Tyree Davis said on his Facebook page Tuesday that 69-year-old Donna Sue Hudgins told a funeral home that 93-year-old Nellie May Hudgins had died but she didn't know where emergency responders had taken her mother's body.

    >>