Mad Minute stories from Thursday, May 10th - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Mad Minute stories from Thursday, May 10th

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FORT DODGE, Iowa (AP) — With best friends like these, who needs enemies?
An Iowa man says his dog inadvertently shot him while they were roughhousing Wednesday.
Fifty-one-year-old Richard Remme, of Fort Dodge, told police he was playing with his dog, Balew, on the couch and tossed the dog off his lap. He says when the pit bull-Labrador mix bounded back up, he must have disabled the safety on the gun in his belly band and stepped on the trigger.
The gun fired, striking one of Remme’s legs. He was treated at a hospital and released later that day.
Remme told The Messenger newspaper that Balew is a “big wuss” and lay down beside him and cried because he thought he had done something wrong.

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RIDGEWOOD, N.J. (AP) — Police in New Jersey say a woman got angry at a cable TV worker and left her stranded in the air.
Police say the dispute started in Ridgewood on Monday between a woman and an Optimum employee. The Record reports the 59-year-old woman turned off the worker's truck while she was in the lift, leaving her stuck in midair.
Police say the woman took "utility property" before walking away.
Optimum says in a statement that the safety of its employees is their top priority and they're pleased their worker wasn't harmed.
The woman was charged with harassment, false imprisonment, disorderly conduct and criminal trespassing. She was released from custody with a pending court date.
No names have been released.
 
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BOSTON (AP) — It won't land him a spot in the Olympics, but a Massachusetts college student has run one of the fastest miles while juggling — an endeavor called "joggling."
Zach Prescott ran a 4 minute, 43.2 second-mile on Tuesday while juggling three lacrosse balls.
The junior business student who is on Boston University's track and cross country squads told The Boston Globe it's all about focus and rhythm. Once he gets used to the speed when he's running, "you're pretty much just juggling in place."
If verified, his time would beat the previous world record by .6 seconds.
A Guinness World Records spokeswoman says the organization is aware of Prescott's feat and working to determine whether he beat the current record, set in 1986, a process than can take several months.

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ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Residents of a village of 110 on the Alaska Peninsula see the occasional walrus in Bering Sea waters, but when 200 packed a beach just outside the community, it took them by surprise.
Port Heiden's Tribal Council President John Christensen, Jr. was on a beach ride with four-wheelers April 7 and smelled something foul, he said Wednesday.
"We thought something was dead, so we were looking for dead sea otters or seals on the beach so we could report them to the LEO (Local Environmental Observer) Network," he said.
He followed his nose for a couple of miles and was startled to see a beach crowded with walruses.
"We were wondering what those white things in the sky were," he said. "You could see their tusks in the air. When we got closer, we could see their bodies."
Two weeks later, Christensen saw more than a thousand walruses gathered about 20 miles (32 kilometers) outside the village.
Joel Garlich-Miller, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist with a focus on walruses, is not sure why they are gathering on the Alaska Peninsula, the land mass that juts from mainland Alaska toward the Aleutian Islands, but it may be related to food availability.
Male and female walruses spend winters in the Bering Sea but separate when ice recedes with warmer temperatures.
Females and their calves ride the sea ice north all the way through the Bering Strait into the Chukchi Sea, using ice as a platform to dive for clams and other mollusks and rest.
Male walruses traditionally spend summers in the Bering Sea, often on islands or remote locations in Bristol Bay roughly 130 miles (209 kilometers) north of Port Heiden, Garlich-Miller said.
In the late 1980s, as many as 10,000 walruses would gather on Round Island, part of a state wildlife sanctuary. In recent years, however, only 2,000 to 3,000 show up on Round Island, Garlich-Miller said.
That could be an effect of sea ice not forming as far south as in past years and male walruses spending more time in the northern Bering Sea, he said.
However, big bull walruses regularly go on foraging trips of five to seven days before "hauling out" to rest on land and may be spreading out to find better areas for diving, he said.
"They are trying to optimize their foraging," he said. "One can imagine these many thousands of animals can probably put a hurt on some of the benthic resources they're targeting."
A chief concern for the agency is keeping walruses safe in the resting areas.
Noisy approaches by people can startle herds, sending walruses stampeding into water, which can crush and kill vulnerable animals. Frequent disturbances also can drive walruses away from preferred resting areas, Garlich-Miller said, causing them to expend more energy foraging and affecting their overall body conditions.

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After one date, an Arizona woman reportedly decided her best chance to gain a man's affection was through texts. Lots of texts. Sometimes 500 per day. A total of 65,000.
Jacqueline Ades, 31, of Phoenix, was arrested on charges of threatening, stalking and harassment after allegedly sending thousands of messages -- including one stating she wanted to bathe in his blood.
Ades met the victim, a Paradise Valley man who was not identified, through a dating site, FOX10 Phoenix reported. The two went on one date, but Ades allegedly became infatuated and continued to pursue the man. He said Ades sent him about 65,000 texts and there were times he received 500 messages a day from her, according to FOX10.
The man reported Ades to police twice last year after she parked outside his residence and kept texting him, FOX10 Phoenix reported. Police escorted the woman off the victim's property, but the incident allegedly set Ades off.
Ades allegedly started to send threatening messages to the man, including one when she said she wanted to bathe in his blood, according to the station.
Last month, Jacqueline Ades was arrested after she was found bathing in the victim's bathtub when he wasn't home.  (Maricopa County Sheriff's Office)
"Oh what would I do with your blood! I'd wanna bathe in it," one text read, according to court documents.
"You do whatever you have to do to get here…but don't ever try to leave me .. I'll kill you .. I don't want to be a murderer," another message stated, according to officials.
Ades allegedly compared herself to Adolf Hitler, who she called "a genius."
Last month, the man called police after surveillance footage from his home showed Ades taking a bath in his tub while he was away on a trip. Paradise Valley police arrested Ades and also discovered a large butcher knife in her vehicle.
Ades was released from custody but failed to appear in court, AZ Central reported. She reportedly showed up at the man's place of employment in Scottsdale on Tuesday, but was escorted from the building by officers.
Ades told officers she was the victim's wife, police said. When Paradise Valley officers heard of the incident they arrested Ades in Phoenix.
Authorities said Ades told officers she had no intention of hurting the man and sent him the messages because she did not "want him to leave her" and she loved him.

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OCALA, Fla. –  All around some members of a Florida community, solid ground is suddenly opening up.
A sinkhole drained an entire pond. At least a dozen people were forced from their home when giant holes swallowed up land near them. One woman scrambled out of her home in the middle of the night after hearing a loud crack.
Sinkholes are not uncommon in Florida, but the frequency of the ones opening up in a community in Ocala the past two weeks is alarming officials and residents who live there.
In Winchase townhomes, more than a dozen sinkholes have opened around a retention pond—a pool designed to hold storm water runoff from streets to prevent flooding.
"When they first started opening up it was really scary, and we weren't sure whether we should stay here or stay with a friend or family member," said Maren Pinder, a mother of two who lives in the quiet community 80 miles northwest of Orlando.
The massive depressions have drained the pond, pulled water out of another one nearby and forced the evacuation of eight nearby homes, with some overlapping and intersecting to become larger.
The holes began appearing on April 25. Residents said they saw them burst open when water started exploding into what looked like a geyser shooting out of the now-empty pond.
"My husband said that when he was leaving for work the day it happened, he felt a depression in the road. It was soft on the concrete so it was no surprise to him that there was a sinkhole there later in the day," Pinder said.
According to the Florida Geological Survey, more than 400 sinkholes have been reported in the state since Hurricane Irma hit on September 10, 2017, a sudden spike from previous years. Meteorologists predict the upcoming hurricane season could be just as destructive – causing a ripple effect the causes the ground to give way.
Locals say there was another sinkhole epidemic here in 2012, which cost the Homeowner's Association thousands of dollars to fill and secure.
"The 2017 hurricane season was extremely active…we saw Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, Maria and Nate," said Brian LaMarre, meteorologist-in-charge at the National Weather Service Tampa Bay. "What we're looking at for the 2018 hurricane season is actually another above normal season."
Dr. Anthony Randazzo, co-principal of Geohazards, Inc. and professor emeritus at the University of Florida, advises engineers and architects of sinkhole and other ground risks before construction projects begin. 
He says weather and other factors contribute to the risk of sinkholes.
"This is a natural phenomenon, but it's exacerbated by the fact that we have a rapidly growing population in Florida occupying land areas prone to sinkhole activity," he said. "So we should see more and more sinkholes develop with time, particularly when they're triggered by large storm events."
The Sunshine State has more sinkhole activity than any other state in the country. The city of Ocala sits in a part of the state known as "sinkhole alley," and it all has to do with what lies beneath.
Florida's bedrock is made up of a porous layer on limestone, which Randazzo compares to a block of swiss cheese. He says it can break down over time as it interacts with acid naturally found in rainwater, causing anything above to collapse.
Randazzo said the process creates caverns in the limestone and has been going on for thousands of years, long before Florida was Florida, but can be accelerated by heavy rain from a hurricane or a tropical storm.
"Central Florida has limestone close to the surface that dates back millions of years, parts of Florida farther south have younger limestone which is deeper under the surface and not as permeable," he said, adding that the holes in the limestone existed long before the development was built.
"Sinkhole alley" accounts for two-thirds of the sinkhole-related insurance claims in the state, according to a Florida Senate Insurance and Banking Committee report.
In 1981, a crater near Orlando grew to 400 feet across and claimed five sports cars, most of two businesses, a three-bedroom house and the deep end of an Olympic-size swimming pool.
Crews are using underground radar and drilling machines to dig up to 100 feet down for soil samples in hopes of figuring out a solution to the cratered lunar landscape.
They have told residents the holes cannot be filled until testing is completed.
The Ocala Fire Rescue Department and the city's engineer, as well as the county's Emergency Management Department, have been investigating the sinkholes to try to prevent them from happening again.
Randazzo said preconstruction reviews of soil are not extensive enough and do not involve geologists to the extent that they should, adding, "as a result the underlying conditions that could produce a sinkhole are oftentimes missed and the construction goes on and then years later the structure experiences sinkhole activity."
"I don't know a whole lot about sinkholes, but you would think if they had fixed the one back in 2012 that would prevent future sinkholes here," Pinder said. "I'm hoping this time around they fix it so we don't have to worry about those sinkholes happening anymore."
A worse-case scenario is that these sinkholes continue to grow and eventually merge into one massive crater, something neighbors describe as their worst fear.

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(Huffington Post) "I was just appalled how someone would think that I wanted to be them and I actually went to medical school," Dr. Drai said.
You've heard of beating the rap? Well, a gynecologist in Pennsylvania has beat the rapper ? Dr. Dre, to be exact.
Last week, Draion M. Burch ? aka Dr. Drai ? won a three-year legal battle that began when he wanted to trademark his name.
That didn't sit well with the N.W.A. founder-turned-music industry mogul, who tried to block Drai's efforts, fearing people might be confused by their similar-sounding names, according to BuzzFeed.
Burch, author of books like 20 Things You May Not Know About The Vagina, won in part by arguing that "Dr Dre is not a medical doctor nor is he qualified to provide any type of medical services or sell products specifically in the medical or healthcare industry," according to court documents obtained by the BBC.
Furthermore, Burch testified that trading on Dre's reputation would be "a bad reflection on me as a doctor" because some of Dre's lyrics can be characterized as misogynistic and homophobic.
"I was just appalled how someone would think that I wanted to be them and I actually went to medical school," Burch is quoted as saying in the 49-page document issued by the trial and appeal board of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.
The board ruled that "the issue is not whether purchasers would confuse the goods or services but whether there is a likelihood of confusion as to the source of the goods or services." 
The board dismissed Dre's opposition, saying it found "no evidence of record" demonstrating that "consumers would likely believe the parties' goods and services would emanate from the same source." 
The decision doesn't give Drai carte blanche to do whatever he likes. Forbes points out that Dre could have a good case, should the real doctor start rapping about chronic endometriosis or "or anything about a 'G' Thang.'"
CNN notes that Dr. Dre ? whose real name is Andre Young ? hasn't issued a comment on the decision. 

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WORCESTER, Mass. (AP) — A Massachusetts state trooper has rescued a dog running loose in the middle of an interstate with the bribe of a homemade snack.
Trooper Nick D'Angelo responded to a report of a pup running loose along Interstate 190 in Worcester on Wednesday morning.
State police say the dog, named Dozier, was "hot doggin' it," down the highway as stopped motorists tried to capture him.
D'Angelo lured Dozier to safety with some homemade deer jerky.
Dozier has been reunited with his owner.
Massachusetts State police say it's always great making new friends, two- and four-legged.

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May 10 (UPI) -- A woman at her parents' home in Alaska captured video of a surprise visitor -- a bear that climbed up to the home's second-floor balcony.
The video, recorded from inside the safety of the southern Anchorage home, shows the bear climbing a tree next to the balcony and using it to reach some moose antlers that were apparently being used to give food or water to birds.
"I was upstairs at my parents' home cooking dinner when I noticed my cats looking out the back window leading to the small upstairs balcony," the filmer wrote. "Usually, there are just squirrels and birds coming by captivating the cats, but I checked outside anyway."
The woman said she initially didn't realize the tree climber was a bear.
"I thought it was a person who had climbed the tree until I got a closer look," she wrote. "The bear was only there briefly and I'd never gotten the chance in my nine years living here to see one this close, so I pulled out my phone because I knew my husband and parents would get a kick out of knowing a bear had been up on the balcony."

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May 10 (UPI) -- Arizona wildlife officials said a woman attempted to rescue a seemingly injured owl and ended up getting trapped in her car by the bird.
The Arizona Department of Game and Fish posted photos to Twitter showing the owl that the woman found in a dazed state on a road north of Tucson about 11:30 p.m. Monday.
"She retrieved it from the roadway, and it was essentially motionless, and took it into her car and at that time it revived and latched onto her steering wheel and her sleeve," Game and Fish spokesman Mark Hart told The Arizona Republic. "Her intention there was to render aid."
Hart said the woman's mother called Game and Fish officials to report her daughter was trapped in her car with the owl.
Officials suggested the woman attempt to douse the owl with water to get it to relax its grip, but the bird simply drank the water.
"She's fortunate she wasn't hurt," Hart said. "We have instances ranging from people trying to aid a coyote hit by a car and down on the street only to be bitten, to people separating young wildlife from their mothers in the mistaken notion that a mother has abandoned the small animal."
The owl eventually released its grip and left the car on its own without showing any apparent signs of injury, Hart said.
"Don't risk getting hurt aiding injured wildlife," the department tweeted.


 

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