Mad Minute stories from Thursday, May 31st - Spokane, North Idaho News & Weather KHQ.com

Mad Minute stories from Thursday, May 31st

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ARGENTINE TOWNSHIP, Mich. (AP) — Two girls have found what authorities say is a World War I-era practice bomb while swimming in a lake in Michigan.
The Flint Journal reports that 10-year-old Paige Burnett and 9-year-old Sage Menzies were searching for items below the surface of Lobdell Lake Tuesday when Paige felt something unusual.
The girls and Sage’s mother dragged the 3-foot-long (1-meter-long) mystery find from the murky water. Paige says they were excited at first, but then got worried. She says she was “so scared” it might explode.
The lake is in Genesee County’s Argentine Township, about 45 miles (70 kilometers) northwest of Detroit. Township police Sgt. Douglas Fulton says the Michigan State Police’s bomb squad came out and drilled a hole in it, but “nothing but mud came out.”

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SYDNEY (AP) — A hotel valet had a lucky escape — but the luxury sports car he was trying to park did not.
Australian media say the valet drove the soft-top Porsche Carrera under another vehicle Thursday outside the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Sydney.
Emergency workers cut the driver out from the Porsche as a crowd watched.
Matthew Talbot, the hotel's director of sales and marketing, told the Australian Broadcasting Corp. the valet was "embarrassed and a little bit shocked" but was OK.
The larger vehicle was propped up and its wheels were anchored while the vehicles were separated. The black Porsche, its hood and front bumper crunched and dented, was then backed onto a tow truck.
Witness Jonathan Bayle said he thought a television show or movie was being shot.
The hotel said in a statement it was investigating.
 
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PARK CITY, Utah (AP) — A Utah couple ran into a different sort of hazard during a round of golf on Memorial Day near Salt Lake City.
A young moose bigger than their golf cart chased them off the links at the Park City Golf Club.
Emily Clearwater of Phoenix says she watched the scene unfold from a relative's home nearby and took a video when she realized it was following them.
She said the young-looking moose went after the cart twice but eventually lost interest.
Golfer Mark Redican told the Deseret News he was getting ready to hit a shot when his wife started yelling. They jumped in the cart and made an escape as the animal headed off to a nearby pond.
He says the animal wasn't super aggressive, but it was "gigantic" so they didn't hang around.

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DETROIT (AP) — A Canada goose settled into right-center field during a rain delay at the Detroit Tigers game, and an attempt to remove it ended in chaos.
The grounds crew at Comerica Park in Detroit set off two firecrackers and another member gave chase Wednesday night. The bird tried to escape, but crashed into an LED board on the third deck and fell two levels into the stands.
Video of the goose's appearance was captured by Fox Sports Detroit.
After several moments, a veterinarian who was attending the game wrapped the stunned goose in a blanket and took it to the concourse, where it was released outside the stadium and dashed into nearby bushes.
After the rain delay, the Tigers went on to beat the Los Angeles Angels 6-1.

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STONY POINT, N.Y. (AP) — A school district just outside of New York City says it is considering a proposal from two fifth graders to get rid of homework.
Fifth-graders Christopher DeLeon and Niko Keelie at Farley Elementary School in Stony Point say they decided to petition for a homework ban due to stress from homework. WNBC-TV reports the district was already considering how to rethink homework for district students, saying they agreed with the students' points.
Assistant Superintendent Kris Felicello said Wednesday that officials are trying to rethink homework to make it more beneficial for students.
The district is considering several options, one of which would allow parents to ask for homework for their children. School officials hope to have a new homework policy ready to go for the next school year.

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PHILADELPHIA (AP) — One of four peacocks that wandered away from the Philadelphia Zoo and created a traffic jam on a nearby highway was found dead on that stretch of road on Thursday.
Zoo staffers had been working with authorities to try to locate the peacocks after they took a stroll along part of Interstate 76 about a mile (1.6 kilometers) from the zoo on Wednesday night. State police arrived and shut down two of the six lanes of traffic on the highway, causing backups for miles.
Police got the peacocks off the highway but were unable to capture them. The peacocks likely went to roost for the night, and the search was halted until daybreak Thursday.
Two teams of animal curators and keepers from the zoo and police officers circled the area where the peacocks were last seen. They also checked locations where the zoo teams thought the peacocks might explore.
The peacock found dead on the highway on Thursday likely had been hit by a car, zoo spokeswoman Dana Lombardo said.
The four peacocks were part of a larger flock that roams freely on the zoo's grounds and that is cared for by veterinary staff. The birds sometimes venture past the zoo's gates but normally return on their own, Lombardo said. They have a homing sense, and it's unusual for them to travel that far from the zoo, she said.
Zoo officials asked people not to approach the peacocks because they may be nervous being out of their normal environment. Instead, people who see the peacocks can send the location, day and time and a photo of the sighting if possible to peacocks@phillyzoo.org.

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PHOENIX –  In Arizona, robots zigzagging across a sidewalk will have the same rights as everyone else – and they will have to follow the same laws.
A new law signed by the governor earlier this month will allow delivery robots, or personal delivery devises, to operate on sidewalks throughout the state, but the robots have to be courteous and use crosswalks just like everyone else. Previously, motor vehicles, including robots, were forbidden on sidewalks.
"You don't want to think of it as a human with rights or something like that, but it causes them to have to obey the laws," said State Rep. Kelly Townsend, R-Mesa, who sponsored the bill. "So they can't just whiz out into the street, they can't run into somebody, they have to go by our current laws."
The law makes way for delivery robots to become big business in Arizona. The robot would work like this: Customers place a food or coffee order on an app, the eatery inserts the items inside a delivery robot – and the robot goes off, on its own, to make the delivery.
Townsend said she saw the robots at a conference in Boston and they intrigued her – so she wanted to bring them to her state. They can bring just about anything in minutes, from groceries to flowers to carry-out meals.
"It's super hot and people don't want to go out and go get their lunch or whatever it is that they need delivered," Townsend said.
Henry Harris-Burland, a spokesman for Starship Technologies, which touts itself as the first company to build delivery robots, said delivery robots are operating in 10 cities across five countries.
"Within the app, you can see what's available in your local area—it will be like a local marketplace of local shops and things like that," Harris-Burland said. "You order and get a robot within 15 to 30 minutes."
Starship Technologies was started by two of Skype's co-founders who wanted to solve current problems and inefficiencies of delivery by using robotics technology.
"We want delivery robots to be a common site on sidewalks around the world as quickly as possible," Harris-Burland said. "It's an emerging industry."
The robots use sensors to navigate sidewalks and cross streets.
Yet, some fear that the technology could be dangerous as more and more robots zip across sidewalks brimming with people.
"The robots on the sidewalk, they could be running into us or I could be running into it with the stroller," said Caitlin Erickson, an Arizona resident and mother who supports new technology but has some concerns. "Or is it going to damage property?"
Dominick Mack, an Arizona resident, said the technology could be helpful but also has concerns. 
"It's just a little crazy because I've never heard anything about that and it just seems like it's happening kind of fast—kind of like the whole autonomous car thing," Mack said. "Out of nowhere, we see them on the street."
Two months ago, an Uber autonomous car hit and killed an Arizona woman, leading the company to eventually shut its autonomous car operations in the state.
Townsend said the new law would pose restriction on delivery robots – it looks ahead to any issues that might arise. He said similar laws should have been in place to regulate self-driving vehicles before they hit the road.
"They came into our state, they were given a wide birth without a lot of regulation to operate and to test and the regulations were to come later," Townsend said. "For this technology and the bill that I put forward, I wanted to have basic safety regulations, common sense regulations, so that something like this wouldn't happen."
But he said he did not want to over-regulate the robots, which would deter businesses from coming. And under-regulating them would put people at risk, he said.
"It has to be a common sense, healthy balance of little bit of red tape but not a lot in order to keep people safe," Townsend said.
Harris-Burland said the difference between their autonomous robots and autonomous cars is the company's robots are 99 percent autonomous. The company will create "call centers" where operators keep their eyes on the robots.
"We never want to be 100 percent autonomous," Harris-Burland said. "So, we have humans in the loop, and that's not going to change. There's always going to be…situations that a robot finds itself in where every now and again you're going to need that human help. And those are the times where a human can take over and make those decisions."
"They're creating jobs but it seems like we'll be losing more entry level jobs," Mack said. "You probably have to be qualified to monitor the robots and do those kinds of things, whereas…a delivery job's more entry level. So, it's like you're gaining jobs but you're losing entry-level jobs that help a lot of people make ends meet."
The law will allow delivery robot companies to roll out their bots on sidewalks for a testing phase starting in August. There's also a sunset provision in place, where legislators in 2020 will examine how it's been working and discuss whether or the law needs to be revised.
Arizona is the seventh state to pass this type of legislation, paving the way for robots to be a part of people's daily routines. Some believe robots sharing sidewalks with pedestrians could be a common sight soon.
"Let's see how it does," Townsend said. "Let's give it a year and a half and see if it can deliver – you know, no pun intended."

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A Texas car salesman claims in a lawsuit that he's had to endure intentional flatulence and pinched nipples for over a year from his former boss.
Brett Bland filed the lawsuit against Jeremy Pratt and the dealership's parent company, CT Motors Inc., which operates AutoNation Acura Gulf Freeway in League City, Click 2 Houston reported Wednesday.
Bland accuses Pratt of inappropriate behavior in the workplace and making vulgar and rude comments toward him as well as creating a "sexually hostile environment" at work and online, the station reported.
"Pratt reinforced dominance over his subordinates by regularly entering their enclosed offices, intentionally passing gas, and then laughing as they were forced to breathe soiled air," Bland claims.
Pratt was fired from the dealership after he passed a flyer out at work suggesting that Bland was a sexual offender, Click 2 Houston reported, lawsuit documents.
Bland also accuses the dealership of retaliating against him because of Pratt's firing. Bland claimed that he was told he'd be fired if he failed to sell a certain amount of cars and that Pratt was allowed to hang around the facility even after he was fired.
It's unclear if Bland continues to work at the dealership.
"This is a pending legal matter on which we have no comment, other than to say that we previously investigated the matter several months ago and took appropriate action," AutoNation said in a statement to Click 2 Houston.
Bland is seeking damages, but it's unclear how much money he is seeking.

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May 31 (UPI) -- A man preparing to swim with sharks off New Zealand captured the moment one of the "unpredictable" predators clamped its jaws down on his boat.
The video, recorded off the coast of Tairua, Coromandel, shows the mako shark with its head out of the water, biting down on the deck of the filmer's boat.
"I was about to jump in the water to swim with this mako shark, and this is the welcome we get," the filmer wrote.
The man said his intention was to change perceptions of sharks as inherently dangerous.
"Mako sharks are the fastest and most unpredictable shark in the sea, but they are also threatened with extinction due to commercial and recreational overfishing," he wrote. "The aim of the game here is to get in the water, cageless, to show people what sharks really are and change people's perspectives through stimulating visual imagery like this, laced with scientific information."

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May 31 (UPI) -- A man who made an error while choosing his Michigan Lottery numbers said it was the "best mistake" he ever made after winning $100,000.
The Tuscola County man told Michigan Lottery officials he was buying a Fantasy 5 ticket from Worth's Party Shore in Millington when he made a mistake while putting in his usual numbers.
"I usually play 04-14-28-30-31, but I accidentally picked 29 instead of 28," the man said. "Rather than starting over with a new slip, I just decided to go ahead and play those numbers and I'm so glad I did."
The error led to the player's ticket matching all five numbers in Thursday's drawing, 04-14-29-30-31, earning the $100,000 jackpot.
"Winning the jackpot was all because of a simple mistake, but it's definitely the best mistake I've ever made," the winner said. "I can't tell you how it feels to win the jackpot. It's a once in a lifetime kind of thing."
The man said he plans to use his winnings to pay his mortgage.


 

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