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Take these steps to extend your car’s life (sponsored)

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Keith Appleton is married and has a kid now - but he’s still driving the 2002 Subaru Forester he got as a teenager. An education outreach officer at STCU, Appleton credits regular maintenance for his car’s long life.

"I can't replace (my car) for what I can sell it for," he says. Now, "it's almost been a quest to see how long I could keep it."

You can’t do much to control gas prices or insurance rates. But you can take steps to make your car last longer - squeezing as much use out of your ride as possible before you have to buy a new one.

Here are some tips from Appleton and Chuck Jones, a service adviser at Autocraft in Spokane Valley.

An ounce of prevention.

Jones says preventive maintenance means getting the oil changed and replacing the fluids ? transmission, power steering, differential, brake and coolant ? on a regular basis.

With new synthetic oils, Jones says that typically means a change every 5,000 miles (instead of 3,000 for conventional oil). For other fluids, check the owner's manual.

Your owner’s manual also will tell you how often to change your filters and belts and perform other relatively inexpensive tasks that will keep your car healthy and help prevent pricey problems down the road.

Tread carefully.

Jones also advises drivers to pay more attention to their vehicles’ tires and wiper blades. Both are critical for keeping you and your car accident-free.

"Tires are what keep the car safely on the ground," Jones says. They allow the car to take that corner or make that quick stop. So, especially as winter approaches, check tires for worn tread or cracking and replace them as needed.

Replace wiper blades yearly, Jones says. Without them, you can’t see in the rain or snow - and many accidents are caused because the driver simply didn't see that bicyclist, pedestrian or stalled car, he says.

A set usually costs $50 or less - cheap compared with your deductible and other expenses from a crash.


Keep a record.

Finally, Appleton recommends keeping track of all the work done on your car and all the parts you or your mechanic have purchased for it. His owner's manual is stuffed with every receipt for every part he's ever bought for his Forester.

When a part wears out prematurely, he has the receipt to turn in for the guarantee.  When he goes to a mechanic, he's able to show what work he's done recently and help narrow the search for the current problem.

It’s all about attention to detail - now and for miles to come.


Balancing act.

No matter how careful you are, your car won’t last forever.

Appleton’s decision to hold on to his 2002 Forester comes down to the cost of a repair vs. a loan payment. The monthly payment for a new vehicle hit $523 earlier this year, according to Experian. So even if Appleton spends $200 in a month on repairs, he's come out ahead.

But if the repair costs more than 20 to 30 percent of the vehicle's worth, it may be time to look at other options, Jones says.

To prepare for that eventual new (or new-to-you) car, Appleton suggests test driving an auto loan. Put aside money for a few months to see how it works with your budget. Once you're ready to buy, you can steer that savings into the down payment.

For more information visit the STCU blog at https://stcu.org/learn/blog/extend-your-cars-life

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