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FRIDAY, Jan. 27, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Natural gas stoves have become the latest flashpoint in America’s increasingly volatile political culture, after a top federal regulator publicly mulled over banning the appliances.

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The city of Memphis and the nation are bracing for the release of a police video depicting five officers viciously beating a Black man who later died. Tyre Nichols' death prompted murder charges Thursday against the officers and outrage at the country’s latest instance of police brutality. Nichols died three days after a confrontation with the officers during a traffic stop on Jan. 7. Shelby County District Attorney Steve Mulroy says video of the traffic stop will be released to the public sometime Friday evening. Nichols' family and the Memphis police chief say they expect protests, but urged people to demonstrate peacefully.

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The world is trying to switch from electricity produced by burning fossil fuels to cleaner wind and solar power, but some people have worried that there aren't enough rare earth minerals to make the green electricity switch. A new study Friday finds that the planet has enough of the 17 different types of materials needed, but will have to ramp up mining. Scientists say it will add a bit to pollution, but be offset by savings in getting rid of dirty power plants. The study doesn't look at minerals, like lithium, for batteries or cars. That's a tougher issue that will be studied next.

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When Bill Lawrence was developing his new Apple TV+ comedy ”Shrinking,” he introduced one of the characters in the pilot script as a “Harrison Ford-type.” Never did he dream he'd get the real thing. Yet the “Indiana Jones” actor agreed to play the part of a tough therapist who works with star Jason Segel in a mental health practice. Cast members like Segel and Jessica Williams as well as writer Brett Goldstein marveled at Ford's generosity in acting and said he never made them feel like he needed special treatment. “Shrinking” starts streaming Friday.

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Social media users shared a range of false claims this week. Here are the facts: Flavor enhancers added to food products do not contain aborted fetal tissue. Changes to Federal Aviation Administration requirements that airline pilots must meet for cardiac health were not prompted by COVID-19 vaccines. A video shows a train transporting tanks along a highway in Kansas, not in Poland after President Joe Biden announced the U.S. would send military vehicles to Ukraine. And medical experts say there's no link between the toxic pesticide DDT and the viral disease polio.

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Two months after undergoing surgery for serious burns, Jay Leno is now contending with a number of broken bones after being knocked off a motorcycle. The comedian and former “Tonight Show” host told a Las Vegas Review-Journal columnist Thursday that he broke his collarbone and two ribs and cracked his kneecaps on Jan. 17. The November garage fire and January wreck both stemmed from his passion for working on vintage vehicles. Last week, it was a vintage motorcycle. He insisted he was OK and would even be working this weekend, adding that the intense coverage of the November fire made him reluctant to say anything.

WASHINGTON – A panel of policymakers and educators, including author Dave Eggers and former U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, gathered at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday to promote the American Teacher Act. The bill, if passed, would authorize the federal government to create four-year grants for states to enact and enforce minimum school teacher […]

The post Teachers would get $60K minimum salary under bill in Congress making grants to states appeared first on Georgia Recorder.

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Ten Filipino men who worked for a major offshore oil industry employer under federally granted visas claim in a federal lawsuit they were treated like prisoners at a company bunkhouse and that some of them were abandoned there when Hurricane Ida struck the Louisiana Gulf Coast in August 2021. Their former employer denies the claims and has struck back with a counterclaim accusing the workers of defamation. The judge in the case dismissed the defamation allegations in a Jan. 20 order. The competing court filings at the U.S. District Court in New Orleans lay out starkly different views of life for Filipino workers at Louisiana-based Grand Isle Shipyard.

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Stocks are drifting as a strong week for Wall Street appears to be heading for a quiet close.  The S&P 500 was 0.3% higher Friday after flipping between small gains and losses through the morning. It is on pace for its third winning week in the last four and near its highest level since the start of December. American Express was helping lead the way. It jumped after giving a profit forecast that topped Wall Street’s expectations. Next week could be even busier for Wall Street. The Federal Reserve is expected to announce its latest increase to interest rates.

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(The Center Square) – More than six out of every 10 voters with children under 18 would be receptive to the prospect of their child attending a school outside of their locally zoned public district, a new State Policy Network poll finds.

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A comet is streaking back our way after 50,000 years. NASA says the dirty snowball last visited during Neanderthal times. It will come within 26 million miles of Earth on Wednesday before speeding away again. And it might not return for millions of years. Discovered less than a year ago, this harmless green comet already is visible in the northern night sky with binoculars and small telescopes. It's expected to brighten in the Northern Hemisphere as it draws closer and rises higher over the horizon. Skygazers in the Southern Hemisphere will have to wait until next month.

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It’s been nearly a decade since Smokey Robinson’s last album, but new music from the King of Motown is on the horizon. Robinson announced Friday that he will release the nine-track album “Gasms” on April 28. “Gasms” features new songs produced and written by Robinson himself. The former vice president of Motown Records released his last collaborative album, “Smokey & Friends,” nine years ago. The upcoming album's first single “If We Don’t Have Each Other” is already available for streaming. Robinson will soon be honored alongside fellow Motown musician Berry Gordy as the 2023 “Persons Of The Year” at the Recording Academy’s annual MusiCares event.

Tech and media layoffs have gotten the most headlines lately. But combined, the two high-profile industries account for only about 5% of U.S. employment, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Other industries are also cutting jobs, including the auto industry, manufacturing and financial services. Unemployment is expected to deepen as the Fed slows the economy in...

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Prosecutors in Massachusetts are basing their murder case against a man whose wife is presumed dead but whose body has not been found in large part on a series of gruesome internet searches. But experts warn that incriminating internet searches are not enough alone to build a case. Prosecutors said at Brian Walshe's arraignment that he used Google to look up ways to dismember and dispose of a body. His wife, Ana Walshe, has not been seen since Jan. 1. Northeastern University School of Law professor Daniel Medwed says prosecutors have plenty of other evidence to make their case, including blood and DNA.

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The next novel by two-time National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward is the story of an enslaved teenage girl that the publisher is calling a blend of magical realism, historical narrative and Dante’s “Inferno.” Scribner, an imprint of Simon & Schuster, announced Friday that Ward’s “Let Us Descend” will come out Oct. 3. It’s her first novel since “Sing, Unburied, Sing,” which won the National Book Award in 2017, and first fictional work set in the distant past. The 45-year-old Ward is the only Black woman to receive two NBAs and has been praised for her striking lyricism and uncompromising perspective.

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(The Center Square) – Twenty-five attorneys general and several other plaintiffs have sued the Biden administration asking the court to halt a federal ESG policy that could negatively impact the retirement savings of 152 million Americans.

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Debts brought into a relationship can be ruinous for couples, but many decide to work as a team to conquer individual debts. You can help your partner in nonmonetary ways as an accountability buddy. You can also assist financially by gifting or loaning money, or covering more household costs while your partner focuses on making debt payments. But if you’re helping pay off a debt that’s 100% your partner’s responsibility, it’s important to consider how to keep things fair and not put your relationship — and your own finances — at risk.

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TORONTO and LONDON, Jan. 27, 2023 /PRNewswire/ - Blu Ivy Group, a global leader of Employer Brand Strategy and Creative, has been named the winner of the RAD Award for Best Employer Brand Events and Experiential. The award recognizes the most innovative of employer brand experiential and eve…

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Several years of pandemic restrictions and curriculum battles have emboldened longtime advocates of funneling public funds to private and religious schools in statehouses throughout the country. Republicans and parents’ rights activists are pushing voucher-style education savings account proposals in a dozen states that would allow students to use taxpayer dollars toward education outside traditional K-12 schools. The debates have inflamed teachers’ unions and resurfaced concerns about efforts to gradually privatize public education. If enacted, they could transform the nature of state government’s relationship with the education system and deepen contrasts between how going to school looks in many red versus blue states.

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A University of Michigan student is one of the world’s foremost “speedcubers,” a person capable of quickly solving a Rubik’s Cube. He also is an accomplished violinist. Stanley Chapel says the two fields go hand in hand and the violin has aided in his speedcubing success. The 21-year-old is the world champion in two categories of blindfolded speedcubing. Factoring in the time it takes for him to review the cube before placing the blindfold over his eyes, Chapel can solve one in around 17 seconds. The junior majoring in violin performance intends to defend his titles later this year in South Korea.

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Oklahoma's chief medical examiner has positively identified the body of a child found earlier this month as 4-year-old Athena Brownfield. The Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation made the announcement on social media Thursday. The girl was reported missing Jan. 10 when a postal carrier found her 5-year-old sister alone outside the home where she lived with Ivon Adams III and his wife, Alysia Adams. Ivon Adams was arrested in Arizona on murder and child neglect charges and returned to Oklahoma. Alysia Adams is charged with two counts of child neglect. The bureau says it will not have additional comment on the case due to a gag order.

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