CASPER, Wyo. (AP) — A man and woman admit in court they drove from Arizona to Wyoming with two children in the trunk of their car.

Sixty-three-year-old Michael J. Fee and 31-year-old Amber L. Freudenstein each pleaded guilty Thursday to two misdemeanor counts of child endangerment.

The Casper Star-Tribune reports Circuit Judge Steven Brown sentenced each to 30 days in jail. Fee is from Peoria, Arizona, and Freudenstein is from Tempe, Arizona.

Sheriff’s officials say a third party told them the children reported riding in the trunk for much of the 900-mile drive while two German shepherds sat in the back seat.

Fee said in court there was not enough room for everyone so the children were relegated to the trunk. Court documents show the children are about 6 and 10 years old.

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BERLIN (AP) — Keep your blue suede shoes behind the curb: the central German town where Elvis Presley was stationed as a U.S. soldier in the 1950s has installed three pedestrian lights with images of the American rock icon.

The red shows an image of the singer striking a pose at a microphone and the green depicts his trademarked hip swivel dance.

They went online this week in the town of Friedberg, where Elvis, who died in 1977, was stationed at the U.S. Army's Ray Barracks from October 1958 to March 1960. He lived in nearby Bad Nauheim.

Friedberg, north of Frankfurt, already has an "Elvis Presley Platz" — Elvis Presley Square — and decided to add the three lights as an added attraction for the many Elvis fans who already make the pilgrimage to the town.

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NEW YORK (AP) — It took just days for the brightly colored Mandarin duck that appeared suddenly in a Central Park pond to turn both New Yorkers and visitors into a new gaggle: the quackarazzi.

A horde of photographers has been gathering daily in the park off Fifth Avenue for well over a month, hoping to catch a glimpse of the exotic bird with pink, purple, orange and emerald green plumage and markings that admirer Joe Amato compares to "a living box of crayons."

"So many people are drawn to this bird because its vibrant, vivid colors are associated with sunsets and rainbows," said Amato, who comes almost daily from his Queens home with his expensive camera equipment in tow.

Bird lovers and sightseers have dutifully documented the bird's every move through social media postings and videos that have noted its gentle glides across the water, its sniping at the ordinary mallards and even a vacation, of sorts, to a lake in nearby New Jersey.

This week, New York's latest rising star didn't disappoint — with the feathery showboat preening its wings in the shadow of the historic Plaza Hotel as people on shore jostled for a better look.

Leesa Beckmann commuted two and a half hours from her home in Vernon Township, New Jersey, to see the duck that her 90-year-old mother has been talking about since its arrival.

"I've got to see this magnificent duck," Beckmann said to her mother.

She plans to shoot and frame photos for her mother to hang on the wall.

Ornithologist Paul Sweet, however, who heads a vast collection of bird specimens at the New York-based American Museum of Natural History, isn't as throttled as others are about the duck.

Sweet says there's nothing special about a Mandarin duck in Central Park. Not only is there another one (albeit captive) a short walk away at the Central Park Zoo, but such ducks are often imported from Asia for use on private property. From time to time, they escape into the wild.

"This bird is clearly not a vagrant," said Sweet, adding that there are no records of actual wild Mandarin ducks in North America. If that actually happened in New York, of all places, "birders would be very excited." For now, he says, they're not.

"A lot of non-birders tend to see gaudy birds as more beautiful," Sweet said. "But to me it's no more beautiful than, say, a sparrow."

In this case, expertise is not the point: Beauty is in the eyes of the New York beholders — humans for whom the carefree creature that has made Central Park its home offers some kind of balm in a troubled, chaotic world.

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HOLLY HILL, Fla. (AP) — A woman has been scorned by her neighbors in a high-rise Florida condo because of a holiday message she spelled out in lights across her balcony.

Kathy Hill says the Ebenezer Scrooge phrase 'Bah Humbug" is one of her favorites at Christmas.

But other residents of the twin towers of Marina Grande in Holly Hill weren't amused.

The Daytona Beach News-Journal reports that Laurie Borasky-Gigliotti, who owns the unit Hill is renting, told her to take down the display because other residents were coming unglued. She says balcony lights are against the rules, "let alone Bah Humbug." She warned Hill, a California woman who recently moved to Florida, to prepare for "major, massive retaliation."

Hill turned off the lights, and says she didn't mean to offend anyone.

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HOXIE, Ark. (AP) — A first-time political candidate in northeast Arkansas has learned a valuable civics lesson: vote early.

Cliff Farmer didn't make it to the polls in time to vote Tuesday, and his race for a Hoxie City Council seat ended up as a tie.

The Jonesboro Sun reports Farmer and his wife were returning from a Florida vacation on Tuesday when their plane landed only an hour before polls closed. The plane landed in Memphis, Tennessee, which is 80 miles (130 kilometers) from Hoxie.

His wife voted early, but Farmer said he'd intended to vote after they returned. That resulted in Farmer and incumbent Alderwoman Becky Linebaugh each receiving 223 votes. Linebaugh says she voted.

A winner will be declared next week by a coin toss or another game of chance.

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VISALIA, Calif. (AP) — A high school teacher in central California was arrested on suspicion of felony child endangerment after forcibly cutting the hair of one of her students while singing the national anthem, authorities said.

Margaret Gieszinger was arrested Wednesday after videos posted to social media showed a student at University Preparatory High School in the city of Visalia sitting in a chair at the front of the classroom as Gieszinger cuts his hair.

In a video obtained by KFSN-TV, the 52-year-old science and chemistry teacher is heard belting the "Star Spangled Banner" while cutting chunks of the boy's hair and tossing them behind her. The circumstances of what led the teacher to cut the student's hair were not immediately known.

After cutting the boy's hair, Gieszinger grabs at a girl's long hair before the students make a run for it out of the classroom, the video shows.

Officers responded Wednesday to the high school housed on the grounds of the College of the Sequoias, a California community college, after receiving reports of child endangerment involving a teacher and a "pair of scissors," Police Chief Kevin Mizner told the Vasalia Times Delta. Mizner did not immediately return a message from The Associated Press seeking comment.

Rob Herman, a spokesman for the Tulare County Office of Education, said counselors were made available Thursday to support students at the public high school.

"We take very seriously the safety of the students in classrooms and on the COS campus," Herman said in an email.

Herman said Gieszinger "will not return to her classroom," but wouldn't say whether she was fired.

Gieszinger was hired in August to teach at the high school part-time, he said.

Gieszinger's teaching credential was suspended for 14 days in 2016 "for immoral or unprofessional conduct," according to the state's Commission on Teacher Credentialing. Her teaching credential was also suspended for two weeks in 2017 but the commission does not list a reason.

Lilli Gates, one of Gieszinger's students, told the newspaper the incident was out of character for the teacher.

"When everything was going on I was terrified, and I so badly wanted to blame her," Gates said. "She is a loving and kind lady. She is usually all smiles and laughs. This is not the Miss G. we know and love."

Gieszinger is being held on $100,000 bail. It was not immediately known if she has an attorney.

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ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) — A large-scale cheesecake giveaway clogged not only arteries but also the roads surrounding a Virginia restaurant where one person was taken to a hospital and faces a disorderly conduct charge.

Arlington County Police say they received calls Wednesday about traffic disruptions as a Cheesecake Factory restaurant in Clarendon was participating in a national giveaway of 40,000 cheesecake slices in conjunction with a food-delivery service. Police spokeswoman Ashley Savage says nearby roads were jammed, would-be delivery drivers were double-parked.

A spokesperson for DoorDash says the food delivery company is aware of the incident and cooperating with local law enforcement.

One individual refused police commands to leave the restaurant and resisted efforts at removal. Savage says the individual requested medical attention after the altercation and was taken to a hospital.

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A wallet that Diane Keaton misplaced decades ago has turned up in a New York storage unit.

The Oscar-winning actress lost the wallet 50 years ago, she said on Instagram this week.

This past May, "treasure hunter" Anton Lulgjuraj bought the contents of a deserted storage unit in Putnam County at an auction and discovered the wallet as he was perusing a dusty box, the Daily News reported.

Inside the wallet were Keaton's 1966 driver's license and "Actors' Equity Association" card, along with a stack of personal and family photos.

"I opened it up and thought, 'Is this Diane Keaton the actress? It couldn't be. Or maybe it could,'" Lulgjuraj told the outlet.

Lulgjuraj reached out to Keaton on Twitter in an effort to return her wallet and photographs, but wasn't able to make contact, he said.

After the Daily News wrote about his storage unit find, however, Keaton caught wind of the story and took to social media to voice her disbelief.

"SOMEONE FOUND A WALLET I LOST 50 YEARS AGO! THANK YOU, MR. LULGJURAJ! PLEASE DM ME!" Keaton wrote in an Instagram post, attaching a childhood photo she said had been inside the wallet.

"This is the craziest story! I don't remember losing this, but I'm not surprised because I've lost my wallet many times!" she added on Twitter.

Lulgjuraj told the outlet he was "thrilled" by Keaton's messages and said he'd mailed the wallet and its contents to Keaton's attorney.

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Dec. 6 (UPI) -- An Alaska couple who were startled by a late-night doorbell ringing checked security footage and identified the culprit: a moose's rear end.

Kyle Stultz and Allie Johnstone said they were confused when their doorbell rang about 1:30 a.m. Wednesday at their Anchorage home, but there was no one at the door when they checked moments later.

"We were thinking kids coming through playing ding dong ditch or maybe a neighbor coming through. We had no idea," Stultz told KTVA-TV.

The couple checked their home security camera footage and were surprised to see the rear-end of a moose playing "ding dong ditch."

"We had this nice moose behind waiting for us right here," Stultz said. "And he decided to back up right into it and that's how he got our doorbell."

Johnstone said the moose caboose offered "a bit of comic relief. It's really nice."

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Dec. 6 (UPI) -- An Oregon man who arrived at a lottery office too early to claim his $1,750 prize ended up winning an additional $118,000.

Sam Hawley, of Portland, told Oregon Lottery officials he arrived at the organization's Wilsonville Payment Center about 7:30 a.m. to claim a $1,759 Special Keno 8-Spot prize, but quickly discovered the office didn't open until 8:30 a.m.

Hawley traveled to the nearby Wilsonville Fred Meyer store and bought another Keno 8-Spot ticket using the same numbers.

"I have used the same numbers for years," Hawley said.

He said he was in the process of claiming his $1,750 prize when he discovered his new ticket had won him an $118,000 jackpot. He won the $93,759.60 rolling jackpot as well as a $25,000 bonus for matching all eight numbers.

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