Mad Minute

CAVE CITY, Ky. (AP) — Federal officials are investigating a report that a man fired a gunshot while camping at Mammoth Cave National Park, an incident that another camper says was prompted by an alleged sighting of Bigfoot.

Mammoth Cave said law enforcement rangers responded early Sunday to a report of a person with a firearm at one of the Kentucky park’s backcountry campsites.

Brad Ginn told news outlets he and his girlfriend were camping nearby and were awakened about 1 a.m. by a man with his son. The man said they were going to investigate strange noises he kept hearing. Ginn said he heard a gunshot minutes later and the man returned to say Bigfoot had emerged from the woods, so he fired.

Ginn said he and his girlfriend decided to leave and report the incident.

Park spokeswoman Molly Schroer says an investigation continues and the park is safe to visit.

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RENO, Nev. (AP) — An unopened copy of a 1987 cult-classic video game that a Nevada man found in the attic of his childhood home is expected to sell for up to $10,000 at an online auction.

The boxed game cartridge of Nintendo's "Kid Icarus" was still in the bag with the receipt for $38.45 from J.C. Penney's catalog department three decades earlier.

Scott Amos of Reno told the Reno Gazette Journal he initially thought it might be worth a couple hundred dollars.

But Valarie McLeckie, video game consignment director at Heritage Auctions, says it's one of the hardest Nintendo titles to find in sealed condition. She says there are fewer than 10 in the hands of vintage game collectors.

"To find a sealed copy 'in the wild,' so to speak, not to mention one in such a nice condition and one with such transparent provenance, is both an unusual and rather historic occurrence," she said. "We feel that the provenance will add a significant premium for serious collectors."

Wata Games, a video game grading service, gave Amos' copy a rating of 8.0 on a 10-point scale.

Amos said no one in the family has a recollection of purchasing the game, but the Dec. 8, 1988, purchase date hints it may have been intended as a Christmas present.

"I can remember the game. My neighbor down the street had it. I remember it being hard, and I was never that good of a gamer guy," he said. "All the family has been trying to come up with a hypothesis ... (My mom) thinks she put it there and never got it back out, and then it ended up in the attic."

The game, based loosely on Greek mythology, follows a cupid-like protagonist named Pit attempting to rescue Palutena, the goddess of light, who is imprisoned by the evil Medusa.

"Get ready for the action and adventure of Greek Mythology translated to the Video Age," the game's packaging says. "Will you survive to restore Palutena's light and return it to 'Angel Land'? Only you know."

The online auction closes Thursday.

If the sale goes as expected, it could net Amos and his family $10,000. They're planning to have some fun with it.

"I have an older sister, too. We're splitting (the proceeds) 50-50," Amos said. "We're going to do a Disney World vacation next month."

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SPARTANBURG, S.C. (AP) — A South Carolina woman says a porch pirate may have stolen a package containing nine tarantulas from her front porch.

News outlets report the woman says she received a notification Friday morning that the FedEx shipment had been delivered. When she went to get the package, she says it wasn't there. The Spartanburg County sheriff's office spokesman Lt. Kevin Bobo says the package was still missing as of Tuesday.

A report from the sheriff's office says the spiders are valued at $1,000. The responding deputy listed the case as a "possible larceny of mail."

The report says there's no surveillance video from the home and there are no suspects at this time.

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WEST MIFFLIN, Pa. (AP) — Authorities say a woman suspected of urinating on potatoes at a Walmart in Pennsylvania has turned herself in.

West Mifflin police say 20-year-old Grace Brown is facing multiple charges including criminal mischief, open lewdness and public drunkenness. It wasn't known if she's retained an attorney.

Brown turned herself in Tuesday after learning that authorities were looking for her.

Authorities had posted surveillance photos of the incident on Twitter. But they haven't said when the incident took place or why she allegedly relieved herself on the potatoes.

A Walmart representative has said an employee saw what Brown was doing. The company "immediately disposed of the affected products and sanitized the area."

The incident comes weeks after video posted on social media showed people licking ice cream from Walmart freezers in Texas and Louisiana.

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GARFIELD HEIGHTS, OH - A 79-year-old woman from Ohio will have to spend 10 days in jail for feeding stray cats.

Nancy Segula of Garfield Heights said she started feeding them a few years ago when the cats would visit her on her back porch.

"I used to have a neighbor that had a couple of cats and he moved away so he left them. I would always feed them and care for them because I was worried about them and I'm a cat lover," Segula told WJW.

But Segula's neighbors called the authorities who issued her a citation.

She received three others. The final one told her to appear in front of a judge who sentenced her to 10 days in the Cuyahoga County Jail. She has to report on Aug. 11, WJW reported.

Segula's son, Dave Pawlowski, told WJW he couldn't believe his mother's sentence.

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HILLSBOROUGH, N.C. (AP) — Officials in North Carolina are looking for an emu on the loose that was last spotted jumping on the hood of a car before running away.

News outlets report that officials say the emu, nicknamed "Eno", was sighted over the weekend. Orange County Animal Services spokesperson Tenille Fox says it's believed to be in the Hillsborough area.

An Orange County government Twitter account posted an emu's mugshot Friday with the word "wanted" in red letters. Officials say it's been on the run for about five weeks. They don't know where the flightless bird escaped from.

Fox says people shouldn't try to catch it, but instead call animal services.

Fox says owning emus is legal in Orange County. She says they're often kept on farms and don't usually run away.

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LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — A Nebraska state trooper has cited a driver after pulling over a vehicle that had registration stickers painted onto its license plates.

Nebraska State Patrol spokesman Cody Thomas says the vehicle was stopped Monday morning at an Interstate 80 exit in north Lincoln. Trooper Adam Strode spotted the problem, and he ticketed the driver for having fictitious plates and not having valid registration.

It's unclear whether the driver also was the artist whose unsteady hand fashioned two rough red rectangles in the upper right-hand corner of the plates. The number 5 was in the middle, signifying a May expiration for 2020.

Thomas says troopers he's talked to told him it was the first time they'd heard of or "seen anything like this."

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Tip for aspiring bank robbers: Don't use your real name on the slip of paper you're using to demand other people's money.

Michael Harrell, 54, allegedly tried ordering a teller to hand over the cash from a U.S. Bank location in Cleveland around 11 a.m. Monday, according to the FBI.

He's accused of passing a note to the teller — but the note was written on the back of a document from the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles...complete with the alleged crook's full name and address.

"When the teller took the note, and looked at it and looked at the other side, she saw his name. He had used a note that he had used earlier at the BMV and it had his name on it," said Special Agent Vicki Anderson, of the FBI's Cleveland field office, told WJW.

The teller referred to Harrell by his name and gave him an unknown amount of money before calling 911, Anderson said. Investigators reportedly confirmed Harrell's identity on security cameras and issued a warrant for his arrest.

Anderson said Harrell isn't the first person to allegedly incriminate themselves during a crime.

"We've had individuals drop cell phones that have all their identifying information in it," the special agent said. "A lot of times, we're sending out pictures, we have no idea who this person could be or what part of town they could be from. And when you present a note that has your name already on it, and address, it helps law enforcement tremendously."

Despite the head start, authorities haven't yet taken Harrell into custody.

Anyone with information on Harrell's location is urged to contact the Cleveland Division of Police at 216.623.5000 or the FBI's Cleveland field office at 216-522-1400.

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NEW YORK (AP) — A mother duck and her nine babies were crossing a New York City street when three ducklings fell through a storm grate and had to be retrieved by police.

The rescue happened Sunday in the bustling Brooklyn neighborhood of Park Slope.

Witness Lynn Harris told the news site Gothamist people had noticed the ducks and were following beside them, trying to provide a safe escort when the mother duck was spooked by a dog.

That's when three of her little ones dropped through the grate outside a hospital.

A crowd including animal rescuer Sean Casey gathered to help. Police officers opened the grate — but then dropped it into the hole.

A nurse peeked in and shouted, "They're alive!"

The ducks were then taken to a shelter.

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One Nevada restaurant is making the most of the hordes of grasshoppers that have descended upon Las Vegas — by using them as inspiration for a pizza topping.

"What started out as a joke amongst our stoner friends has swept the nation," Evel Pie, located on Fremont Street, announced on Facebook Tuesday. The pizza shop said their new pizza, dubbed "The Canyon Hopper," is for "only the bravest daredevils."

The pie consists of chorizo, goat cheese, caramelized onions, arugula, and, of course, lime- and garlic-roasted grasshoppers.

Described as "damn good," Evel Pie said the creation's tastiness surprised even the staff.

The inspiration for the pie likely stems from the insect influx Nevada has seen in recent weeks. Videos showed Las Vegas, in particular, was swarmed with grasshoppers — which pose no danger, as they don't carry disease and don't bite, according to scientists.

Jeff Knight, an entomologist with the Nevada Department of Agriculture, told local media last week that wet weather is probably to blame for the migration of adult pallid-winged grasshoppers.

He said the number of grasshoppers moving from north to central Nevada is rare, but noted that, as history shows, "when we have a wet winter or spring, these things build up often down below Laughlin and even into Arizona."

The grasshopper invasion has been so prominent that the National Weather Service's Las Vegas office released radar footage last week appearing to show a storm, which actually showed "biological targets" — the grasshoppers that invaded the city.

This year, the Las Vegas area recorded more rain in six months than the annual average of just under 4.2 inches per year.